in-rang the wolf brigade netflix

Netflix has picked up the next Kim Jee-Woon film for international release. The Korean auteur behind acclaimed works like A Tale of Two Sisters and The Good, the Bad, the Weird, will soon be thrilling South Korean audiences with his adaptation of the classic manga series Kerberos, but a global release was nowhere in sight — until now. Illang: The Wolf Brigade will soon be brought to international audiences on the streaming service.

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in-rang the wolf brigade trailer

Maybe Hollywood has a problem adapting beloved anime and manga properties, but it looks like South Korea won’t. The latest movie from acclaimed director Jee-Woon Kim (A Tale of Two Sisters, I Saw the Devil) is a remake of a classic manga series that has already seen three successful Japanese adaptations.

The title is probably best known as Jin-Roh: The Wolf Brigade, the classic 1999 anime film that still stands today as one of the seminal sci-fi films of the past few decades. Kim’s adaptation renames it In-rang: The Wolf Brigade, and transplants Mamoru Oshii‘s classic sci-fi story to a near-future reunified Korea. The first international trailer has been released, and though it doesn’t have subtitles, you don’t need to know Korean to know that the film is going to be great.

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27 People Who Could (or Should) Direct ‘The Batman’

the batman director

Yesterday, Ben Affleck stepped down from directing The Batman. One day, someone is going to write a book explaining exactly what was going on behind-the-scenes at Warner Bros. that led to this revolving door of filmmakers on all of their projects. We’ll surely know someday. But not today.

So today is a day of speculation. As Matt Reeves and Mat Ross emerge as apparent frontrunners, it’s time to do that thing where we make a list of people who should direct the next Batman movie. Some of these names are totally plausible. Some are wishful thinking. Others are here just because the thought of them directing a big-budget superhero movie makes me giggle uncontrollably. Most of all, this an excuse for us to just goof off and daydream while Warner Bros. figures everything out.

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the age of shadows review

Almost every Kim Jee-woon film is a blasted battlefield where style and substance have declared war on one another. Most of the time, the two reach a stalemate – films like The Good, The Bad, The Weird and I Saw the Devil are energetic masterpieces that often feel as if they’re teetering on the edge of collapse, films whose expansive running times are justified by the sheer amount of things happening on the screen. It may take awhile, but even The Last Stand (Kim’s first and, so far, last foray into Hollywood) taps into his innate desire to tear up everything on the screen with gleeful, gory debauchery. It’s his default mode and it has served him well.

The Age of Shadows is a quite the departure for the director, who has returned to South Korea and has returned with a slick historical spy epic that finds his most identifiable traits being moved to the back burner, for better and worse.

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the age of shadows trailer

A few years ago, South Korean filmmaker Kim Jee-woon‘s sojourn in Hollywood came to an abrupt end when The Last Stand was a box office bomb. And while I have a soft spot for that goofy, endearingly odd movie, a late-period Arnold Schwarzenegger shoot ’em up was probably not the best use of the man who directed A Tale of Two Sisters, A Bittersweet Life, I Saw the Devil, and The Good, The Bad, The Weird. Here’s a filmmaker who has always been at his best when he’s allowed to go totally for broke. He wasn’t made to juggle aging action stars and studio notes.

Now, Kim has returned to his homeland and has a new movie arriving this year. And I’m a little biased because I have loved almost all of his work so far, but The Age of Shadows looks like one of 2016’s more exciting movies, an espionage story that looks genuinely fresh and tense.

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kim jee-woon secret agent

The most recent feature from South Korean director Kim Jee-woon (above right) was The Last Stand, but now the director of I Saw the Devil and The Good, the Bad, and the Weird is moving forward on a new movie, with backing from Warner Bros. Secret Agent is Kim’s next feature, and also the first South Korean movie that Warner Bros. has backed.

The 1930s-set picture, which is set during Korea’s efforts to throw off Japanese colonialism, will be led by a couple of South Korean stars, and hopefully the WB backing means we’ll see it sooner rather than later in the US.  Read More »

I Saw the Devil

Spike Lee’s Oldboy wasn’t really a success in any sense when it opened last month. Critics met the film with a shrug, audiences failed to meet it at all, and fans who were against it to begin with got to crow “I told you so.”

But Oldboy‘s failure isn’t keeping producers Adi Shankar and Spencer Silna from trying to remake a different Korean revenge thriller starring Choi Min-sik. The pair have just picked up the English-language rights to I Saw the Devil, released in 2010 by Kim Jee-woon (The Good, the Bad, the Weird). Hit the jump for more details on the new project.

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ScreenX

Update: There is now a video showing ScreenX in Action, watch it embedded after the jump.

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Kim Jee-woon Directing Ed Brubaker’s ‘Coward’

coward-brubaker-1

The English-language debut of South Korean director Kim Ji-woon (I Saw the Devil; The Good, the Bad, the Weird) didn’t land with much impact. But the piffle of a reception given The Last Stand hasn’t frightened the director off making films outside his native country. And now Kim has latched on to a project that perhaps suits his own proclivities much better than did the Arnold Schwarzenegger action film.

Kim will next make Coward, based on the first storyline from the much-praised comic book series Criminal written by Ed Brubaker and drawn by Sean Phillips. Brubaker also adapted the script. Coward is a lean and very mean story of robbery big and small, of double-crosses, and best intentions that are blown all to hell. Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

snowpiercer-header-4

After much anticipation, neither Kim Ji-woon’s The Last Stand nor Park Chan-wook’s Stoker set Western audiences on fire when they opened earlier this year. But the third English-language debut by a South Korean director this year, Bong Joon-ho‘s Snowpiercer, seems poised to blow the other two out of the water.

Following very early screenings for the highly anticipated sci-fi film, the very first reviews have begun trickling out. And the critics seem to agree on a few points: 1) that Snowpiercer is very, very dark, 2) that it’s so dark it could turn off movie ticket buyers, and 3) that it’s freakin’ fantastic. Hit the jump to read their comments.

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