The Irishman Violence

You may find it hard to believe, but Martin Scorsese has been in the news recently. On a cynical level, it’s arguably a bit convenient that Scorsese’s fully thought-out and reasonably critical opinions of both the Marvel Cinematic Universe and blockbuster cinema as a whole have become such a flashpoint of critical discourse over the last few weeks. His latest feature, The Irishman, has arrived in a handful of theaters around the country before landing in its streaming home, Netflix, on November 27. The new film wades in some familiar waters, specifically the Mafia, and features some of the director’s longtime acting collaborators. Yet most importantly, The Irishman is a firm, conclusive counterargument to one of the criticisms that has always hounded Scorsese: that he endorses the violence he depicts.

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Mark Ruffalo Shutter Island

The fight between diehard Marvel Studios fans and Martin Scorsese stans is starting to feel like if the climactic battle in Avengers: Endgame had lasted for months instead of minutes. At this point, both sides are tired and just waiting for something to end this once and for all, finally putting everyone out of their misery. Thankfully, Mark Ruffalo has a potential solution.
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kevin feige responds to scorsese

Kevin Feige has broken his silence on Martin Scorsese‘s superhero movie comments. A week after The Irishman director published a New York Times essay that in a better world would have put a stop to the discourse, Feige is responding to Scorsese’s arguments that Marvel movies aren’t “cinema.”

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Martin Scorsese Cameos

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, a video essay tries to explain why what Martin Scorsese said about Marvel movies is right, and that probably won’t ruffle any feathers at all. Plus, Eddie Murphy and some of the cast of Dolemite is My Name talk about making the movie, blaxploitation, and more, and Tig Notaro tries to figure out who Game of Thrones star Lena Headey is in a new Under a Rock. Read More »

martin scorsese marvel movies

It’s been 84 years since Martin Scorsese lit the internet on fire with his less-than-glowing words about Marvel movies. After weeks of superhero fans whipping themselves into a frenzy over what “cinema” entails, and outlets cycling through every auteur they can find to comment on the outrage, the legendary filmmaker is stepping back into the conversation. Scorsese published an essay in The New York Times explaining exactly what he means when he declares that Marvel movies aren’t cinema, and why the dominance of superhero movies could threaten the very face of the industry.

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martin scorsese joker

When word of a stand-alone Joker movie first broke, rumor had it that Martin Scorsese was going to be producing. That ultimately didn’t happen, but as it turns out, Scorsese did consider working on the project – but ultimately passed. In the filmmaker’s own words, he “did not have time for it”, and also ultimately decided the material just wasn’t his cup of tea.

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Martin Scorsese probably didn’t realize he was going to stir up an entire ongoing debate about the state of cinema and the value of superhero movies when he criticized the popular genre of films while out on the publicity tour for The Irishman. But here we are, over three weeks later, and Scorsese is still talking about his comments that put the internet into a tizzy. However, this time Scorsese seems to be making an attempt to put out the fire that he inadvertently started.

In a recent interview, Martin Scorsese explained his classification of Marvel movies as being akin to “theme parks,” but he also called them “a new art form,” and he further clarified his concerns when it comes to sharing the theatrical experience with other movies. Read More »

bringing out the dead scorsese

Can a Martin Scorsese movie be considered truly underrated? Scorsese has produced one well-regarded film after another for the majority of his career, and his bonafides remain untouchable. But nestled within Scorsese’s impressive filmography might be one truly underrated gem: his 1999 effort Bringing Out the Dead. It’s a wild, energetic, but ultimately compassionate work. It was also a major box office flop that barely made a blip and still hasn’t been released on Blu-ray. Twenty years later, Bringing Out the Dead is overdue for a reappraisal.

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Francis Ford Coppola Criticizes Marvel Movies

Martin Scorsese threw fans of the Marvel Cinematic Universe into a tizzy recently when he said that the films of Marvel Studios and other superhero movies alike were not what he considered cinema. Instead, he equated them to theme park rides and even took it a step further by saying movie theaters needed to support what he called “narrative films” instead of superhero movies. At the same time, he did acknowledge the hard work that goes into them, though he reaffirmed his belief that they are not truly cinema. But director Francis Ford Coppola took it a step further.

While speaking to journalists in Lyon, France after accepting the Prix Lumiere award for his overall contributions to cinema throughout his career, Coppola was asked about Martin Scorsese’s comments, and The Godfather saga fiilmmaker did not hold back when throwing shade at Marvel movies, reiterating again that they “are not cinema” but also adding that they are “despicable.” Find out the rest of the Francis Ford Coppola Marvel movie criticism below. Read More »

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martin scorsese director's cut

Martin Scorsese‘s movies are typically long – his latest, The Irishman, clocks in at 209 minutes. But some people (like me!) wouldn’t mind seeing even longer cuts of Scorsese’s films. Director’s cuts, if you will. But according to the man himself, you’re never going to see a Martin Scorsese director’s cut – at least not in the traditional sense. As Scorsese tells it, every theatrical cut he’s ever released counts as his “director’s cut,” and it’s the same for movies from other directors as well – unless there was some sort of studio interference.

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