Bob Iger Masterclass

Disney CEO Bob Iger has his own style of leadership, one that’s defined by taking calculated risks that end up reaping significant financial reward as well as strengthening the brand of his corporation. Bob Iger also practices what he teaches when cultivating his own personal brand, particularly his credo on the importance of maximizing your presence across multiple channels to tell a cohesive, compelling story.

And Iger’s story is a compelling one; a tale that rests on how his leadership and business acumen made Disney into the IP-laden behemoth it is today. This story is directly told in his recently released memoir, and indirectly earlier this week with the rollout of Disney+. 

This week, Iger has launched another personal brand-building endeavor: MasterClass, a platform that provides online courses from well-known experts from a variety of fields (Penn & Teller, Spike Lee, Shonda Rhimes and Christina Aguilera are just a few other famous MasterClass teachers) will now have Bob Iger on their roster. Iger’s MasterClass is aimed to teach aspiring business owners and entrepreneurs how to be as badass of a leader as he’s been during his tenure as head of Disney. The class offers some sound business advice, but also spends time on the four major deals Iger oversaw at Disney: the acquisitions of Pixar, Marvel, Lucasfilm, and certain assets from 21st Century Fox. 

Iger’s retelling of how he closed these deals are the most interesting parts of his MasterClass, especially for those who care about any of the properties Disney now owns (which, let’s be honest, is pretty much everyone). Read on for details on a few IP-specific anecdotes shared in Iger’s MasterClass course.

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watchmen Martial Feats of Comanche Horsemanship

There are a lot of obvious differences between HBO’s Watchmen and its source material, the 1986 comic by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. There’s also a lot of coverage out there about these differences, and I agree with the coverage that says these differences work more often than not. 

But even though the TV show and the graphic novel are clearly different, there are crucial similarities as well. Both, for example, use the superhero trope as a metaphor to explore how power is often wielded in harmful ways, even if those in control think they’re doing the right thing. Both also tackle themes around identity (can someone in a mask really know what they stand for?) and the danger of creeping authoritarianism (who watches the Watchmen?). And both are, in my opinion at least, really really good. 

If these concepts intrigue you, and you haven’t read the graphic novel, you should definitely do so. And if you’ve already read Watchmen and are itching for more material in the same vein, give these other comic book series a try.

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Daybreak Netflix

Daybreak, Netflix’s foray into creating a snarky, post-apocalyptic high school dramedy, is ostensibly based on the eponymous graphic novel by Brian Ralph. The similarities between the show and the book, however, stop after the shared title, the post-apocalyptic setting, and certain characters breaking the fourth wall (for a couple episodes, at least).

The vast difference between the show and the graphic novel is not a bad thing, necessarily. But fans of the comic expecting a dark zombie story will find nothing of the sort in Netflix’s Daybreak, which focuses on a handful of kids trying to be witty while attempting to survive in a world where everyone over the age of 18 has turned into flesh-eating monsters (but not zombies…don’t call them zombies). 

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Avengers VR Experience

The recent trailer for Avengers: Damage Control has Ant-Man telling the audience to “Make good choices.” 

If you’re already going through the experience, however—an immersive 4-D VR adventure that involves strapping on goggles and a backpack before galivanting around a physical stage full of sensory effects—the joke’s on Ant-Man: you’ve already made good choices by deciding to spend the time and money (18-20 minutes and $39.95, respectively) to suit up and enter the Marvel Cinematic Universe. 

Avengers: Damage Control is the third time ILMxLAB has used The VOID’s VR platform to create experiences that leverage Disney’s ever-growing swath of IP. The first two—Star Wars: Secrets of the Empire and Ralph Breaks VR—are also immersive and wholly satisfying experiences in their own right (especially the Star Wars one); Damage Control, however, was a year-and-a-half effort that resulted in a longer, more expansive, and more technologically sophisticated adventure. 

Read on to learn more about the experience, including whether or not it’s part of MCU canon. 

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Carnival Row Review

The first eight episodes of the much-hyped Carnival Row finally dropped on Amazon Prime Video last week, giving people a new, dark fantastical world to get lost in (read /Film’s non-spoiler review here). Fans of fantasy, noir Victorian tales, and Orlando Bloom will particularly enjoy the show, which creates an expansive and immersive world while also narrowing in on a mysterious set of murders in The Burgue, the Victorian London-esque setting where most of the events of the first season take place.

There’s a lot going on in the first season (arguably too much, especially in the last few episodes), but those that stick through to the end will be rewarded by some twists and surprises, including who (and what) is behind the gory deaths that Rycroft Philostrate (Orlando Bloom) is investigating. But perhaps what’s more intriguing is what remains unresolved at the end of the last episode.

Read on to get our spoiler-filled breakdown of the big moments from the first season, and what we can expect to see further explored in season 2. Naturally, spoilers abound below. 

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Carnival Row Review

It would be easy to categorize Carnival Row—the eight-episode Amazon Original series set to premiere on August 30th—as Amazon’s attempt to create a Game of Thrones-esque hit for their streaming platform. This categorization isn’t wrong, exactly—Amazon has clearly invested a large amount of money to make this a flagship show for them—but placing Carnival Row into only this bucket does the series a disservice. 

Yes, the new series is like Game of Thrones in that it takes place in a darkly fantastical world full of geopolitical strife and unnatural evils; and yes, like a certain HBO show, Carnival Row, with its graphic deaths (and innumerable close-up shots of entrails), nudity and foul language, is definitely not suitable for children. These similarities, however, are superficial at best. Viewers will get a different experience here—a more intimate one that reveals Carnival Row’s magically effed-up world through a cadre of unique individuals with varying levels of social status.

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Star Trek Picard trailer

Reactions to the release of the much-anticipated Star Trek: Picard trailer at last weekend’s San Diego Comic-Con have been overwhelmingly positive, giving fans an injection of nostalgia, while also dropping some tantalizing clues as to what’s in store for the new series. Read on for a detailed breakdown of the trailer, including speculation on what it could mean for the 2020 show.

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Supernatural Comic-Con 2019

“Can we all just start crying so I don’t feel so weird?” Jared Padelecki said at the beginning of this year’s Supernatural panel at San Diego Comic-Con. It was an emotional time not only for him and the others on stage, but also for the fans in the Hall H audience. After a staggering 15 seasons and numerous Comic-Con appearances, Supernatural is coming to an end. 

Padelecki, who plays Sam Winchester on the show, was joined by fellow actors Jensen Ackles (Dean Winchester), Misha Collins (Castiel), and Alexander Calvert (Jack), along with executive producers Robert Singer, Andrew Dabb, Eugenie Ross-Leming, Brad Buckner, and Bob Berens on stage. Richard Speight Jr. and Rob Benedict, who play Gabriel and God/Chuck, respectively, were there as well, taking on the role of co-moderators again. And while everyone still cracked jokes with one another, there was a bittersweet mood in the air. Read More »

Women Who Kick Ass panel SDCC2019

The “Women Who Kick Ass” panel is a San Diego Comic-Con staple. Entertainment Weekly has hosted the event in Hall H for several years in a row, and this year brought together five accomplished actresses to share their stories of working in Hollywood and what they’ve learned from their years in the business. 

Moderator Sarah Rodman introduced Shoreh Aghdasloo (The Expanse), Freema Agyeman (New Amsterdam, Doctor Who), Betty Gilpin (The Hunt, GLOW), Jeri Ryan (Star Trek), and Cobie Smulders (The AvengersStumptown) to the stage, where the conversation ranged from their role models to deciding what characters they want to play. Read on to hear more about their discussion. Read More »

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Jay and Silent Bob Reboot - Kevin Smith Jason Mewes

It wouldn’t be Comic-Con without a panel from filmmaker, television director, comic writer, and pop culture influencer Kevin Smith. However, this year didn’t just have the Clerks, Mallrats, Chasing Amy and Dogma director gabbing away and telling showbiz stories.

At Comic-Con, the Kevin Smith Reboots Hall H panel debuted some clips for the filmmaker’s forthcoming comedy Jay and Silent Bob Reboot, a sequel/reboot of Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back. Plus, he also debuted a scene from the film showcasing the movie within the movie: Bluntman v Chronic, clearly taking a cue from Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Find out what we learned from the Jay and Silent Bob Reboot Comic-Con panel presentation below. Read More »