the golden glove review

Fatih Akin‘s The Golden Glove is the rawest, most real, and most brutal serial killer movie since Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer. Unflinchingly gruesome, and covered in a thick layer of grime, Akin’s film tells the true story of Fritz Honka, a murderer who stalked 1970s Hamburg, preying on the weak, the old, and the destitute. Honka was able to easily navigate amongst the downtrodden because he was one of them himself – a physically unappealing loner with a serious drinking problem. The Golden Glove has seemingly taken Honka’s inner and outer ugliness and projected it large on the screen. Buried under gruesome makeup, actor Jonas Dassler transforms into Honka, creating one of cinema’s most repulsive-yet-fascinating characters.

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night has come review

If Terrence Malick and Franz Kafka decided to get married, and then adopted an old wooden crate full of reels of stock footage as their baby, that offspring would look something like Night Has Come. Director Peter Van Goethem has cut together a plethora of Royal Belgian Film Archive stock footage to tell the story of a dystopian society plagued with a memory-erasing virus. Making use of overly poetic, often vague narration, Night Has Come unfolds like a memory of a fever dream, burning its way through your brain as you drift in and out of consciousness.

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saint maud fantastic fest

The slow, burning, ever-mounting dread. A scenario that always seems slightly off, as if the world itself has somehow become askew. And a climax that cranks the terror up to 11. These are the familiar trappings of the A24 horror movie – The WitchIt Comes At NightEnemy, HereditaryMidsommar, even the upcoming The Lighthouse. Now the indie distributor has added another slow-burn terror to their cannon: Saint MaudRose Glass‘ sensational creeper that puts the viewer entirely within the mind of its religion-obsessed protagonist. From the very first shot it becomes clear that horrible events are lurking in the shadows of Saint Maud, and by the time the shocking final frame arrives, we’re left with nothing but unrelenting nightmares.

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The Best Fantastic Fest Movies You’ve Never Seen

(Welcome to The Best Movies You’ve Never Seen, a series that takes a look at slightly more obscure, under-the-radar, or simply under-appreciated movies. This week we celebrate Fantastic Fest’s 15th anniversary with a look at some of the best films that played over the years that failed to find the audience they deserved.)

As mentioned above – literally just two lines up – this year’s Fantastic Fest Film Festival in Austin, TX is their 15th, and that’s something worth celebrating. It remains one of the best genre festivals in North America thanks to the venue, the fans, and most importantly, the wide variety of movies programmed each year. They play their fair share of bigger movies destined for wide release with the likes of Jojo Rabbit and Knives Out opening and closing this year’s fest, but the magic is in the far smaller titles.

The fest programs films from around the world and across genres, and while some eventually find their way to a proper US release – Rubber (2010) is about a sentient, homicidal tire and is available on Blu-ray! – just as many are rarely (if ever) seen on these shores again. As a big fan of genre films (horror, action, thrillers, dark comedy, etc) I’ve been introduced to numerous films and filmmakers over the years thanks to Fantastic Fest. Keep reading for a look at six of my favorites that never quite found the eyeballs and acclaim they deserve.

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fantastic fest 2019 second wave

The Fantastic Fest 2019 second wave is here – and it does not disappoint. If the first wave announcement didn’t do it for you (what’s your deal?), this second one should do the trick. Rian Johnson‘s star-studded Knives Out will close-out the fest, and new titles include Bong Joon-ho‘s Parasite and the Nicolas Cage-starring H.P. Lovecraft adaptation The Color Out of Space. Attendees will also be getting a sidebar dedicated to LGBTQ+ representation in genre cinema, a celebration of Mexican genre film, and more. 

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Jojo Rabbit - Fantastic Fest 2019

Summer is almost over, and while that means blockbuster season is winding down and awards season will soon heat up, it also means another Fantastic Fest is almost upon. This year marks the milestone 15th anniversary for the festival that brings us an array of genre films from across the world, ranging from comedy to horror to sci-fi and even more in-between. And Fantastic Fest 2019 will be kicking off with a movie that feels truly worth of the festival: Taika Waititi‘s Jojo Rabbit, featuring the director himself as a bullied boy scout’s imaginary friend Adolf Hitler.

In addition, Jim Mickle will bring the world premiere of his serial killer thriller In the Shadow of the Moon, director Vincenzo Natali returns with an adaptation of Stephen King & Joe Hill’s novella In the Tall Grass, and fillmmaker Brad Anderson lets Sam Worthington try to act again in the mysterious Fractured. But that’s not all Fantastic Fest 2019 has to offer. Read More »

the guilty clip

The Guilty finds tense, clever ways to make a one-location film exciting. The Danish thriller finds an emergency dispatcher trying to save a kidnapped woman after receiving a panicked call. In an exclusive The Guilty clip below, you can see the moment that launches the entire film into motion, as the dispatcher (Jakob Cedergren) receives the call.

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Crimson Peak trailer

Writer-director Guillermo del Toro‘s Crimson Peak made a surprising debut this weekend at a festival well-suited for the film. The romantic horror picture, from the director of Pan’s Labyrinth and Pacific Rim, probably wouldn’t have fit in at Toronto or the ongoing NYFF. But at Austin’s Fantastic Fest, del Toro’s latest was perfect for the genre-oriented film festival. To no one’s surprise, the first wave of Crimson Peak reviews are positive.

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The Alamo Drafthouse Picks the Top 10 Films of 2012

The Alamo Drafthouse brand is beloved among moviegoers for their plush theaters, but it’s revered for their impeccable taste in movies. Whether programming a film festival or picking up indies for distribution, they’ve demonstrated an eye for films that aren’t just good, but unique.

With 2012 on its way out, the company has just released its list of their ten favorite movies from the year. Some of the titles were as successful at the box office as they were with critics, while others are more off the beaten track, but all are well worth checking out. Read their picks after the jump.

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Alamo Drafthouse

For the past decade, film screenings at the Alamo Drafthouses in Austin, Texas have gained legendary status in geek culture. Stars show up to premiere films there, incredible posters are designed for many of the screenings, cult classics are paired around specific foods or themed events, not to mention it’s the birthplace of the Rolling Roadshow and the host venue for South by Southwest, Fantastic Fest, Harry Knowles’ Butt-Numb-A-Thon and was recently named “Best Overall Theatrical Experience” by Fandango. And now, that unique brand of incredible film going experience is on its way to both New York and Los Angeles.

Tim League, the founder and CEO of the Drafthouse, said that plans are in the works to bring Drafthouses to New York City and Los Angeles, the two hubs of the film world, “within the next year, year-and-a-half.” With the Drafthouse beginning to distribute movies, having theaters in those markets would be a major plus. Read More »