Carnival Row Review

The first eight episodes of the much-hyped Carnival Row finally dropped on Amazon Prime Video last week, giving people a new, dark fantastical world to get lost in (read /Film’s non-spoiler review here). Fans of fantasy, noir Victorian tales, and Orlando Bloom will particularly enjoy the show, which creates an expansive and immersive world while also narrowing in on a mysterious set of murders in The Burgue, the Victorian London-esque setting where most of the events of the first season take place.

There’s a lot going on in the first season (arguably too much, especially in the last few episodes), but those that stick through to the end will be rewarded by some twists and surprises, including who (and what) is behind the gory deaths that Rycroft Philostrate (Orlando Bloom) is investigating. But perhaps what’s more intriguing is what remains unresolved at the end of the last episode.

Read on to get our spoiler-filled breakdown of the big moments from the first season, and what we can expect to see further explored in season 2. Naturally, spoilers abound below. 

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Carnival Row Review

It would be easy to categorize Carnival Row—the eight-episode Amazon Original series set to premiere on August 30th—as Amazon’s attempt to create a Game of Thrones-esque hit for their streaming platform. This categorization isn’t wrong, exactly—Amazon has clearly invested a large amount of money to make this a flagship show for them—but placing Carnival Row into only this bucket does the series a disservice. 

Yes, the new series is like Game of Thrones in that it takes place in a darkly fantastical world full of geopolitical strife and unnatural evils; and yes, like a certain HBO show, Carnival Row, with its graphic deaths (and innumerable close-up shots of entrails), nudity and foul language, is definitely not suitable for children. These similarities, however, are superficial at best. Viewers will get a different experience here—a more intimate one that reveals Carnival Row’s magically effed-up world through a cadre of unique individuals with varying levels of social status.

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Star Trek Picard trailer

Reactions to the release of the much-anticipated Star Trek: Picard trailer at last weekend’s San Diego Comic-Con have been overwhelmingly positive, giving fans an injection of nostalgia, while also dropping some tantalizing clues as to what’s in store for the new series. Read on for a detailed breakdown of the trailer, including speculation on what it could mean for the 2020 show.

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Supernatural Comic-Con 2019

“Can we all just start crying so I don’t feel so weird?” Jared Padelecki said at the beginning of this year’s Supernatural panel at San Diego Comic-Con. It was an emotional time not only for him and the others on stage, but also for the fans in the Hall H audience. After a staggering 15 seasons and numerous Comic-Con appearances, Supernatural is coming to an end. 

Padelecki, who plays Sam Winchester on the show, was joined by fellow actors Jensen Ackles (Dean Winchester), Misha Collins (Castiel), and Alexander Calvert (Jack), along with executive producers Robert Singer, Andrew Dabb, Eugenie Ross-Leming, Brad Buckner, and Bob Berens on stage. Richard Speight Jr. and Rob Benedict, who play Gabriel and God/Chuck, respectively, were there as well, taking on the role of co-moderators again. And while everyone still cracked jokes with one another, there was a bittersweet mood in the air. Read More »

Women Who Kick Ass panel SDCC2019

The “Women Who Kick Ass” panel is a San Diego Comic-Con staple. Entertainment Weekly has hosted the event in Hall H for several years in a row, and this year brought together five accomplished actresses to share their stories of working in Hollywood and what they’ve learned from their years in the business. 

Moderator Sarah Rodman introduced Shoreh Aghdasloo (The Expanse), Freema Agyeman (New Amsterdam, Doctor Who), Betty Gilpin (The Hunt, GLOW), Jeri Ryan (Star Trek), and Cobie Smulders (The AvengersStumptown) to the stage, where the conversation ranged from their role models to deciding what characters they want to play. Read on to hear more about their discussion. Read More »

Jay and Silent Bob Reboot - Kevin Smith Jason Mewes

It wouldn’t be Comic-Con without a panel from filmmaker, television director, comic writer, and pop culture influencer Kevin Smith. However, this year didn’t just have the Clerks, Mallrats, Chasing Amy and Dogma director gabbing away and telling showbiz stories.

At Comic-Con, the Kevin Smith Reboots Hall H panel debuted some clips for the filmmaker’s forthcoming comedy Jay and Silent Bob Reboot, a sequel/reboot of Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back. Plus, he also debuted a scene from the film showcasing the movie within the movie: Bluntman v Chronic, clearly taking a cue from Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Find out what we learned from the Jay and Silent Bob Reboot Comic-Con panel presentation below. Read More »

Marvel at Comic-Con retrospective

The Marvel Cinematic Universe was back in San Diego Comic-Con’s Hall H this year, where president Kevin Feige announced a combination of ten films and Disney+ shows coming out between now and November 2021. There’s a lot to be excited about even beyond the properties that received full presentations (Blade?! Fantastic Four?! Mutants?!), but before we move forward into the next phase of the MCU, it’s worth spending a bit of time reminiscing on the 13-year history that the MCU has already had with San Diego Comic-Con. 

Read on for some of the most memorable SDCC moments from the Infinity Saga of the MCU. Read More »

star trek picard poster

It’s a very interesting time to be a Star Trek fan. In addition to Star Trek: Discovery exploring brave new worlds on CBS All Access, several other series are in the works. For longtime fans, the upcoming Star Trek: Picard will offer a check-in with Patrick Stewart’s beloved Starfleet commander decades after the events of Star Trek: Nemesis. For newer fans, perhaps the comedic animated series Star Trek: Lower Decks will offer a bit of variety to an old but still powerful franchise.

All three shows were part of CBS All Access’s 90-minute Enter the Star Trek Universe panel at San Diego Comic-Con, where they pulled out all the stops and offered several looks at the future of the universe’s greatest science fiction franchise. Here’s what we learned.

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Carnival Row Comic-Con

Carnival Row has had a long history, languishing in development purgatory before finding a home as an eight-episode fantasy-noir series premiering on Amazon Prime Video next month.

“I wrote this script in film school 17 years ago,” show creator and executive producer Travis Beacham explained at San Diego Comic-Con’s Carnival Row panel on Friday. “I did it as a feature film and I did it without a mind to ever sell it; it was just a sandbox where I could play. Ironically, it was the script that first sold, and it was the script that started my career…as beloved as it was, it languished for awhile until about four or five years ago when Legendary picked it up and suggested doing it as a TV series. The prospect of that was extremely exciting — in writing the world I had imagined so much backstory, and so much stuff around the corners and around the streets. If I had been writing it for the first time now, I would never had even written it as a film.”

Read on for everything we learned at the Carnival Row Comic-Con panel. Read More »

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the boys comic-con

“If you’re here with your kids, you’re a terrible person…it’s a fucking grown-up show. If you’re easily offended—please pounce.”

That’s how moderator Aisha Tyler opened San Diego Comic-Con’s The Boys panel, an Amazon Original series based on the comic books of Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson in which superheroes live among us and are major assholes. As Tyler made clear, the show is not for kids, and not only because the shared clips were dotted with bleeped expletives. 

Executive producer Eric Kripke explained the premise of this dark-and-funny show. “We started with just wanting to take a piss out of the superhero genre a little bit,” he said. “I think the deeper we explored the first pilot and then the season, the more we realized it was the perfect show to describe the moment that we’re living in…the show is really about what happens when you use celebrity to manipulate people, to use your power to make the common guy act against his own best interest…The Boys is a funny superhero show, but it’s also an incredibly accurate depiction of the world we live in.” Read More »