Friedkin Uncut Trailer

Legendary filmmaker William Friedkin – you know, the guy who directed Jade! – gets the documentary treatment with Friedkin Uncut. A cavalcade of talented folks, including Francis Ford Coppola, Quentin Tarantino, Willem Dafoe, Wes Anderson, Matthew McConaughey, and more, are all on hand to talk about what makes Friedkin so special. Watch the Friedkin Uncut trailer below.

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the devil and father amorth review

It’s been nearly 45 years since director William Friedkin first terrified audiences with The Exorcist, and now the filmmaker is ready to return to the taboo religious practice with the documentary The Devil and Father Amorth.

The concept is too irresistible to pass up: here’s the director of The Exorcist making a documentary about a real exorcism. It practically markets itself. Friedkin, for his part, heavily leans in to the idea, devoting the first 10 to 15 minutes of The Devil and Father Amorth with a brief recap of how he came to make The Exorcist. From this intro, the thrust of the film becomes clear: the title may be The Devil and Father Amorth, but it’s William Friedkin who is front and center.

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the devil and father amorth trailer

When William Friedkin released his iconic horror film The Exorcist in 1973, he had never seen an exorcism. But decades later, that would change. Now, Friedkin has made a documentary diving into the exploits of a real-life exorcist: The Devil and Father Amorth.

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the exorcist

(Welcome to The Final Girl, a regular feature from someone who has steered clear of horror and is ready to finally embrace the genre that goes bump in the night. Next on the list: William Friedkin’s seminal Oscar-nominated horror film The Exorcist.)

I’ve passed by the Exorcist staircase more than a dozen times. And every time, someone in my group excitedly whispers “That’s the stairs from The Exorcist,” and we stare up silently, daunted by its steep incline and the worn-out stones. It’s only a key location from one of the most acclaimed horror films in cinematic history, you know.

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William Friedkin exorcist sequels

With The ExorcistWilliam Friedkin directed one of the most iconic horror films of all time, the tale of a young girl possessed by a demon with a potty mouth. Despite Friedkin’s success with The Exorcist, the filmmaker had nothing to do with the multiple sequels that followed. While some of the sequels (Exorcist II: The Heretic) are downright dreadful, Exorcist III is surprisingly very good. Still, none of the sequels can hold a candle to Friedkin’s original. In a new interview, Friedkin weighed-in on his thoughts on the Exorcist sequels, and also revealed what he thinks of the smash horror hit It.

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william friedkin treehouse of horror

Who better to cameo in The Simpsons annual “Treehouse of Horror” special than one of the masters of horror himself?

William Friedkin, the director of the 1973 horror classic The Exorcist, will make a cameo in the Fox animated show’s annual horror special, “Treehouse of Horror XXVIII.”

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the exorcist

Over a week ago we learned Fox was moving forward with a pilot based on William Peter Blatty‘s book The Exorcist. The new adaptation of The Exorcist has been in the works for a few years now. Originally, Martha Marcy May Marlene director Sean Durkin was a part of the series. Then, after Durkin’s departure, screenwriter Jeremy Slater (Fantastic Four) stepped in to the write the adaptation.

The Exorcist TV series has picked up some more steam now, because Fox just enlisted Rupert Wyatt (Rise of the Planet of the Apes) to direct the pilot.

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Francis Ford Coppola

Francis Ford Coppola makes a lot more wine than he does movies nowadays. We haven’t seen a film from the iconic director behind The GodfatherApocalypse Now, and The Conversation for four years now. His last picture, Twixt, came and went. Over the past decade Coppola has been directing some of his most experimental work, not what he calls “factory movies,” which he has no interest in making. Read more about why the director stopped making movies for major studios after the jump.

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Winter of Frankie Machine

It’s a thrill to see William Friedkin developing new projects. He’s got his hands in a TV show based on his own film To Live and Die in L.A., and now he’s moving forward with a film based on Don Winslow‘s novel The Winter of Frankie Machine, about a retired mob killer with a new life as a low-key seaside entrepreneur who is drawn back into mob violence.

This one has been percolating for a few years, with a number of different directors attached. With new heat on Winslow thanks to his recent novel The Cartel, it’s no wonder this one is moving forward again.  Read More »

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To Live and Die in LA TV series

William Friedkin‘s film To Live and Die in L.A., released in 1985, is a compelling and vividly stylish ’80s thriller featuring William Peterson, Willem Dafoe, and John Pankow in the story of two Secret Service agents on the trail of a counterfeiting operation. The film was a return to form of sorts for Friedkin, and now the story might offer him that opportunity again.

Friedkin is directing a To Live and Die in L.A. TV series for WGN America. Read More »