The Favourite Review

Greek director Yorgos Lanthimos is not the most accessible filmmaker for your average audience. To begin, his characters don’t behave as if they are bound to the same cultural norms that we are. Conversations that would be utterly taboo in our society are discussed with abandon, like Steven (Colin Farrell) in The Killing of a Sacred Deer casually telling a colleague that his daughter has started her period. Lanthimos’ worlds run parallel to our own, but they offer a unique and sometimes disturbing vision of our darker desires.

In The Favourite, now in limited release, Lanthimos pits Lady Sarah (Rachel Weisz) and servant Abigail (Emma Stone) against one another for Queen Anne’s (Olivia Colman) affections. While The Favourite is the first Lanthimos film he didn’t at least co-author himself (the screenplay is credited to Deborah Davis and Tony McNamara), it’s sure to have lots of quirks peculiar to this avant-garde director. To prepare for The Favourite or just find out more about this rising auteur, we have prepared a primer.

Read More »

“There was nothing that didn’t appeal to me about it,” replied Emma Stone when asked about why she wanted to be a part of The Favourite, Yorgos Lanthimos’ latest directorial outing. The film has been a standout on the fall film festival circuit wherever it has played. I caught it on opening night at the New York Film Festival, and it’s been my favorite film of 2018 ever since.

The Favourite provides a delicious showcase for three tremendously talented actresses in a sumptuous period setting without ever getting mired in mothballs. Olivia Colman’s Queen Anne provides the center of gravity, shifting the equilibrium of England with her every erratic whim. At the start of the film, Anne’s mood is stabilized by a lifelong friend, Rachel Weisz’ Sarah Churchill. Her hold on the queen’s heart and purse strings receives a real challenge, however, when Sarah’s cousin, Emma Stone’s Abigail, enters the palace grounds and begins to rise in Anne’s esteem.

This is not the Wikipedia version of history by any stretch of the imagination, and as such, many more questions linger after viewing than the traditional costume drama. Luckily, I was able to run a few of them by stars Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz as well as director Yorgos Lanthimos at roundtable discussions earlier this month. We talked about how The Favourite journeyed from script to screen, how everyone tuned into Lanthimos’ particular wavelength and why we’ll never know what the director thinks about any of his endings.

Read More »

The Favourite Review

A bumbling leader with little idea of the extent of duty and responsibility, surrounded by opportunistic aides looking to gain influence by obsequiously flattering the power broker and swaying the weight of an empire behind their pet cause, a coterie of enablers willing to treat geopolitical conflict like a game with winners and losers… but anyways, enough about the latest Maggie Haberman story about the White House in The New York Times, let’s talk about The Favourite! Read More »

the favourite trailer

Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone may be fighting for Olivia Colman‘s favor in The Favourite, but all three are fighting for a place in the upcoming Oscar race.

Yorgos Lanthimos‘ highly anticipated new film received rave reviews and plenty of Oscar buzz at the Venice and Telluride film festivals, pushing all three actresses to the forefront of the acting categories at the Oscars. And on the tail of the period piece’s buzzy festival debut, Fox Searchlight has dropped the official The Favourite trailer.

Read More »

the favourite trailer

The Oscar race just got a whole lot more interesting. Following up his unsettling masterpieces The Lobster and The Killing of a Sacred Deer, director Yorgos Lanthimos‘ latest film is a glorious period piece perversion. Lanthimos heads to 18th century England with The Favourite, a historical drama starring Emma Stone and his The Lobster star Rachel Weisz. See The Favourite trailer below.

Read More »

the killing of a sacred deer trailer

It seems that auteur filmmakers are all about pushing audiences to their limits these days. Darren Aronofsky’s mother! is infamously pushing audiences to the point of leaving the theater, and now The Killing of the Sacred Deer presents a disturbing follow-up to director Yorgos Lanthimos‘s bleak The Lobster.

A new trailer highlights the anxiety and dread replete within The Killing of a Sacred Deer, which made waves at the Cannes Film Festival in May and continued to gather buzz at the Toronto International Film Festival and Fantastic Fest. But be warned, this trailer seems to say: things are about to get messed up.

Read More »

the killing of a sacred deer trailer

The Lobster was a bit of a shock for everyone who went in expecting an off-kilter black romance — instead director Yorgos Lanthimos served up a disquieting social satire with underpinnings of horror as his first English-language feature.

Now, reuniting with his Lobster star Colin Farrell, Lanthimos is going full psychological horror with his newest film The Killing of a Sacred Deer

Read More »

Colin Farrell - The Lobster

Actor Colin Farrell and director Yorgos Lanthimos know a good thing when they see it. After their previous collaboration had given us The Lobster, one of the best films of 2016, the two reunited for the upcoming The Killing of a Sacred Deer. Before we even see their next movie, news comes that Farrell will play Oliver North in Lanthimos’ limited series in development at Amazon.

Below, learn more about the Colin Farell Amazon series.

Read More »

nicole kidman the killing of a sacred deer

Hollywood often doesn’t seem to know what to do with Nicole Kidman and that’s shame. When paired with the right material, she’s one of the most interesting actresses out there and she only gets more fearless with each passing year. And since it takes that special kind of fearlessness to appear in a Yorgos Lanthimos film, it makes perfect sense that she has joined the cast of The Killing of a Sacred Deer. Delightful, twisted sense.

Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

The Lobster review

Note: With The Lobster in limited release this weekend, we’re re-running our review from the New York Film Festival.

Audiences have come to expect the bizarre from director Yorgos Lanthimos, who broke out in 2009 with the wonderful and unsettling Dogtooth, and The Lobster definitely doesn’t disappoint on that front. It’s set in a dystopia where single people are transformed into animals; the title refers to the animal that Colin Farrell‘s David has chosen to become if he can’t find a mate.

If weird were all The Lobster had going for it, though, it’d be little more than an experimental curiosity. What makes The Lobster must-see viewing is the film’s pitch-black sense of humor, its uncomfortably keen insights into real-life relationships, and even, in spite of everything else, its aching romanticism.  Read More »