The Best Werewolf Movies You’ve Never Seen

(Welcome to The Best Movies You’ve Never Seen, a series that takes a look at slightly more obscure, under-the-radar, or simply under-appreciated movies. This week things get hairy as we go digging for some underseen werewolf gems!)

There are seemingly thousands of movies about vampires and zombies, but for some reason the werewolf doesn’t quite warrant the same degree of ubiquity. It’s arguably the cooler creature, but therein rests the reason why there are so few werewolf movies – and even fewer good to great ones. You can’t just toss some plastic teeth in an actor’s mouth or paint their skin gray. Werewolves require prosthetic effects/transformations, and they don’t come cheap. (Well, usually.) The advent and availability of inexpensive CG has seen a minor burst in the sub-genre in recent years, but quality-wise they’re more hairballs than hairy nightmares.

If the top tier of great werewolf films features An American Werewolf in London (1981), The Howling (1981), and Universal’s The Wolf Man (1941) then the next includes killer but less popular movies like Silver Bullet (1985), Bad Moon (1996), Ginger Snaps (2000), Dog Soldiers (2002), and Late Phases (2014). And then what? Seventy or so mostly forgettable tales of lycanthropes on the prowl? Yes, but there are also a handful of good ones you’ve probably missed! And I shouldn’t have to say this, but after seeing far, far too many lists including them I’m going to remind you that, while great, neither Wolfen (1981) nor Brotherhood of the Wolf (2001) are werewolf movies.

Keep reading for a look at six good to great – and even lesser known – werewolf movies that deserve a bite out of your time.

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Mia Wasikowska has been set to star in Madame Bovary, directed by Sophie Barthes (Cold Souls) from a script Rose Barreneche adapted from the Gustave Flaubert story. This version is called a “fresh retelling” of the novel that emphasizes modern and youthful themes, even as the story remains basically the same: Emma Bovary (Wasikowska) marries a small-town doctor to get away from her father’s even smaller farm, then has affairs to escape the dreariness of her marriage.

Paul Giamatti is also attached to the movie; he would be Monsieur Homais, the town druggist and friend of Bovary’s husband, who threatens to expose her actions. We won’t see this one for a while, but Wasikowska does have several projects coming up: Park Chan-Wook’s Stoker, John Hillocat’s Lawless (formerly The Wettest County) and will next shoot Richard Ayoade’s The Double. That’s an impressive upcoming slate. [Variety]

After the break, Amanda Peet is mixed up in Identity Theft, and Simon Quarterman goes after a cheapo werewolf. Read More »

Early this year the film The Devil Inside became a strange sensation. Released in the dead of January and powered by an unexpectedly successful marketing campaign, the film took in a $53m domestic haul even as it left many audiences unsatisfied at the end. The film became only the sixth to earn an ‘F’ CinemaScore; the CinemaScore system tracks audience satisfaction, but doesn’t necessarily correlate to the quality of the film. (The other Fs were Solaris, Bug, Wolf Creek, Darkness, and Richard Kelly’s The Box.)

With that sort of financial return — the film cost only a million bucks — director William Brent Bell and co-writer Matthew Peterman became a hot ticket. Now FilmDistrict may end up distributing the duo’s next film, a horror thriller called WER. Read More »