(Welcome to Hidden Streams, a column focused on the best older movies available to stream on your favorite services, including Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, and more.)

The death of FilmStruck might make it harder for cinephiles to dig those older hidden gems out of the overwhelming piles of streaming titles. From lesser-known classics to cult favorites, we’ve put together a handy guide to some of the best older films you can stream on the various platforms. In this edition of Hidden Streams, you’ll find plenty of golden (and not-so-golden) oldies to check out or revisit – and nothing that was released after 1985.

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Eyes Wide Shut Christmas

‘Tis the season for Grinches and Gremlins, for leg lamps and Clark Griswold, and for the annual debate over the quality (or lack thereof) of Love, Actually – an argument that has grown more boring (and annoying) than the annual declaration that Die Hard is actually a Christmas movie. But in this house, ’tis the season for Stanley Kubrick; be it the wintry and claustrophobic familial terror of The Shining, or the harrowing yuletide sex odyssey taken by Tom Cruise in Eyes Wide Shut. Kubrick’s final film hardly needs justification for its place in the Christmas movie canon (many others have successfully argued for this classification). What could – and will – be argued, however, is that Eyes Wide Shut is the best Christmas movie of our lifetime. Read More »

It’s been a hot minute since we last checked in with the young heroes of Marvel’s Runaways, which debuted last year on Hulu. The series, based on the Marvel comics of the same name, follows a group of teens who discover that their parents are part of an evil supervillain group/cult known as the PRIDE. Despite their differences, the kids band together to cope with this life-altering information… and try to stop their parents. In case you need a refresher, here’s everything you need to know about the first season of Marvel’s Runaways before Season 2 premieres on December 21.

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(Welcome to Hidden Streams, a column focused on the best older movies available to stream on your favorite services, including Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, and more.)

The demise of FilmStruck might make it harder for cinephiles to dig those older hidden gems out of the overwhelming piles of streaming titles. From lesser-known classics to cult favorites, we’ve put together a handy guide to some of the best older films you can stream on the various platforms.

In this edition of Hidden Streams, you’ll find plenty of golden (and not-so-golden) oldies to check out or revisit, including a transcendent concert documentary, a rowdy girl gang ahead of its time, a great Stephen King adaptation, and more – and nothing that was released after 1985.

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(Welcome to The Soapbox, the space where we get loud, feisty, political, and opinionated about anything and everything. In this edition: why have people embraced the troubled musician in A Star is Born, but not the troubled musician in Vox Lux?)

The story goes like this: A world-famous musician who can’t get out from under their traumatic past struggles with an addiction that threatens to destroy their relationships. Their narcissism and recklessness are crudely exacerbated by drugs and alcohol. They are perhaps only, as the narration might inform us, marginally talented, and yet they endure. That unnamable something – the “it” factor, that sparkle, that je ne sais quois – has kept their fans adoring long past a reasonable expiration date.

That description could be attributed to prominent characters in two films released this year; while one of them has drawn near-consistent praise, the other has been criticized as being aggressively unlikable. The biggest difference between the two is, perhaps unsurprisingly, their gender.

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wayne's world 2 defense

(Welcome to The Unpopular Opinion, a series where a writer goes to the defense of a much-maligned film or sets their sights on a movie seemingly beloved by all. In this edition: the sequel to Wayne’s World is actually better than the beloved original.)

In 1993, just one short year after Wayne’s World transitioned from SNL favorite to box office hit, Paramount unleashed the sequel. Despite the fact that Wayne’s World 2 received mixed reviews and couldn’t seem to attract as many fans as the first film, it remains a hilarious and highly-underrated sequel – a delightfully silly follow-up that ups the ante while wryly (or obnoxiously, given the behind-the-scenes drama) delivering a formulaic sequel; a sort of self-aware cinematic Mad Libs. In my mind, Wayne’s World 2 belongs to the small group of comedy sequels that are better than their predecessors, like Problem Child 2 and Gremlins 2. At the very least, it should be considered just as great as the first film.

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the marvelous mrs. maisel recap

Break out the manischewitz and a plate of shrimp spring rolls because The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is back, babies! It’s been over a year (actually one year and six months, but who’s counting) since Rachel Brosnahan’s Midge Maisel last took the stage, and while Season 2 is sure to bring plenty of changes, there’s quite a bit you might not remember about Season 1. To make sure you’re properly prepared (Midge wouldn’t have it any other way), we put together this handy guide to everything you need to remember about Season 1 before the long-awaited second season premieres on Amazon Prime on December 5.

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House That Jack Built spoiler review

(In our Spoiler Reviews, we take a deep dive into a new release and get to the heart of what makes it tick…and every story point is up for discussion. In this entry: The House That Jack Built.)

It’s been five years since Lars Von Trier released Nymphomaniac, the bold and astonishing two-parter that figuratively put a period (or exclamation mark, if you rather) on the end of his filmography. Where does a provocateur like Von Trier go from there? What else is left to say? The answer is The House That Jack Built, a deranged, pitch-black comedy (yes, really) that explores the life of a narccisistic serial killer, played by Matt Dillon (again: yes, really).

As is typically the case with Von Trier, the story is far more thematically complex and layered than that short synopsis might suggest, and every bit as unsettling and occasionally brutal as you might expect. But is the director’s cut – which screened in theaters for one night only – as controversial as some have claimed?

Major spoilers to follow.

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(Welcome to Hidden Streams, a column focused on the best older movies available to stream on your favorite services, including Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, and more.)

FilmStruck is dead, which might make it harder for cinephiles to dig those older hidden gems out of the overwhelming piles of streaming titles. But that won’t stop us from trying. From lesser-known classics to cult favorites, we’ve put together a handy guide to some of the best older films you can stream on the various platforms. In this edition of Hidden Streams, you’ll find plenty of golden (and not-so-golden) oldies to check out or revisit, including a deeply upsetting animated film, a melancholy musical, the master of suspense, and more – and nothing that was released after 1985.

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The Favourite True Story

The Favourite is, predictably, a somewhat fictionalized telling of the story of Queen Anne (Olivia Colman) and the rivalry between two of the most important women in her life: Sarah Churchill (Rachel Weisz) and Abigail Masham (Emma Stone). But you might be surprised to learn that the latest work of darkly comedic idiosyncrasy from Yorgos Lanthimos is actually more faithful to history than most period dramas. When it comes to monarchy, truth is often stranger (and more absurd) than fiction, and the embellished bits of Deborah Davis and Tony McNamara’s screenplay only serve to enrich the true story on which The Favourite is based.

So exactly how much of The Favourite is fact, and how much is fiction? In this companion piece, we’ll explore the life of the real Queen Anne (including her ill health), the party politics at play in her court, her relationships with Sarah Churchill and Abigail Hill, the alleged love triangle between the three women, and the ultimate outcome.

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