Jason Sudeikis interview

Jason Sudeikis has a real talent for making characters more likable than they probably are on paper. In the case of his new movie, Driven, he plays John DeLorean’s buddy, Jim Hoffman, a guy with a knack for bullshitting. He frequently lies, and yet there’s something oddly charming about the F.B.I. informant – maybe his honesty about being a bit of a phony. That’s not a level of self-awareness DeLorean, who’s basically Jim Hoffman if he achieved great success, shows in the movie.

The two friends are two sides of the same coin in director Nick Hamm‘s critically well-received drama, which shares no relation to the 2001 Renny Harlin movie co-starring Burt Reynolds. Based on a true story involving cocaine, DeLorean’s iconic car, and the F.B.I., it’s a wild true story about friendship and facade. It’s also a bit of a buddy movie with Sudeikis and Lee Pace playing close but distant friends, both comical in their own ways.

Recently, we had the chance to briefly talk to Sudeikis about playing Hoffman and figures from history, lessons learned from SNL and Second City, and his take on the long-gestating Fletch reboot.

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fletch update

Another Fletch movie has been in the works for around 20 years now. Based on Gregory McDonald‘s novels, the investigative journalist first hit the big screen back in 1985 with Chevy Chase giving one of his most sincere and career-defining performances. Since 2011, a reboot and origin story, titled Fletch Won, has been kicking around in development.  Warner Bros. envisioned a comedy franchise when SNL alum Jason Sudeikis signed up to star, but a year later, the reboot landed at Relativity and seemingly never picked up momentum. Since then, Relativity went bankrupt and we’ve heard very little about the project. There are no new major developments to share, but Sudeikis did recently tell us the reboot is still possible and what he has in mind for the role.

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scary stories to tell in the dark trailer

Studio horror movies made for teenagers rarely get much better than Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. Based on the books written by Alvin Schwartz and illustrated by Stephen Gammell, the horror movie has a more classical than modern approach to its scares. André Øvredal‘s movie relies almost entirely on tension, not jump scares, although it delivers on those, too.

Executive produced by Guillermo del Toro, Øvredal’s movie has a similar handmade quality to its mostly practical monsters: The Pale Lady, the Jangly Man, the Toe Monster, and Harold the Scarecrow. The four of them are as nightmare-inducing as the unshakeable illustrations of the original books. As Hoai-Tran Bui wrote in her review, “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark effectively captures the primal horror of campfire stories while doing justice by Schwartz’s creepy designs in a marriage of old-fashioned practical thrills and sleek modern effects.”

Øvredal took some time to tell us about those thrills and modern effects during a recent phone interview, but if you’ve yet to see the movie, you may want to wait to read what he had to say about movie’s scariest scenes. Some minor spoilers lie ahead.

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hobbs and shaw review

The days of boosting cars and racing for pinks is long gone in the Fast & Furious world. The earliest installments in the series continue to look comically quaint in comparison to the likes of Hobbs & Shaw, although the mega movie does tip its hat to the old days of the franchise once or twice. In addition to all the globe-trotting and saving the world business expected from Fast brand, Hobbs & Shaw now brings a touch of sci-fi to the franchise. And director David Leitch seems to be having a blast with it.

The spinoff still has the tone, sensibility, and taste for the ridiculousness of a Fast & Furious movie, but more than anything else, it plays like a comic book movie. The co-founder of 87Eleven and filmmaker behind Atomic Blonde and Deadpool 2 could’ve put superhero costumes on Dwayne Johnson and Jason Statham in this movie, and they wouldn’t have looked out of place. Leitch, as he told us, had comic book movies on his mind when making his XXX-L summer movie.

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Atomic Blonde is a cool slice of art-house action. The movie could forever stand alone as one very stylish piece of entertainment, but who in their right mind wouldn’t want to see Lorraine Broughton kick more ass? She’s such a thrilling anti-hero to watch, both when she is and isn’t cracking skulls. Charlize Theron is dynamite as the hard-hitting spy, but it’s still not guaranteed she’ll play Broughton again.

The good news: according to the Atomic Blonde and Hobbs & Shaw director, David Leitch, there is still talk of a sequel, which has caught the attention of a streaming service.

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David Crosby: Remember My Name evenhandedly shows the highs and lows of a life in rock ‘n’ roll. The good times don’t outweigh the bad in director A.J. Eaton‘s documentary on the iconic member of Crosby, Stills, Nash, & Young. The documentary shows an artist struggling with the past and the future but still consumed by music.

No subject comes across as off-the-table for David Crosby. When he’s not throwing hilarious jabs at Jim Morrison, the artist reveals himself, flaws and all, without asking for empathy or making excuses. From the opening of the movie, he goes deep with its interviewer and producer, Cameron Crowe. The feel-good filmmaker famous for Almost Famous and Jerry Maguire has been interviewing Crosby ever since his Rolling Stone Magazine days. All these years later, the journalist again got to share another candid conversation with the musician.

Recently, Cameron told us about his earliest interviews with Crosby, how musicians influenced his dialogue, and knowing when an interview subject isn’t being honest.

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As a Lynn Shelton movie, Sword of Trust is both familiar and an oddity. The dramedy has a focused yet free-wheeling narrative similar to Shelton’s other heavily-improvised movies, including Your Sister’s Sister and Laggies, but it’s the first movie of hers that could arguably be considered a partial thriller. There are more guns and swords in Sword of Trust than the usual Lynn Shelton film.

Caught directly in the middle of the drama over a Civil War-era sword is a pawnshop owner by the name of Mel, who’s played by renowned comedian and podcaster Marc Maron. Shelton first directed Maron in his IFC comedy series, which they followed up with his Netflix special, Too Real, and now Sword of Trust. The two similarly intimate storytellers have proven to be a compatible combo over the last few years. Recently, Maron told us about being directed by Shelton, how they made his comedy special truly intimate, continuing to grow as an actor, and of course, Van Halen frontman Diamond David Lee Roth.

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yesterday lyric video

Never expect a downer of a movie from writer-director Richard Curtis. Love ActuallyNotting HillFour Weddings and a Funeral – his scripts are almost always packed with pure joy. Curtis made a long impressive list of crowd-pleasers, plus a holiday classic that never fails to brighten up the holidays. His scripts are generally packed with pure joy, so his sensibility makes for a fine fit for a movie largely about The Beatles.

Danny Boyle‘s Yesterday is based on an idea by Jack Birth (The Simpsons) and Curtis, who brings his nice and light rom-com touch to a high-concept. As Curtis told us, the movie has much in common with his last film, About Time, his final movie as a director. When we spoke with the writer about writing Boyle’s latest, he told us about his favorite feel-good movies, writing about The Beatles, and not missing directing.

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child's play behind-the-scenes video

“E.T. on acid” is how director Lars Klevberg initially imagined his Child’s Play remake. Klevberg, known for his short film Polaroid and its unreleased feature-length adaptation, wanted to bring a healthy dose of Spielberg and Amblin to his horror remake. The influence shows, most noticeably when Andy (Gabriel Bateman) and Chucky (voiced by Mark Hamill) are on their own.

Klevberg is probably more referential of Spielberg than the entirety of the original Chucky franchise. He didn’t want to make another horror remake that coasts by on nostalgia, which there’s not much of in Child’s Play. As Klevberg told us, he wanted to make his own Chucky. In addition to the challenges of filming the iconic character in action, the director told us about the movie’s Amblin references, his love of Sam Mendes’ Road to Perdition, and more.

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Jim Gaffigan interview

Comedian Jim Gaffigan is so likable on stage that it’s always a joy seeing him get mean in a movie. In Miranda Bailey‘s Being Frank, Gaffigan does away with his charms and stars as a man who’s almost always wrong. Gaffigan never tries to sugarcoat or lighten up Frank, a two-faced liar fighting to keep his two families from realizing each other’s existence. Frank is, as Gaffigan says, a prick, but the actor still miraculously pulls off a few moments of empathy.

It’s another performance that shows more range from Gaffigan, who’s very funny as a very unfunny character. Being Frank is only one of the many projects we’ll see from the actor-comedian this year, including his upcoming Amazon special and a variety of movies. Three of those movies premiered at the Sundance Film Festival this year, which is the first of many subjects we covered with Gaffigan. If you want to read the comedian get nerdy about stand up comedy, look no further.

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