Nicolas Winding Refn streaming service

Everybody is launching their own streaming service these days. Apple, Disney, YouTube…and Nicolas Winding Refn. Yes, the director behind Drive and The Neon Demon is setting up his own website where he plans to stream films and host essays. Now, the director has announced several cult classics he plans to make available to stream first.

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Too Old to Die Young trailer

Danish filmmaker Nicolas Winding Refn is known for movies like Drive and Only God Forgives – hyper-stylized, often meditative films that are drenched in pulsing electronic scores, neon lights, and tons of blood. Now he’s taken all of his predilections, tossed them in a blender, and poured out Too Old to Die Young, a new Amazon series that looks like the apotheosis of every idea he’s ever explored as a director. It also looks like what Refn might do if he were handed the keys to HBO’s True Detective.

Check out the first Too Old to Die Young trailer below. Read More »

Too Old To Die Young Cast

Stylish, divisive filmmaker Nicolas Winding Refn is making the leap from the big screen to the small with the upcoming Amazon series Too Old to Die Young, and Refn recently took to Twitter to announce his full cast. The Amazon series, which finds Refn teaming with comic book writer Ed Brubaker, is described as a crime thriller that will “explore various characters’ existential journeys from being killers to becoming samurai in the city of angels.” The full Too Old to Die Young cast is revealed below.

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Why Amazon Wants Their Movies Released Theatrically

Amazon Prime Instant Video

Amazon wants to start producing 15 movies a year with “top filmmakers.” They’ve already collaborated with some notable directors, having joined forces with David O. Russell and Nicolas Winding Refn for some shows, in addition to distributing Kenneth Lonergan‘s Manchester by the Sea. Now, they’re producing the latest films from Todd Haynes (Carol) and Lynne Ramsay (We Need to Talk About Kevin), and for a good reason, the company wants their work shown in a theater like the rest of us.

Below, learn why Amazon theatrical releases matter to the distributor.

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nicolas winding refn amazon series width=

Less than two month’s after director Nicolas Winding Refn‘s (The Neon DemonToo Old to Die Young was announced, the Amazon series has found its lead in Miles Teller. The Whiplash and War Dogs star will play an L.A. cop who gets pulled into an underground world of assassins. Refn is directing all 10 episodes.

Below, learn more about the Nicolas Winding Refn amazon series.  Read More »

The Avenging Silence

There was a time when it would’ve been surprising for a notable filmmaker at the top of his game to make the leap to television, but those days are over. These days, everyone from David Fincher to Cary Fukunaga to Jane Campion is jumping between the big screen and the small one. And as of now, we can add Nicolas Winding Refn to that growing list as well. He’s just been set to team with Amazon for Too Old to Die Young, a crime thriller described as being in a similar vein as his Pusher film trilogy.  Read More »

The Neon Demon ending questions

Nicolas Winding Refn‘s The Neon Demon is a beautifully shot yet polarizing film. It’s either shallow, pretentious, sensationalistic and self-indulgent or a bold haunting hypnotic work of suspense. I’m still not sure if I liked it or not, but It has certainly remained with me since my viewing of the film over the weekend. My reaction is typical — the movie has gotten a very mixed reaction from critics and film geeks.

My viewing has prompted a deep dive into interviews and analysis of the film, and I thought I’d share some of the insights into The Neon Demon ending, the symbology and metaphors both obvious and more hidden. I’ll also attempt to answer some of your The Neon Demon questions.

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Nicolas Winding Refn Spectre

Nicolas Winding Refn has flirted with directing some big studio movies. The Neon Demon director was attached to the Ryan Gosling-led Logan’s Run remake for a while, and he later came close to signing on to make The Equalizer. One of the bigger titles the filmmaker was in the running for was Spectre, a sequel Sam Mendes ultimately returned to direct.

Refn confirmed he had a conversation regarding the film. Below, Nicolas Winding Refn discusses Spectre.

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Nicolas Winding Refn pic

Nicolas Winding Refn‘s name appears many times in The Neon Demon, in both the opening and closing credits. But even if his name weren’t mentioned, nobody would mistake this darkly funny horror movie as anything but a Refn film. This time around, however, the director behind Only God ForgivesDrive, and Bronson tells a story from a woman’s perspective — which is a first in his career.

The Neon Demon stars Elle FanningJena MaloneAbbey Lee Kershaw, Bella Heathcote, and, in a part that was shot over the course of three days, Keanu Reeves. Which one of these characters, with the possible exception of Reeves’ sleazy motel manager, is the titular demon is up to the viewer to decide. In my brief conversation with Refn, he refers to Jesse as the Neon Demon, but his story, which he co-wrote with Mary Laws and Polly Stenham, leaves plenty of room for an audience to think otherwise.

Sometimes you never fully know what to expect from Refn, as proven by our own Jacob Hall’s somewhat contentious interview with him and composer Cliff Martinez. I’ve spoken to the director a handful of times over the years, and just like his work, he’s unpredictable, and also curious, engaged and not without a good sense of humor about himself and his movies.

Below, read our Nicolas Winding Refn interview, which has some mild spoilers for The Neon Demon.

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neon demon interview

The Neon Demon won’t be for all tastes, but the latest film from Drive director Nicolas Winding Refn is a singular and memorable experience. It’s the kind of movie that lingers in the back of your brain for days after your screening, resurfacing every so often with a startling image or strange moment. It’s very much a companion piece to Refn’s Only God Forgives, exchanging the broken and doomed masculinity of that film to explore the feminine world of professional models, superficial beauty, and other, gnarlier subjects that don’t deserve to be spoken about in polite company.

Refn himself is polite company, even when your conversation about his divisive new film (which I quite like) turns a little contentious. I sat down with the filmmaker and his frequent collaborator, composer Cliff Martinez, to discuss why all films find audiences, the future of the entertainment industry, and how making a controversial film is harder than it looks.

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