The Other Side of the Wind Review

The Other Side of the Wind is finally complete — or rather “complete.” Nominally. The final film by the great Orson Welles (assuming The Deep never sees the light of day) begins with a title card explaining that this version, restored by the folks at Netflix, exists as “an attempt to honor and complete” Welles’ original vision, the key word being “attempt.” With so much footage left un-shot and unedited during its original production, no version of the film today can feel truly whole. And yet, despite its haphazard meandering, The Other Side of the Wind, in the form it will now be known, is a fascinating meta-textual artifact on the very piecing together of art and intention. Read More »

the other side of the wind trailer

Orson Welles spent a large part of the 1970s trying to finish his film The Other Side of the Wind. Financial problems plagued the production, and while Welles claimed he managed to complete 96% of the film, he was never able to raise enough money to finish the job. Now, over 40 years later, The Other Side of the Wind has been completed, and it’s coming to Netflix. Watch the Other Side of the Wind trailer below.

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the other side of the wind theatrical release

Netflix may not be too keen on theatrical releases, but they’re willing to make an exception for Orson Welles. The streaming service is releasing a new cut of Welles’ unfinished final film The Other Side of the Wind, and they’ve decided to put the film in a few theaters as well.

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great newsroom movies

In honor of Steven Spielberg‘s new newspaper drama The Post, we’ve combed through the archives, pounded the pavement, dusted off the typewriter and put together a list of some of the best newsroom movies fit to print. It’s a list comprised of both crusading, truth-seeking journalists and career opportunists willing to bend the truth as long as it makes for a great story. The connective tissue holding these films together is the ever-present newsroom, where typewriters sing and the truth lives or dies when a story goes to the presses.

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orson welles

Filmmaker Orson Welles has left behind two holy grails for film aficionados to chase. One is the footage cut from his original version of The Magnificent Ambersons, which as far as anyone can tell, doesn’t exist anymore. The other is The Other Side of the Wind, which is the long-uncompleted final film from Welles. Frank Marshall, who served as a Production Manager on the original production, has been trying to get this important film completed for over forty years, and now the Indiana Jones producer has finally found a partner to make this dream a reality.

Netflix has acquired global rights and will finance the completion and restoration of the legendary filmmaker Orson Welles’ last film, The Other Side of the Wind. Get the full details, after the jump.

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100 Greatest American Films

Everyone now and then, someone takes the time to round up a new list of 100 of the greatest films of all time, and it always stirs up some debate, even though probably 75% of the list is the same as any other. A new list from BBC Culture, however, is a little different, because the news organization from across the pond has rounded up a list of the 100 Greatest American Films, as voted on by an international assembly of film critics.

Some of your favorites like The Dark Knight, Star Wars, Back to the Future and Jaws made the cut, but there are only two films from the past five years, and only five total from the 21st century. The top films likely won’t surprise you, but there are still some questionable inclusions and exclusions on this list.

See the full list after the jump! Read More »

Orson Welles Documentary Magician

Maybe I’m guessing wrong, but it feels like Orson Welles has fallen away from his perch at the top of the list of the most fascinating American filmmakers. We’re a couple decades removed from the prominence of the people who kept him in the conversation; other filmmakers have dominated the conversation as dialogue about film has changed. We’ve seen Citizen Kane fall from first to second on Sight and Sound’s once-a-decade list of the 50 Greatest Films of All Time. (Kane held the #1 spot for fifty years.)

No matter how many other filmmakers do things that Welles did, however, none will ever do everything Welles did, and very few will do it in the way he managed. He wasn’t just there for many of Hollywood’s formative moments, he provided several of them. If you don’t know the history and films of Welles, there’s never a bad time to dive in.

Here’s the trailer for the Orson Welles documentary Magician, which recounts Welles’ life and achievements, featuring interviews with with Richard Linklater, Peter Bogdanovich, Frank Marshall, Anthony Perkins, Martin Scorsese, Sydney Pollack, Steven Spielberg. Read More »

Any fan of cinema must be, I think, necessarily interested in Orson Welles. And for anyone interested in Welles, there are two holy grails. One is the footage cut from his original version of The Magnificent Ambersons. That footage, sadly, simply doesn’t exist any longer. The other grail is The Other Side of the Wind, which is the long-uncompleted final film from Welles.

The movie stars John Huston as declining film director Jake Hannaford, and features a huge cast including Peter Bogdanovich, Bob Random, Susan Strasberg, Joseph McBride, Mercedes McCambirdge, Lilli Palmer, Oja Kodar, Dennis Hopper and a host of filmmakers appearing as (more or less) themselves, including Henry Jaglom, Paul Mazursky, and Claude Chabrol. Featuring many improvised scenes, and shot with an off-the-cuff style, it would have been a free-form experiment unlike anything else in Welles’ catalogue.

Due to a combination of factors, most notably the passing of Welles and a very complicated string of rights negotiations that followed, The Other Side of the Wind has never been finished and released, despite continued efforts to complete it. Some small portions have been shown over the years, but now twenty minutes of additional footage has been made available online. Read More »

What is the greatest film of all time? Orson Welles‘ directorial debut Citizen Kane has often been given the honor, but a new iteration of a poll considered to be one of cinema’s most significant has overturned Kane‘s rule.

When Alfred Hitchcock‘s Vertigo opened in 1958, it met with a middling reception and many negative reviews. In 1968 Robin Wood’s book Hitchcock’s Films was part of the process of critical re-evaluation of the movie, calling it his “masterpiece to date.” In 1973 Vertigo was one of five movies owned by Hitchcock that the director took out of circulation. Vertigo was away from screens for ten years, and in that time interest in the film grew exponentially. When it was finally re-released in ’83, Vertigo was hailed as a classic and an important film.

Once a decade, the British magazine Sight and Sound conducts a poll of critics and filmmakers to generate lists of the ten best films ever made. In 1982, Vertigo hit the critics’ list at #7. In 1992 it had climbed to #4, and in 2002 it was second only to Citizen Kane.

Now, with the release of the 2012 poll, Vertigo has toppled Kane to be voted by critics as the best film ever made. Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

Much as previous generations believe you can tell everything about a person whether or not they love The Beatles or Elvis, you can tell a lot about a film fan depending on their opinions of Citizen Kane. The film is like a lightning rod in the movie blogosphere where you’ve either seen it and love it, respect it, hate it because it’s been built up too much or don’t even care to watch it. No matter which statement best describes you, there’s no denying that Orson Welles‘ 1941 masterpiece set out what it was meant to do: spawn discussion, debate, and show film lovers everywhere just what this little medium we call movies is capable of. Now, 70 years after Kane was released in theaters, Warner Bros. is doing a frame by frame high definition restoration so they can release the film on Blu-ray September 13. Read more about the package after the jump. Read More »