the gentlemen review

The Gentlemen is being touted as a return to form for Guy Ritchie — not the director behind blockbuster bombs like King Arthur or tepid Disney live-action remakes like Aladdin, but the electric, raucous auteur behind Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch. And Ritchie is aware of this going into The Gentlemen, a contemporary gangster movie that has a sense of timelessness to it. But The Gentlemen is very much about the times, or rather, a time gone by: the era in which gangsters did things the old, mean, dirty way. But the times, they are a’changing, and a new guard of gangsters — represented by a delightfully unhinged Henry Golding — threatens to upend the balance. Or do they?

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weathering with you review

Makoto Shinkai is a filmmaker whose heart lies with the cosmos. The Your Name director looks at the world through a lens so expansive that sometimes humans can get lost in it — his earliest films more often than not forgot about the character and favored the awe inspired by natural phenomena: meteor showers, typhoons, the unchanging rhythm of the seasons. Like Hayao Miyazaki, who Shinkai has frequently been compared to as the anime legend’s widely regarded successor, Shinkai bows to the might of nature — though his films don’t have quite the deep political messaging as Miyazaki’s.

Shinkai’s strengths lie in his breathtaking animated tributes to the power of nature, rendered in stunning photorealistic animation, and the ripples that natural phenomena send to affect the little people on Earth. It’s why his early films would often feel cold and distant, and his characters vague outlines of people. But with the globally successful Your Name, Shinkai gained a sense of humor. He found a funny bone, a perfect compromise between his cosmic ambition and his intimate character writing. He swings even further in that lighthearted direction with Weathering With You, a whimsical supernatural romance with a pointed environmental message that is even more vibrant than his 2016 mega-hit, but doesn’t quite pack the same emotional wallop.

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dolittle review

Everyone was a little baffled when Robert Downey Jr. chose to follow his career-defining role as Tony Stark in the Marvel Cinematic Universe with…Dolittle. It turns out, they were right to be. The Stephen Gaghan-directed family adventure film reboots the Doctor Dolittle films, which last saw Eddie Murphy taking on the role of the animal-talking doctor in the 1998 modern-day comedy and its sequels. But Gaghan’s new film, like the 1967 musical starring Rex Harrison, takes more direct inspiration from the Hugh Lofting children’s novels set in the Victorian era. And like the infamously embattled Harrison film, it is a haphazard mess.

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bad boys for life review

Three things are essential to the Bad Boys franchise – or at least, they used to be. One is an often alarming cruelty – a disregard for anyone, and anything, all in the name of a near-sociopathic attempt at coolness. The second is what is commonly referred to as Bayhem – the wild, swirling, often incoherent action beats created by director Michael Bay. The third, and perhaps most essential, is the banter – and bickering – between leads Will Smith and Martin Lawrence.

What makes Bad Boys for Life, the third and presumably final chapter in this series, so special is the jettisoning of the first two elements while embracing the third. Bay is no longer in the director’s chair, and the overall nastiness – which was ramped up to the nth degree in Bad Boys II – is nowhere to be found. But that interplay between Smith and Lawrence is ever-present, and endlessly entertaining.

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like a boss review

Rose Byrne and Tiffany Haddish are both proven supporting players in raunchy R-rated comedies whose charisma is so strong, whose timing is so sharp, and whose deliveries are so hilarious that they have frequently threatened to upstage their leads. Byrne has played all manner of comedy wife or snobby socialite, while there isn’t an outrageous BFF that Haddish hasn’t been called up for. So put two and two together, and it sounds like you’ve got a buddy-comedy pairing for the ages, right?

Not so much. While Byrne and Haddish both sparkle onscreen in Like A Boss, which gives them the rare chance to be the leads for once (or at least to not have their name billed second to Seth Rogen or Kevin Smith), but they are ill-served by a generic workplace comedy movie.

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underwater review

How can such a predictable movie be so damn refreshing? In the storytelling department, Underwater is all washed-up, falling back on waterlogged horror cliches and heavily indebted to flicks like AlienThe Abyss, and The Descent. You know exactly where this freakshow is going from frame one. You know there will be loud clanging sounds against metal hulls. You know there will be trips down dark, soggy corridors. You know some wriggly wet monstrosity will rear its ugly head. This is paint-by-numbers moviemaking. And yet…it’s an absolute blast?

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the grudge review

The soggy scares of The Grudge are reborn yet again, this time in the hands of Nicolas Pesce, director of the horrifying The Eyes of My Mother. Pesce has a real knack for nasty nightmarish imagery, so handing him this franchise isn’t the worst idea in the world. At least on paper. Unfortunately, even though the filmmaker is working with a strong cast while conjuring up some haunting imagery, this Grudge fails to justify itself.

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Invisible Life Review

There came a point early on in Karim Aïnouz’s drama of separated sisters, Invisible Life, where I wondered if the way he depicted a scene veered a little too sharply into the melodramatic and borderline hysterical. Then I remembered how the poster billed the film: a tropical melodrama. Once I reset my bearings a bit, I found the narrative quite engrossing and the story rather moving.

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In the year of our Ford 2019, trying to make sense of people’s wildly divergent Star Wars opinions opens up a murky frontier of epistemological questions that Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, in theaters now, only complicates all the more. Epistemology concerns the nature of knowledge and justified belief. I believe that people believe what they believe when they share their Star Wars opinions but I often wonder how they acquired those opinions in the first place. There’s a precedent for Jedi mind tricks in the Star Wars universe and it leaves me questioning whether some opinions were planted in people’s minds, Kenobi-style, or whether they were genuine reactions that people formed on their own. Like, “Hey, have you Change.org petitioners perchance been inceptioned by the Kremlin?” Or, “Hmm. You journos been getting all chummy with Rian Johnson, listening to him sing subliminal karaoke at film festival bars?”

Discussing Disney’s sequel Star Wars trilogy online is like venturing into a mad minefield decorated with the same bad blood as George Lucas’s prequel trilogy. As the young Lando Calrissian tells us in his Grammy-winning music video: this is America. When J.J. Abrams stepped back into the director’s chair for The Rise of Skywalker, there was always the lingering fear that a big ol’ landmine was planted right under that chair, just waiting to detonate. In 2015, Abrams rescued the franchise, restoring its cultural clout with the $2 billion success of The Force Awakens. Now, he’s essentially trying to re-rescue the franchise from a re-polluted water cooler. This translates visually when The Rise of Skywalker introduces an ocean moon that’s polluted with the wreckage of the second Death Star.

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little women review

Ever since I was a little girl, I hated Amy March. I hated everything the youngest March sister in Louisa May Alcott’s 1868 novel Little Women represented: from her preening vanity, to her obsession with men, to the way life came so easy to her because of her beauty and youth — and of course, the manuscript-burning incident. Like many a Little Women reader, I connected most with Jo, the tomboyish writer who dreams of becoming an independent woman. Alcott too showed a preference for Jo — the de facto protagonist of the book was the feminist stand-in for the author. Jo was easy to like, or at least, easy to aspire to. Every Little Women fan thought themselves to be as strong-willed and smart as Jo, making it easy to look down on an empty-headed brat like Amy.

Alcott may not have intended it, but there was an internalized misogyny in how readers viewed Amy — arguably one of the most hated characters in literature. Jo fit so snugly into the tomboyish hero mold, while Amy was placed in direct contrast to her. The feature film and TV adaptations of Alcott’s post-Civil War era classic would often take on this uncharitable view of Amy too, with little more to her arc than the infamous manuscript-burning and her fall through the ice. Most characters in the Little Women adaptations were tertiary to Jo anyways, the independent, romantic hero who “wasn’t like other girls.” But Greta Gerwig‘s immensely warm and big-hearted 2019 adaptation of Little Women displays the richest understanding of all the different women in the story and performs the greatest miracle: recontextualizes vain, spoiled, silly Amy into one of the most compelling characters of the film.

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