15 Movies We’re Dying to See at Fantastic Fest 2018

Fantastic Fest, the largest genre film festival in the United States, kicks off tomorrow and /Film will be in attendance. Soon, we’ll be neck-deep in horror, fantasy, action, and general all-around weirdness and we’ll be sharing with you what you must see and what you must seek out. Few film festivals encourage curiosity and being adventurous quite like this one.

But before things kick off, our team came together to talk about the movies we want to see above all others. Sure, we’re going to discover new favorites and hidden gems during the fest, but these are the movies we’re prioritizing.

Read More »

Tenacious D Animated Series

Fantastic Fest is chock full of wild and crazy genre movies, but it’s also host to a showcase of short films and other assorted oddities, and one of them should certainly have Tenacious D fans excited.

Today, the third wave of programming for Fantastic Fest was announced, and one of the surprise additions to the line-up is a six-part animated series called Tenacious D in Post-Apocalypto. That’s right, Jack Black and Kyle Gass are getting animated again as the dynamic duo responsible for defeating the devil with rock and writing a tribute to the greatest song in the world.

Find out more about the Tenacious D animated series below. Read More »

michael giacchino short film

Michael Giacchino has made a name for himself as one of Hollywood’s hardest working film composers, and maybe he can add hardest-working director to his resume. The Oscar-winning composer of Up will finally make his directorial debut with a short film that will be playing at this month’s Fantastic Fest in Austin.

Read More »

Halloween reboot image

In retrospect, it was inevitable: David Gordon Green‘s Halloween will be the opening night film at this year’s Fantastic Fest. The Austin-based genre film festival has long been a home for horror films of all kinds, and it’s hard to imagine a fest where the highly anticipated sequel will receive a warmer welcome.

Of course, it helps that star Jamie Lee Curtis will be in attendance.

Read More »

In the decade or so that I’ve been attending Fantastic Fest, I’ve watched this Austin-based genre film festival grow from a scrappy operation dedicated to showcasing weirdness from around the world to a major destination for Hollywood premieres. And this year’s edition finds two heavy-hitters making their debut: director Julius Avery‘s Bad Robot-produced World War II horror movie Overlord, and Apostle, the latest film from The Raid and The Raid 2 director Gareth Evans.

Of course, those big premieres exist alongside dozens of smaller and stranger and wilder movies from around the globe and you can see the first wave of film announcements below. Many more titles will be announced, but this is already looking like a killer year.

Read More »

bodied review

Bodied is not the movie I thought it was going to be when I walked into the Fantastic Fest screening. Joseph Kahn‘s previous feature, Detention, is one of those so-crazy-I-can’t-believe-it-exists kind of movies and I think that’s what was in my brain when I sat down to watch his new one.

The premise of Bodied is simple: a young fan is mentored by his idol and his nurtured talent shines. You’ve seen this story before, especially in movies about sports or martial arts, but never quite in this way. Battle Rap is the forum here, not a stadium or a dojo.

Read More »

Brawl in Cell Block 99 Review

S. Craig Zahler‘s Brawl in Cell Block 99 may be one of the most violent movies ever made. It’s easy to imagine scenes from its gore-soaked final act becoming YouTube shock fodder in the years ahead, moments that people spring on unsuspecting friends to get a reaction. That may sound like catnip for seasoned genre film fans, audiences who are numb to cinematic violence and feel like they’ve seen everything, but even those with the most hardened nerves may find themselves lightheaded. It’s that gross. It’s that unsparing. It’s that effective.

But it also comes at the end of a bad movie. Albeit, a bad movie that curious viewers should definitely check out for themselves because Brawl in Cell Block 99 is too weird to ignore, too audacious to write off, and too damn interesting to stop thinking about. But yes, it is bad.

Read More »

wheelman review

Allow me to thumb my suspenders and clear the kids off my lawn before I break out this old cliche, but they don’t make ’em like this much anymore.

Wheelman may represent the shifting cinematic landscape of 2017 – it was produced by Netflix and will skip theaters and arrive directly on the streaming service next month – but it’s a straightforward, simple, muscular, and blissfully old school thriller that, much like its leading man, feels like it escaped from 1974. But even when this crime-gone-wrong movie traffics in familiar beats, it does so with a slick confidence and calm-under-fire grace. Making a movie that feels this cool (this effortlessly cool) sometimes feels like a lost art. This is the kind of hardened, macho, dizzyingly entertaining crime movie that gets in, does its job, and gets out without wasting a single second of your precious time. You get the sense that Wheelman respects you, the audience member: it’s not here to beat around the bush. Like a great getaway driver, its focus is squarely on delivering the goods.

Read More »

Thelma Review

Joachim Trier‘s Thelma begins with one of the most haunting opening scenes in recent memory. A young girl and her father trek out into the wilderness surrounding their home, crossing over a frozen lake and entering the woods. The father is armed with a rifle. When his young daughter isn’t looking, he takes aim at the back of her head. He hesitates. He doesn’t pull the trigger.

And then we leap forward a number of years and Thelma (Eili Harboe) is heading to university in Oslo and learns that something is wrong with her. Or right with her. Because Thelma has supernatural abilities. And like any kid heading off to college for the first time, she’s got some serious stuff to figure out.

Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

anna and the apocalypse review

As a Scottish zombie Christmas musical comedy, Anna and the Apocalypse sounds like a joke. And for a little while, it feels like one.

Conceived as a High School Musical riff where the shambling undead arrive to wreak havoc on a more trivial teen movie, director John McPhail‘s film leans hard into comedy and irony in its first act. But like the 21st century’s greatest horror comedy (Edgar Wright’s Shaun of the Dead), the film finds its voice and its soul when it drops the wink and becomes a fully realized musical horror movie with actual stakes…and the nerve to literally tear its lovable cast to pieces.

Read More »