The Oath Teaser Trailer

Chicago native Ike Barinholtz has made a career out of scene stealing, from his earliest days as an improv performer with Improv Olympic and Second City (among others) and a cast member on MadTV in the early 2000s to bigger television roles in Eastbound & Down to The Mindy Project. In more recent years, Barinholtz landed sizable supporting roles in Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising, Suicide Squad, Snatched, the Netflix film Bright, and a very funny turn in Blockers earlier this year.

But his latest work, The Oath, not only features his largest role to date, but it also marks his debut as a writer/director of a film that is part dark comedy, part family drama, and eventually, part high-tension thriller. Set primarily over the 24-hours surrounding a Thanksgiving feast hosted by Barinholtz’s Chris and wife Kai (Tiffany Haddish, in a wonderfully dialed-back performance) at their home, the story involves the (fictional) president wanting every American to sign a loyalty oath to the country.

As the nation grows closer to the oath’s Black Friday deadline, tensions and conflicts are on the rise, and while the oath is said to be voluntary, those who refuse to sign are treated like criminals and traitors. Imagine that, and then put the pressure of preparing a meal the entire family, which includes Chris’s mom (Nora Dunn), brother (Jon Barinholtz, Ike’s real-life sibling) and his instigator girlfriend (Meredith Hagner), sister (Carrie Brownstein) and her sickly husband (Jay Duplass). The situation spins out of control when two government agents (John Cho and Billy Magnussen) arrive at the front door. The film feels timely, relevant, and works as a genuine conversation starter. More importantly, The Oath makes me genuinely interesting to see what Barinholtz does next as a filmmaker.

/Film spoke to Barinholtz recently in Chicago about The Oath and how much of it was based on real-life conversations/arguments amongst his friends and family, the inspiration behind the film “loyalty oath,” and how he made sure the film found ways to poke fun at both conservatives and liberals who watch too much 24-hour news. The film is now playing in select theaters. 

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the oath trailer

Ike Barinholtz makes his directorial debut with The Oath, a dark political comedy that hits a little too close to home. The premise itself is a little outrageous: a Thanksgiving dinner, typically the setting for some tense family stand-offs, turns violent when politics come into the fray. But the reason for this escalation of one of the worst family gatherings of the year is a controversial White House policy that honestly could be enacted in the real world.

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Trailer Round-Up 1

It’s time to catch up with all of the trailers we’ve missed in the past few days, and boy, are there a lot of them this week. Strap in, because you’re about to see a new look at a Gerard Butler thriller, an HBO comedy, a Vincent Van Gogh biopic, a mainstream holiday comedy, and a ton of new Netflix content, including a Quincy Jones documentary and an animated series from the team that brought you Avatar: The Last Airbender. And that’s just the start.
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The Oath Teaser Trailer

Thanksgiving is a wonderful holiday when families gather to feast and enjoy fellowship with each other. It’s also a time when you can’t help but get into an argument about politics with your extended family, creating tension in the household as you aggressively eat your pumpkin pie. Well, that dreaded conversation is about to get a whole lot worse thanks to a new comedy.

The Oath, a new film starring Ike Barinholtz and Tiffany Haddish from the producers of Get Out and BlacKkKlansman, unfolds at Thanksgiving in the wake of an unprecedented decision by the government asking citizens to sign a loyalty oath to the President of the United States of America. What the hell does that mean? We’re not sure, but The Oath teaser trailer will certainly make you feel like you’re home for the holidays. Read More »

2010 Gotham Independent Film Awards Winners

Tonight, the Independent Filmmaker Project (IFP) held the 20th Anniversary Gotham Independent Film Awards ceremony in New York City’s Cipriani Wall Street. The winners were comprised mostly of films which played earlier this year at the Sundance Film Festival. A total of 30 films received nominations in seven competitive categories, including: Best Feature, Best Documentary, Breakthrough Director, Breakthrough Actor, Best Ensemble Performance, Festival Genius Audience Award and Best Film Not Playing at a Theater Near You®. Hit the jump to read the full list of winners and the official press release.

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Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: I celebrate all levels of trailers and hopefully this column will satisfactorily give you a baseline of what beta wave I’m operating on, because what better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? Some of the best authors will tell you that writing a short story is a lot harder than writing a long one, that you have to weigh every sentence. What better medium to see how this theory plays itself out beyond that than with movie trailers?

Read More »

Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: I celebrate all levels of trailers and hopefully this column will satisfactorily give you a baseline of what beta wave I’m operating on, because what better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? Some of the best authors will tell you that writing a short story is a lot harder than writing a long one, that you have to weigh every sentence. What better medium to see how this theory plays itself out beyond that than with movie trailers?

Read More »