Ant-Man and the Wasp Early Buzz

Late Friday night, the first reactions to Marvel’s latest superhero sequel hit the web.

Ant-Man and the Wasp has been screened for critics, and the first reactions from social media have started to surface. So far, the buzz is pretty damn high with many calling it fun and hilarious, praising the creative use of size (both big and small), and one reaction even thinks it’s Marvel’s best sequel since Captain America: The Winter Soldier. That sounds like high praise, so without further adieu, we’ll let the reactions speak for themselves. Read More »

Superfly review

When Sony announced it was making a modern, Atlanta-set version of Super Fly (re-styling it as Superfly), it didn’t come as a surprise. We’re in the midst of a blaxploitation craze. Tons of film and television projects are in development based upon 1970s black action movies – films that were often criticized for their stereotypical portrayals of black people, but applauded for bringing stories centered on black people into the spotlight.

A new Shaft film starring Jessie T. Usher will be released in 2019. Underground co-creator Misha Green is developing a new Cleopatra Jones film at Warner Bros. Power creator Courtney Kemp was recently developing a reboot of Get Christie Love! starring Kylie Bunbury, and Hulu is reportedly working on a reboot of Foxy Brown starring Meagan Good.

Since the project was first announced, I was never completely against a Super Fly remake. If updated to modern times and made like a Power-esque crime drama, I always thought there could be a market for it. But just because I thought it could work doesn’t mean we actually needed a remake. Read More »

second half of jurassic world fallen kingdom

When the film he was reviewing would demand it, the late Roger Ebert would retell an old story he’d once heard. It was about a child prodigy, gifted at playing the piano, who was lucky enough to meet one of the old masters to perform. And so he did, skillfully getting every part of a famously tricky composition correct in his performance. When the child finished, the old master patted him on the head and said, “You know the notes. One day, maybe you will know the music.”

That’s a line that’s hard to ignore when watching the chaotic Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, the second new film in the franchise that knows the notes without getting any of the music correct. This movie is chock-full of references to Steven Spielberg’s modern classic, all of which are simply reminders that this material has been done much better before.

Read More »

Incredibles 2 Spoiler Review

The Incredibles arrived on the scene in 2004 when superheroes were taking off at the box office, but hadn’t ventured into the behemoth of success that would come with the beginning of the Marvel Cinematic Universe just four years later. Now that 14 years have passed since the original, the superhero game is well-tread and seasoned territory. But leave it to the geniuses at Pixar Animation to craft a superhero sequel that is positively superb simply because it isn’t your average superhero movie.

What made The Incredibles stand out in the first place was the fact that it was about family first. It just so happens the Parr family were special because every one of them had super powers (except Jack-Jack at the time). Unfortunately, Bob (aka Mr. Incredible) and Helen (aka Elastigirl) decided to start a family after superheroes were declared illegal, forcing their kids Dash and Violet to hide their super powers. Unlike the rest of the world around them, this family can’t do the things that make them special.

Incredibles 2 partially deals with this same issue as the family faces the prospect of their heroic actions still being deemed not only illegal, but also unwanted by the general public, thanks to the perception presented by politicians ensuring that people only see the destruction they’ve caused and not the good they’ve done. However, all that is an excuse to put pressure on The Incredibles as a family, to change up the dynamic so that each of the characters can grow in their own way. And it’s accompanied by some amazingly well-crafted and thrilling action adventure. Read More »

gotti reviews

Critics have whacked Gotti, the new mob movie starring John Travolta as the Teflon Don. 45 producers (!) struggled for almost a decade to bring this biopic to the big screen. Perhaps they should’ve waited a little bit longer – Gotti reviews have earned the movie a rare 0% on Rotten Tomatoes.

Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

Tag review

Tag is built on a foundation that most will likely find familiar. A bunch of childhood friends, now in middle age, persist in playing a game of tag despite the growing distance — literal and metaphorical — between them. In other words, it’s another tale of arrested development. But it’s got a few distinct things going for it that set it apart from the rest of the crowd.

Read More »

Hereditary Spoiler Review

(In our Spoiler Reviews, we take a deep dive into a new release and get to the heart of what makes it tick…and every story point is up for discussion. In this entry: Ari Aster’s Hereditary.)

In its opening days, Hereditary has sailed past tracking expectations and earned A24 its biggest weekend release yet. Ari Aster’s indie horror film has been generating conversation since its January Sundance screening, and now that it’s on nearly three thousand screens, that conversation has gotten a lot louder.

And there’s plenty to talk about when it comes to Hereditary: the soul-chilling performances, the elegant and unusual art design, that balls-out (uhm, literally) ending no one saw coming. But under the polished, cinematic horror of Hereditary is a rougher, truer horror, one that will stay with audiences long past that shocking conclusion.

The real horror of Hereditary is in its relentless, unblinking look at family dysfunction.

Read More »

The charms of Pixar Animation Studios’ first wave of original films have been replaced in the 2010s by a barrage of sequels. Their early films felt fresh. Even though the company’s third film was the beloved Toy Story 2, Pixar avoided the Hollywood impulse of turning into a sequel factory. But recently, they’ve made Cars 2, Cars 3, Monsters University, and Finding Dory, which mostly failed to live up to expectations.

Now, we have Incredibles 2, whose writer/director Brad Bird is only a few years removed from the live-action flop Tomorrowland. So, it’s not wrong to wonder if the new adventures of the superheroic Parr family would feel creatively uninspired. Happily, while Incredibles 2 doesn’t reach the same heights as the 2004 original, it’s more intelligent than other recent sequels.

Read More »

believer review

Believer has all the hallmarks of what you’d expect from a drug crime movie: a femme fatale, an untrustworthy ally, multiple severed limbs, and even more gut-churning twists. And while Believer somewhat subscribes to the character types and recognizable tropes of the genre, the twists feel fresh enough and the tangled webs of drug world conspiracies are riveting enough to keep you on the edge of your seat.

Director Lee Hae-young‘s remake of the Johnnie To film Drug War transports the story from Hong Kong to South Korea, giving To’s gritty crime thriller a sleek and moody makeover that alternates between fits of cartoonish violence and moments of poignant contemplation. But while the basic beats of To’s 2012 film are there, Lee takes Believer to another level of brutal introspection — which sometimes works.

Read More »

Hotel Artemis Review

Every character in Hotel Artemis is operating on a different wavelength and, to quote an old Bethesda answer, it seems to be both a feature and a bug.

Part of it has to do with the movie’s premise. The hotel is a hospital for criminals, and in exchange for keeping up with their membership fees and surrendering their weapons before coming in, they get patched up and left alone for the duration of their stay. As such, it makes sense that the rogue’s gallery that’s assembled in Drew Pearce’s film would all be working towards their own ends instead of presenting a unified front, but the sense of fracturing runs a little deeper than that. These performances all belong in different movies.

Read More »