Widows trailer

Academy Award-winning director Steve McQueen is back with Widows, his first feature film since 2013’s 12 Years A Slave – and he’s lined-up a cast to die for. Viola Davis, Elizabeth Debicki, Michelle Rodriguez and Cynthia Ervio play the widows of criminals who band together to pull off a heist to pay off their dead husband’s debts. Watch the Widows trailer below.

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Irreplaceable You trailer

What if you new for a fact that the person you loved would die soon? How would you approach that? And how would your dying significant other face this? These very difficult questions get the tear jerker movie treatment in Netflix’s new original film Irreplaceable You, starring Gugu Mbatha-Raw and Michiel Huisman. Watch the Irreplaceable You trailer below.

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james franco as tommy wiseau

Almost three years ago, James Franco optioned the rights to Greg Sestero‘s book The Disaster Artist, which the actor wrote about the experience of making The RoomThe Room, of course, is director/writer/star Tommy Wiseau‘s cult midnight classic, a movie made with significantly more passion than skill. While we were hoping to see Franco’s film and Zeroville out last year, Franco’s behind-the-scenes look at The Room is debuting next month at South by Southwest.

Before The Disaster Artist premieres, there’s a new pic of Franco brothers from the film. Below, check out The Disaster Artist photo.

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Equals trailer

A lot of filmmakers have a certain theme they return to time and time again, and for director Drake Doremus it seems to be love in all of its messiness and complications. Like Crazy dealt with the long-distance relationship between an American and a Brit, and Breathe In with the love affair between a married man and a much younger woman. His latest film, Equals, pushes him into the sci-fi realm for the first time… but it’s still a love story at heart, chronicling a romance that unfolds under the most inhospitable of circumstances.

Nia (Kristen Stewart) and Silas (Nicholas Hoult) live in one of those Apple Store dystopias that seem so popular at the cinema these days. All human emotion, including sexual desire, has been eradicated. But Silas and Nia begin to fall for each other when they catch a disease that sparks feeling in its victims, and strike up a dangerously forbidden romance. Watch the Equals trailer after the jump.  Read More »

james franco as tommy wiseau

The Room is one of the most fascinating bad movies ever made. Like so many examples of accidental outsider art (see the likes of Dangerous Men), here is a movie that isn’t lazy or lacking in passion – it’s just made by somebody whose burning desire to tell a story outweighs his talent on every conceivable level. The mainstream acceptance of The Room has been a double-edged sword for the film’s legacy. It is now one of the most famous stinkers of all time, but its status as an underground sensation has been tarnished by its move into the mainstream. Everyone can quote The Room, which dulls the mystique that powers so many cult favorites.

I’m absolutely fascinated by The Disaster Artist, James Franco‘s new film that will chronicle the making of The Room. I wonder if this look behind the curtains, brought to you by one of the most delightfully weird guys working in Hollywood at the moment, will restore the film as a B-movie oddity worthy of discussion or continue to reduce it to memes.

Long story short: Franco has revealed a first look as himself as The Room director Tommy Wiseau and a bunch of new people have joined the cast.

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James Franco‘s Hollywood dramedy Zeroville is putting together quite an impressive Hollywood cast. Franco himself is set to star as well as direct, and now we have word he’ll be joined by — take a deep breath — Seth Rogen, Will Ferrell, Danny McBride, Craig Robinson, Dave Franco, Jacki Weaver, Horatio Sanz, Joey King, and Megan Fox.

Based on the 2007 novel by Steve Erickson, Zeroville centers on an alienated movie lover who makes his way to Los Angeles in the late ’60s. Hit the jump for Zeroville cast details including character info.

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The last few years have seen a great career upswing for Woody Allen, as his film Midnight in Paris helped re-ignite broad audience interest in his movies, and became his greatest commercial success. Blue Jasmine, starring Cate Blanchett, had a good run earlier this year, and now Allen is finishing his next film.

The new movie takes place in southern France and spans a couple of decades, roughly through the ’20s and ’30s. It stars Eileen Atkins, Colin Firth, Marcia Gay Harden, Hamish Linklater, Simon McBurney, Emma Stone, and Jacki Weaver. Now the title has been revealed to be Magic in the Moonlight (cringe) and the first production stills have also been unveiled. That’s one, above, and there’s a good shot of Firth below. Read More »

I may not have been wild about Park Chan-Wook‘s English-language debut, Stoker, but there are definite pleasures within. Among them are the performances from the supporting cast. Jacki Weaver shows up for a bit, as does Dermot Mulroney. Neither has featured in a big way in the marketing so far, as each has a relatively small part to play in the film. But this featurette, which offers a behind the scenes look at the greater Stoker family, gives each some time in front of the camera. (Of course there’s plenty from the films star cast, too — Mia Wasikowska, Nicole Kidman, and Matthew Goode.) Read More »

To coincide with its long-awaited Sundance debut, Chan-wook Park‘s Stoker has just unveiled a new international trailer. The first English-language outing from the Oldboy auteur stars Mia Wasikowska as India, a teenage girl mourning the death of her father (Dermot Mulroney). The unexpected arrival of her mysterious Uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode) further complicates matters, especially as he seems to have taken an unhealthy interest in both India and her chilly mother Evelyn (Nicole Kidman). Watch the new video after the jump.

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The title Stoker suggests vampirism, as a play on the name of Dracula creator Bram Stoker. But the monsters in this film are purely human — people warped into terrible shapes by neglect and jealousy.

For his English-language debut, Oldboy direcotor Park Chan-Wook chose Stoker, a script by actor Wentworth Miller that revolves around a family suffering the pain of change after a significant death. Evie Stoker and her daughter India barely have a moment to come to terms with the untimely passing of husband/father Michael, when his long-lost brother Charlie shows up. Charlie is so long-lost that the rest of the family barely knew of his existence. But it isn’t long before he has insinuated himself into the broken household, and is toying with the affections of lonely Evie and rapidly maturing India.

There’s an influence from Hitchcock — the imposition of a long-lost Uncle Charlie can’t help but conjure thoughts of Shadow of a Doubt — but Stoker doesn’t feel like a Hitchcock film at all. Unfortunately, it doesn’t feel much like a classic Park film, either. There’s lush cinematography to spare, and a strikingly vivid color palette, yes. As a story or character portrait, however, Stoker is resoundingly hollow. Read More »