Virtual Tribeca Film Festival in the Works

Virtual Tribeca Film Festival

The Tribeca Film Festival was supposed to run April 15 – 26 this year – but obviously, things have changed. The coronavirus caused the fest to postpone those dates, with alternative dates left up in the air. Now, it looks like Tribeca has found a solution: a virtual festival. Details are extremely slim at the moment, but Jane Rosenthal, the CEO of Tribeca Enterprises, made the announcement via social media.

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Tribeca Film Festival Postponed

The day has been full of news about events being canceled or postponed due to fears of the coronavirus (AKA COVID-19), and there doesn’t seem to be any sign of that stopping anytime soon. The latest event to fall victim to virus fears is the Tribeca Film Festival, which was due to kick-off on April 15. Now the fest is being postponed to a later date.

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tribeca 2020 line-up

The Tribeca Film Festival is coming in with a super-sized line-up of feature films, including a number of world premieres and critical hits from other festivals like TIFF, Sundance, and SXSW. The Trip to GreeceThe King of Staten Island, Shirleyand the TIFF hit Bad Education are among the movies featured in the Tribeca 2020 line-up, which includes 115 films from 124 filmmakers across 33 different countries. The annual New York City-based film festival runs from April 1526 and will, for the first time ever, also make its way to New Jersey.

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burning cane review

Burning Cane is a movie that flows over you: It’s less a structured narrative than a series of arcane images, each more beguiling and haunting than the last. The film, which deservedly won the Founders Award for best narrative feature at the Tribeca Film Festival, is an incredible debut for a 19-year-old filmmaker just out of high school — Burning Cane feels like the product of decades lived, of tragedies untold. But Phillip Youmans, who made this film at the age of 17 with Benh Zeitlin of Beasts of the Southern Wild as executive producer, proves to be an assured director who beautifully delivers a sprawling, hypnotic Southern Gothic drama about the last gasp of a disappearing world.

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goldie review

Goldie writer/director Sam de Jong comes from the world of music videos, and fittingly, the music video is both the driving narrative and visual inspiration of his debut feature film. But this is not some fairy-tale vision of New York: de Jong’s grainy, sun-kissed ode to the city of hustlers highlights the gritty, unforgiving world from which Slick Woods‘ titular Goldie is trying to break free. The result is a lively, kinetic film that dances between the natural and the fanciful, centered on a dynamo of a cinematic character played by the first-time actress.

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georgetown review

With Georgetown, Christoph Waltz joins the steady stream of actors making their transition behind the camera to make their highly anticipated directorial debuts. And indeed, the two-time Oscar winner seems like the perfect candidate to make that leap: a character actor with a keen eye for a riveting script and larger-than-life characters. But unfortunately, despite the talent that he frontloads into his debut film and despite the sordid real-life story upon which it’s based, Georgetown is a snooze.

Based on a real-life couple that was memorialized in The New York Times’ attention-grabbing article “The Worst Marriage in Georgetown,” the scandal at the center of Georgetown seems better suited for the D.C. gossip magazines or whispered furtively among the city’s elites at black tie parties. But in Georgetown, the story is given the same dramatic weight as a film about the president of the United States. And as electrifying as Waltz is to watch onscreen, his Ulrich Mott is no Richard Nixon.

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charlie says review

In the 50 years since the Manson Family committed the brutal murders that shook the nation, the cult and its infamous leader Charles Manson has never really left the public consciousness. And this year, the number of movies attempting to decrypt the notorious Manson and his all-consuming influence has ramped up, with everything from shockingly offensive horror films to star-studded Quentin Tarantino dramas taking on the cult leader. But what about the women who were under Manson’s thrall?

Charlie Says attempts to answer that question, examining the horrific Manson Family murders through the perspective of three of Manson’s most devout followers: Leslie Van Houten (Hannah Murray), Susan Atkins (Marianne Rendón), and Patricia Krenwinkel (Sosie Bacon). But despite the three women bringing this story to life from behind the camera — American Psycho‘s Mary Harron helms while frequent Harron collaborator Guinevere Turner wrote the script, and Dana Guerin produced — the film’s purported female gaze feels partially obscured.

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plus one review

Thirty years ago, When Harry Met Sally posed the question: Can men and women really be friends? While it never quite provided an answer, it did prove one satisfying thing — friendship may be forever, but watching friends fall in love is timeless.

Plus One, which follows two jaded college buddies Ben and Alice (Jack Quaid and Maya Erskine) who make a pact to be each other’s plus ones during a summer of endless weddings, pays appropriate homage to its lauded predecessor, but takes that delightful push-pull dynamic that When Harry Met Sally perfected to another level. Pen15 writers Jeff Chan and Andrew Rhymer unite with Erskine, the star and co-creator of the acclaimed Hulu series, to make their feature debut with this sharp, raunchy, and altogether winning film that is poised to be the rom-com of the summer.

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buffaloed review

Zoey Deutch is poised to be the next movie star. The actress showed signs of potential in the workplace rom-com Set It Up, but in Buffaloed, her natural breezy charisma is put on full blast. With director Tanya Wexler lending the crime dramedy a zippy, irreverent flair, Buffaloed becomes the vehicle for which Deutch can finally show off her chops.

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standing up falling down review

The homecoming comedy is the bread and butter of the indie circuit, and as poignant and humanist as the genre can be, it can also get old fast. It falls then, on the shoulders of the stars to keep the film from stumbling; thankfully in Standing Up, Falling Down, Ben Schwartz and Billy Crystal are more than up to the task.

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