Making of 1917

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, find out how the Golden Globe-winning and Oscar-nominated war drama 1917 was filmed to look like it unfolds in in a single shot. Plus, dancer Jenna Dewan, takes a look at dancing scenes from movies such as La La Land, Napoleon Dynamite, Save the Last Dance, Pulp Fiction, and more. And see how the flying sequences in Maleficent: Mistress of Evil were shot with special rigs and plenty of blue screen. Read More »

Hell's Club mash-up

There’s a good chance no one has ever thought that they’d like to see a movie that intersects the worlds of films such as Star Wars, Scarface, John Wick, Collateral, Terminator, Trainspotting, Saturday Night Fever and more. But that’s exactly what Antonio Maria Da Silva has done with a wholly strange, mesmerizing and fantastic cleverly edited short compiled by using clips from all these movies.

We’ve featured supercuts and trailer remixes before, but this Hell’s Club mash-up is something completely different. We don’t want to give anything away, but Da Silva sets up the video by saying, “There is a place or fictional characters meet. Outside of time, outside of all logic, this place is known as Hell’s Club. Just watch it and be mesmerized. Read More »

Watch A Brief History of Movie Title Designs

As part of the screening put together in relation to the SXSW Title Design Competition, Ian Albinson from the website The Art of the Title Sequence put together a nice two and a half minute compendium of excellent film titles. (That features an occasional piece of television, too.) For any long-time film lover, this little video will probably elicit quite a few responses simply on the strength of the title cards on display. I queued several films to re-watch after exposure to just a few seconds of their titles.

Check out the collection after the jump. Read More »

Since 1989 the National Film Registry has preserved films in the Library of Congress that are determined to be “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.” This year’s crop of additions has been announced and it’s a pretty varied group that seems to recognize lasting value of ‘new’ classics (The Exorcist, Grey Gardens, All the Presidents Men) and some of the achievements of people who passed this year (Airplane!, The Empire Strikes Back, The Pink Panther). Read the full list after the break. Read More »