downhill review

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic grows and more businesses and movie theaters close, Hollywood studios have been left with nowhere to drop their theatrical releases. While some studios chose to delay their biggest feature films until the worst of the pandemic passes, a few studios decided to break the monotony of everyone’s self-isolation (and help keep a few kids entertained) by releasing their theatrical films on digital platforms early. Most films available to buy digitally about 74 days after they first arrive in theaters, but studios are breaking that tradition by releasing their films on VOD mere weeks after, or even on the same day of, the theatrical debut.

Here is an ongoing list of the films that have been or will be released early.

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Amazon Prime Cinema

With almost all the movie theaters closed around the United States, movie studios are releasing some recent and upcoming theatrical releases on VOD much further in advance than usual. Universal Pictures was the first to take a step in this direction, and they’ll be shaking things up even more when they release Trolls: World Tour on VOD on the same date it was intended to be released in theaters. Since then, other studios have followed suit with movies like Sonic the Hedgehog and Bloodshot arriving on VOD early. So Amazon has unveiled a dedicated space for them to be featured, and it’s called Amazon Prime Cinema.

As for how the former theatrical releases of movies like The Invisible Man and Onward are faring so far, it’s only Disney’s latest Pixar Animation adventure that seems to have cracked Top 10 lists. Instead, it’s the cheaper VOD movies that were more recently released on home video have been dominating the charts. Get the lowdown below. Read More »

The Invisible Man live tweet

Earlier this week, NBCUniversal became the first major Hollywood studio to shatter the traditional theatrical window by announcing that some of its films which recently debuted in theaters would be heading to VOD on an accelerated timeline. Each of those films – Focus Features’ Emma., and Universal Pictures’ The Hunt and The Invisible Man – are available to rent today due to the unusual circumstances of the coronavirus, and the filmmakers behind all three movies are participating in live tweets of their respective projects to help celebrate this odd occasion.
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/Filmcast Ep. 558 – The Invisible Man

the invisible man review 2020

David, Devindra, and Jeff talk about the impact of COVID-19 on the movie industry. For the feature review, the cast reviews The Invisible Man, a Blumhouse produced horror written and directed by Leigh Whannell. Does this reboot revive Universal’s Dark Universe?

Thanks to our sponsors this week: Quip and Light Stream

Listen and subscribe to David’s newest podcast Culturally Relevant and subscribe to his YouTube channel. Check out Jeff Cannata’s D&D show Dungeon Run. Listen to Devindra’s podcast with Engadget on all things tech.

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Also, follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook.
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weekend box office the invisible man

The Invisible Man is a huge hit, and I have no follow-up snark or joke to go with this news. I’m just legitimately happy. Leigh Whannell is a great filmmaker, and I’m thrilled to see audiences connecting with his latest, which is scary, intense, and exceptionally well-made. It’s certainly a stark contrast between the last time Universal tried to reboot one of their classic monsters with The Mummy. Strong reviews and word-of-mouth helped the fright flick open above expectations, and all but ensured that Universal will continue to try to dust off their old horror hits.

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the invisible man clips

We, as a culture, are trained to poke holes in a woman’s story, to sympathize with the monster in the scenario, rather than the victim. Knowing this, director Leigh Whannell uses the vehicle of horror cinema to Trojan horse a moral lesson into a fun Blumhouse thriller. His latest film, The Invisible Man, an Elisabeth Moss-led Universal Monster reboot in which an ex-lover stalks his old beau by hiding in plain sight, is another way of relaying the fear traumatized women feel when formerly safe spaces become violated. It is somehow both edge-of-your-seat excitement and razor sharp metaphorical commentary – a brilliant new take on an old classic.

The director sat down with us to talk about gaslighting, politics, exes, building a beautiful prison, The Munsters, paranoid thrillers, abusive relationships, and the way in which Whannell weaponizes empty spaces to keep the audience off-kilter. 

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Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker 16-Bit Ending

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, watch a 16-bit video game style recreation of the final showdown in between the Final Order and the Resistance, as well as Rey and Emperor Palpatine, in Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker. Plus, listen as director Leigh Whannell breaks down an intense scene from the remake of The Invisible Man, and watch a sketch cut from last weekend’s episode of Saturday Night Live with John Mulaney starring in a parody of the new Netflix dating series Love Is Blind. Read More »

Leigh Whannell Blumhouse Deal

Director Leigh Whannell is having an outstanding weekend. Not only is the filmmaker’s remake of the classic Universal monster movie The Invisible Man at the top of the box office with a $29 million debut on a budget of just $7 million, but now he’s striking a two-year first look deal with the film’s producer Jason Blum and his horror movie factory Blumhouse. Could this possibly pave the way for Whannell overseeing a proper reboot of Universal’s movie monster universe? Read More »

Classic Invisible Man

We live in an era of franchises, filled with an abundance of sequels and every studio wanting their own shared cinematic universe. But while the big franchises of today are mostly comic-book, Star Wars and action movies like Fast and Furious – with a couple of horror ones here and there like the highly successful Conjuring universe – back in the 1930s the biggest cinematic universe belonged to the misunderstood monsters of the Universal Classic Monsters movies. But while Boris Karloff’s portrayal of Frankenstein’s Monster, or Bela Lugosi’s Dracula have remained iconic representations of this classic horror era, there is one truly horrific monster that usually can’t be found in the picture – Claude Rains’ The Invisible Man. Read More »

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the invisible man review 2020

Is this the first real horror movie of the #MeToo era? Leigh Whannell‘s nerve-jangling The Invisible Man bears almost no resemblance to the 1933 Universal pic starring Claude Rains, nor does it take much from the original H. G. Wells novel of the same name. About the only thing Whannell’s modern-day update has in common with those titles is that it involves a dangerous, and invisible, man. But with that basic set-up, Whannell has crafted a surprisingly timely tale of an abused, terrified woman fighting like hell to convince everyone around her she’s telling the truth.

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