Redbox, the DVD rental kiosk company owned by Coinstar, has been steadily encroaching on the market share of Netflix and storefront DVD rental shops for the past few years. The company’s biggest promise, the details of which have so far remained a mystery, is the eventual launch of a streaming service that will compete directly with similar offerings from Netflix, Amazon, iTunes and other companies.

Today Rebox announced that it has partnered with Verizon to make this streaming service a reality. The venture, which is currently unnamed, will charge customers a monthly subscription fee for which they’ll be able to take DVDs from Redbox kiosks, and access streaming catalogue film titles, with that aspect of the business powered by Verizon’s existing digital infrastructure. Read More »

At $1 per night, Redbox DVD rentals have been one of the cheapest ways to check out a DVD release. And at $1.15 to $1.20 per night, the company’s prices would remain low. Indeed, that price increase is starting to roll out in some markets — Redbox customers in Austin, TX and Portland, OR will face 15-20% price increases on regular DVDs as the company takes recent Netflix price hikes as an indication that the market can bear higher fees. Read More »

As traditional video rental stores slowly go the way of the Dodo, current industry leaders are looking for ways to stay ahead of the curve. Leading the pack is Netflix, which allows customers to rent DVDs through the mail and stream select titles online. One of their main competitors, Redbox, offers customers the ability to rent DVDs from red kiosks at popular locations for $1 per day and that’s all. Because of those limitations, Redbox has regularly found themselves well-behind Netflix. They’re hoping to change that soon though. Redbox just announced they’ll soon be creating a subscription based service that includes both the physical DVD rentals as well as online streaming content. Would you like to know more? Read More »

The few of us who still watch live television know the commercials well. People in the airport, at a restaurant and in dentist’s office, all being told they need to wait 28 days. “Why wait 28 days for new releases? Blockbuster has hot new releases … 28 days before Netflix and Redbox.” Or so they did.

Fast Company is reporting that Blockbuster has buckled and signed deals with Warner Brothers, Universal and 20th Century Fox to get new releases in their kiosks 28 days after the initial DVD release date, just like Redbox and Netflix. This is only in the Blockbuster kiosks, mind you, their stores will continue to get new releases when they’re new. Still, this is yet another blow to the struggling video rental company. More details after the jump. Read More »

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This week, David Chen, Devindra Hardawar and Adam Quigley dwell on the execrable It’s Pat, ponder the ethics of “gay” jokes, and evince ambivalent feelings towards artificial scarcity in the home video market. Special guest Laremy Legel joins us from film.com.

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Join us on Sunday (11/14) at 10 PM EST / 7 PM PST at Slashfilm’s live page as we review Skyline.

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Toy Story 3 Brazilian PosterThis week, David Chen, Devindra Hardawar, and Adam Quigley get extremely disappointed by Jonah Hex, speculate on the prospects of a Ghost Rider sequel, and wonder when movie studios will start delivering movies to people when they want, in the ways that they want them. Special guest Greg Mariotti joins us from Pixar Talk.

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Join us next week on Monday night at Slashfilm’s live page as we review Knight and Day.

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Over the past few months, movie studios like Universal and Warner Bros. have decided that the best way to increase their DVD revenue is to establish exclusive ‘sell-through’ windows for new films. So we’ve seen Netflix agree to wait 28 days before sending new Warner Bros. films to subscribers, and Fox and Universal have filed lawsuits against Redbox to control how the company stocks the studios’ films in kiosks.

But Paramount has done some research and come to different conclusions from WB and other studios. In a rare example of a studio doing something that makes sense, Paramount is eliminating any exclusive windows and allowing Redbox to stock the studio’s DVDs from day one. In other words: Paramount is doing business the way it should be done. Read More »

Redbox

I’ve become fascinated by the war going on between movie studios like Universal and Fox, Redbox and Netflix. The DVD is such an important part of the studio finance equation that these companies are jumping through all sorts of hoops to control how discs are disseminated to the public. Fortunately for us, those hoops are on fire, and the result is a little digital media circus played out before our very eyes.

One of the most entertaining stories of late is that Redbox has circumvented studio litigation by sending employees out to buy large quantities of DVD at retail. Fox and Universal won’t currently sell discs to the company, but Wal Mart will sell DVDs to anyone, including Redbox employees. But now Wal Mart and Target will only sell five discs to any one person during a specified window. And they’re going to enforce this…how? Read More »

Redbox Pulls Deadline Art Featuring Brittany Murphy

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Whenever a celebrity dies, particularly in the entertainment industry, the way to handle their final works (as well as works that reference or relate to them) is often a tricky one. With Brittany Murphy’s recent death, we’ve already seen this principle in action: Several weeks ago, Saturday Night Live aired a Weekend Update sketch lampooning Murphy’s public persona, portraying her as loopy and completely out of it. Upon her death, NBC quietly removed the clip from Hulu, although it is still available online.

We’ve also recently learned that movie rental company Redbox has pulled the art for Murphy’s 2009 film, Deadline, which features a chilling image of the actress lifeless in a bathtub.

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Cool Posts From Around the Web:

Redbox

A new study has been published by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp that claims the one-dollar DVD rentals from Redbox kiosks have cost Hollywood one billion dollars, and that the economic fallout could get a lot worse as home video revenue losses spur job cuts and wipe out up to $400m in wages. I think it’s time for studios to give Tommy Wiseau his first real big Hollywood gig — he could do ads parodying his famous cries from The Room, in protest of the DVD rental kiosks. “You are tearing me apart, Redbox!” Read More »