Alamo Drafthouse 2019 Movies Infographic

We’re almost a full month into 2020, but the folks at the Alamo Drafthouse chain of theaters aren’t done looking back on the films of 2019. They’ve been crunching the numbers and they’ve given us an exclusive first look at what their audiences thought were they best films of 2019. Heck, they dug even deeper than that and also collected votes on the best scenes and performances. They also voted on the definitive ranking of all the Star Wars movies, and named their most anticipated movies of 2020.

Check out the entire Alamo Drafthouse 2019 movie infographic below. Read More »

Best Movies Streaming Right Now Midsommar

(Welcome to Now Stream This, a column dedicated to the best movies streaming on Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, and every other streaming service out there.)

It’s time for a whole new year of Now Stream This. In this week’s streaming column, you’ll find one of last year’s best movies, a breezy modern Steven Spielberg movie, a mind-bending blockbuster from Christopher Nolan, a mostly forgotten ’90s thriller, a crime drama, and more. These are the best movies streaming right now.

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Ben Pearson’s Top 10 Movies of 2019

Ben Pearson's Top 10 Movies of 2019

After a rough start, 2019 ended up being a terrific year for film. Several movies which didn’t make my personal list – films like Marriage Story, Toy Story 4, The Last Black Man in San Francisco, Us, Apollo 11, One Cut of the Dead, Uncut Gems, etc. – could easily constitute a separate lineup teeming with its own memorable moments. But, as the saying goes, though there are many [lists] like it, this one is mine. Here are my favorite films of last year.
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Hoai-Tran Bui’s Top 10 Movies of 2019

hoai-tran bui's top 10 movies of 2019

I don’t remember a year where I struggled more to narrow down my favorite movies. It’s almost ridiculous how jam-packed 2019 was with excellent films: from stunning debut features to contemplative epics by masters of their craft, to character dramas that plunged into unimagined depths, to cozy family fables that unexpectedly cut like a knife, to the embarrassment of riches floating in from abroad. Movies had so much to say, and they said it brilliantly.

These are just a few of my favorite things, but even at the last minute I was shuffling this list around. So in honor of those movies that almost made the cut, here are my honorable mentions:  The Irishman, The Lighthouse, Us, Ad Astra, Marriage Story, Varda by Agnes, John Wick Chapter 3, Transit, Long Day’s Journey Into Night.

With that, here are my top 10 movies of 2019.

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Chris Evangelista’s Top 10 Movies of 2019

Chris Evangelista's Top 10 Movies of 2019

It was another great year for movies, where we were blessed by new classics from beloved auteurs and new works of genius from fresh faces. Where sophomore efforts turned out to be magnificent titles in their own right. And, perhaps most interesting of all, where multiple movies conveyed a similar, and timely, “eat the rich” motto. My name is Chris Evangelista, and I approve this message. These are the 10 best movies of 2019, according to me.

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Since 1973, various horror films have tried to replicate the shock of the prototypical human sacrifice movie, The Wicker Man (not to be confused with its gonzo 2006 remake, starring Nicolas Cage, which is perhaps best remembered for the immortal, memeified line, “Not the bees!”) Even the late Robin Hardy, director of the original Wicker Man, went back to the well in 2011 with The Wicker Tree. Most movies, including that one, have failed to recapture the terror of the iconic moment when the protagonist turned sacrificial victim burns alive, surrounded by cult members. However, the 2010s have been bookended by a number of interesting horror films, each of which has managed to reframe the Wicker Man model in different ways.

One of those films, Midsommar, hits Blu-Ray on October 8. Writer-director Ari Aster has called Midsommar “an apocalyptic break-up movie.” Speaking with Empire, he talked about how he tried to avoid The Wicker Man‘s influence, saying, “I think what [Midsommar] tries to do is point to The Wicker Man and set up expectations native to that film, then take a left-turn from there and go somewhere surprising.”

That’s a quote that could apply to other films on this list, too. Of course, this man made of wicker is not escaped easily. In some ways, he’s like the Gingerbread Man: every horror movie that deals in similar tropes seems to be chasing him. Here, we’ll chase The Wicker Man back through his own movie, then back through Midsommar and five other horror films of the 2010s. How have recent fright flicks approached the timeless subject of secret cults and human sacrifice?

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New Blu-ray Releases Far From Home

This week’s physical media round-up brings home your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man. You’ll also have a pleasant time at a midsummer festival, and hang out with not one, but two creepy dolls. These are the new Blu-ray releases you should check out this week.

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midsommar director's cut

Labor Day traditionally marks the unofficial end of summer, but if you’d like to revisit writer/director Ari Aster‘s shot-in-broad-daylight horror film Midsommar, his director’s cut is still playing in a few select theaters. But if you don’t want to hoof it out to a theater to check it out, the extended director’s cut is coming to home video through an exclusive deal with Apple TV. Read More »

midsommar director's cut

If you’re in the mood for even more Midsommar, you’re in luck. The Midsommar director’s cut will be opening in select theaters nationwide this weekend. This cut features new and extended scenes and brings the total runtime to 171 minutes. So break out your flower crowns, stir up some special herbal tea, and get ready to dance your ass around the maypole all over again.

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Cool Posts From Around the Web:

flowers in midsommar

“Poppies bleed petals of sheer excess. You and I, this sweet battle ground.” – Janet Fitch, White Oleander 

Whether they’re in full bloom or slowly wilting, petals delicately falling to the floor like abandoned dreams, flowers can represent an array of emotions. It is customary to give flowers to loved ones during times of celebration and remorse. Their striking beauty and distinctive aromas provide a quick comfort, while some possess noxious traits that can elicit hallucinogenic, painful, or even fatal outcomes.

Ari Aster’s sophomore feature, Midsommar, utilizes flora to enhance the film’s visual and thematic use of juxtaposition. Light and dark. Foreign and familiar. Freedom and codependency. Safe and dangerous. The presence and use of flowers are reflective of both life and death while a young woman navigates through her grief in the sun-kissed fields of Sweden. Spoilers for Midsommar ahead. Read More »