Simon Pegg and Anton Yelchin

Anton Yelchin would have been 30 years old this year, but the star of Green Room, Charlie Bartlett, Terminator Salvation and the Star Trek reboot franchise died in a tragic accident in June of 2016. Three years later, a new documentary called Love, Antosha looks back at the unfortunately short life of the actor who touched a lot of people, both through his work and his life. Now a new clip from the documentary features Simon Pegg telling a story that illustrates just how wonderful of a person Anton Yelchin was. Read More »

Anton Yelchin Documentary Trailer

Three years ago, we were shocked to learn about the sudden and tragic death of Anton Yelchin, star of such films as Star Trek, Fright Night, Like Crazy, Green Room, Charlie Bartlett and more. At 27 years old, the actor was the victim of a freak accident that caused him to be found pinned between his Jeep Grand Cherokee and a brick pillar outside his house in Studio City, California.

Now fans can learn more about Anton Yelchin than they ever did before thanks to the new documentary Love Antosha, which tells the actor’s life story by way of archival footage, behind the scenes photos, and intimate details provided courtesy of the actor’s parents, Irina and Viktor Yelchin. Watch the trailer below. Read More »

Sundance 2019 logo

While 2018’s edition of the Sundance Film Festival might not have launched any major Oscar heavyweights, it turned out a steady stream of modest summer hits from first time directors (Hereditary, Sorry to Bother You, Eight Grade) as well as three non-fiction films that were blockbusters by documentary standards (Three Identical Strangers, RBG, Won’t You Be My Neighbor?). Plus, countless Sundance selections remained critical favorites that stuck around in the conversation through the end of last year (Wildlife, Minding the Gap, Hale County This Morning, This Evening).

This is all to say, never believe anyone who tells you that a given year at Sundance is a “weak” one. Fluctuations in programming focuses and projects submissions rarely yield a continuous trajectory for a festival. That may prove doubly true for the 2019 edition of the Sundance Film Festival, which is the first under Kim Yutani’s leadership as director of programming following the long reign of Trevor Groth. This year’s festival looks noticeably more inclusive and diverse, both in terms of the stories being told and the people who are telling them. The lineup pulls less obviously from established festival favorites in favor of providing a platform to emerging artists who may have only a scattered short or feature to their name.

There’s going to be a lot to follow out of this year’s Sundance Film Festival, and thankfully /Film will have several writers on the ground in Park City to report out the big finds and stories. But for those of us who aren’t making the trek up into the mountains of Utah for Sundance, there’s still a way to be a part of the festival.

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