suspiria ending

Luca Guadagnino‘s Suspiria is now playing, thrilling some audiences while leaving others very confused at what the hell they just watched. Guadagnino’s remake strays drastically from Dario Argento’s original, concluding in a shocking, surprising way. Dakota Johnson, who stars in the film as Susie, recently offered up a Suspiria ending explanation, should that be something you’re looking for.

As you might expect, major spoilers follow – so turn back now if you haven’t seen Suspiria.

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/Filmcast Ep. 492 – Suspiria

Suspiria Poster

David, Devindra, Lindsey, and Britt talk about Netflix’s Chilling Adventures of Sabrina and The Haunting of Hill House. David gets more “screenlife” with Unfriended: Dark Web. The cast (sans David) stay on to discuss Luca Guadagnino’s Suspiria, a rebirth of Dario Argento’s 1977 Italian horror. Stay tuned for the after dark on AMC Stubs A-List’s recent price hike.

Read Britt Hayes’s writing on the theme of inherited trauma in this year’s horror films, as well as her psychoanalysis of Guadagnino and his connection with the original cult classic.

Be sure to check out David’s new podcast, Write Along.

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Also, follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook.

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suspiria prequel

Suspiria just recently opened wide, and director Luca Guadagnino already has a prequel idea in mind. Rather than move forward with the story, Guadagnino wants to go back in time. Way back in time, all the way to the 1200s. There, the story would focus on Helena Markos, one of the three characters in the new film played by Tilda Swinton.

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Suspiria Poster

I’m still trying to figure out Luca Guadagnino’s Suspiria. It’s been more than a month since I saw the movie at Fantastic Fest, and I’ve caught it once more in the meantime. In the immediate aftermath of that first viewing, I was lucky enough to speak with two of the creative minds at the helm of this rebirth of Dario Argento’s classic horror film: screenwriter David Kajganich and actress Jessica Harper, who originated the role of Suzy Bannion in the 1977 original and plays a mysterious role in the remake.

The two were gracious with their time and answers, and I was especially pleased to know that some of my initial misgivings about the film were addressed and eased by Kajganich. I don’t know that I’ll ever wrap my head around this massive movie — which I can’t stop writing or talking about — but I do know that I appreciate the insight Kajganich and Harper gifted me, and I hope our conversation can help fellow readers who might be parsing out their own complicated thoughts.

Below, we discuss the film’s gender politics, the influence of German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder (including a fun personal story from Harper about meeting him), and all that noise about a possible sequel.

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year of the witch

The popularity of witches in our culture waxes and wanes, but 2018 has been a year of occult obsession around fierce females. Witches of all kinds have been forced from the shadows as misogynists and bigots are emboldened by American’s game show president. Celebrity witches like Lana Del Rey and Azealia Banks have been especially vocal lately, fictional witches are showing up on the big and small screen, and women are embracing witchcraft as a form of rebellion against the patriarchy.

According to Patricia MacCormack, an author, academic, and practitioner of chaos magic, witchcraft can be an outlet for the oppressed to find strength.

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Suspiria Reviews

The halls of the Markos Dance Academy are barren; blanched of color and body, wide deco door frames and high ceilings gape like hungry mouths. The sizes seems preposterous for how few people dwell there: a handful of young women in the company and their teachers. But though the women are small in number, there exists in their building an unflinching, insurmountable terror. A thicket of wicked in its bowels. Numbers don’t matter when evil is thirsting in the shadows.

Luca Guadagnino’s palatial Suspiriaa remake of Dario Argento’s 1977 original — is in a league of its own, arguably the most interesting horror remake of all time, and definitely the best. Assembled into six chapters and an epilogue, it’s a nearly 3-hour behemoth, which will annoy some and liberate others, while forging a cinematic identity unto itself. You’ve never seen anything quite like this. You might be grateful for that.

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horror newbie watches suspiria

(Welcome to The Final Girl, a regular feature from someone who has steered clear of horror and is ready to finally embrace the genre that goes bump in the night. Next and last on the list: Looking back at my horror journey through the 1977 and 2018 Suspiria.)

Well, here we are, old friend. You and me on the last page. I began this column about a year ago as a self-proclaimed horror newbie, not knowing what to expect of a genre that I had avoided for years. And now I emerge, bloody and screaming, with the realization that maybe I was a horror fan all along.

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At some point in early October, I stopped by Facebook and the top post in my feed was from ScreenCrush’s Matt Singer, wherein he asked what the reader’s biggest cinematic blind spot was. My initial answer has been my go-to for a long time: Gone with the Wind. (I own a copy of the Blu-ray, and I still haven’t seen it. I have no excuses.) But as I thought more, remembering what time of year it was, I realized that I had two other answers: Halloween and Suspiria.

A local colleague of mine had the same reaction as my wife regarding John Carpenter’s seminal 1978 horror film: “How have you never seen Halloween?” (No one in my immediate circle gave me guff for Suspiria.) The film that introduced everyone to Michael Myers is one I thought I knew very well, primarily through cultural osmosis. Having seen Wes Craven’s Scream, I understood the basics of the story, and I’d even seen a couple of brief clips from the film. (As I soon learned, those clips are from literally the last 5 minutes.) And having read the work of critics like Roger Ebert, I knew enough about Carpenter’s many nods to a prototype of the slasher genre, Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho.

I didn’t actively avoid watching either of these films. I’m not a huge horror fan, in part because I don’t enjoy the buckets-of-blood mentality evinced in many pinnacles of the genre. I can admire some horror films, but rarely consider them among my favorites. But something about the concept of slasher films is too gruesome to me to really enjoy. Even the 1960 one-two punch of Psycho and Michael Powell’s unnerving British thriller Peeping Tom are films I admire and appreciate, without being films I want to revisit.

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In high school, I first heard the myth of the invisible ships. Perhaps you know it. It goes as such: When European explorers first discovered the Americas, their boats were so inconceivably large and foreign that the natives couldn’t comprehend them, and therefore couldn’t see them. The theory is based mostly on observations from the voyagers, who noted that natives failed to acknowledge the massive ships, and that even as they approached the shore they didn’t look up from what they were doing to take in the sight.

The theory is probably bogus, but has stuck with me since I first heard it, and popped back into my head when I saw Luca Guadagnino’s Suspiria remake at Fantastic Fest last month. A voyager’s massive ship and an experimental horror film are, circumstantially, pretty different; but the idea of being so utterly overwhelmed at the sight of something that you could barely comprehend it feels comparable. Suspiria isn’t a thing you look at once and understand. It’s a radical, carnal, enormous piece of work that took a lot of mediating, fire-stoking, and reflection to get to where I’m at now with the film. I imagine many viewers will have a similarly complicated experience.

That’s why I wanted to write out the stages of Suspiria acceptance that I went through after seeing the film, talking to its screenwriter David Kajganich, and witnessing the critical reactions pour in. I hope I can help others mount the beast that is Guadagnino’s insane masterwork. Let’s work the steps together.

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Cool Posts From Around the Web:

suspiria clip

Suspiria is now playing in select cities, and folks, it’s bonkers. Luca Guadagnino‘s remake of Dario Argento’s horror classic is a big, bold, incredibly strange experience that you’ll either love or hate (no middle ground here). A new Suspiria clip has just arrived, offering a tiny glimpse of the madness inherent in the movie. Watch as one of the film’s dancers has a complete breakdown and hurls accusations of witchcraft! Watch the Suspiria clip below.

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