/Filmcast Ep. 499 – The Top 10 Films of 2018

It’s that time of the year again where the cast unveil their top movies of the year. This round, David, Devindra, and Jeff don’t know what’s on each others’ lists. Tune in to see what’s in the box.

Read about the top five box office lessons in 2018 by David Chen and the power art in Spider-man: Into the Spider-Verse by Siddhant Adlakha.

Listen to David’s other podcast Write Along with writer C. Robert Cargill and Devindra’s new podcast Know More Tech, answering your question on the latest gadgets. You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Also, follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook.

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Hoai-Tran Bui’s Top 10 Movies of 2018

hoai-tran bui's top 10 of 2018

2018 has come and gone, and we’re 84 years older for it. But enough of my opining about what a terrible year it was (you’ll probably get plenty of that in everyone else’s pieces). I’m here to talk about the things I loved in 2018, and that was movies. I don’t ascribe to the belief that there are “good” or “bad” years for movies, there are just the movies that personally speak to you every year. And while that number can swell or dwindle each year, there will at least be a couple that unquestionably leave an impact. And for me, there are plenty, including my honorable mentions Leave No Trace, Mirai, Happy as Lazzaro, First Reformed, and Black Panther.

Now let’s get to what you really want to know: Here are my top 10 movies of 2018.

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Movies With 100% Rotten Tomatoes Scores

Universal acclaim is hard to come by. Even the most beloved film or TV show will have a few detractors. But every now and then, certain titles come along that end up without a single negative review…on Rotten Tomatoes, at least. As 2018 draws to a close, here are the handful of this year’s lucky TV shows and movies with 100% Rotten Tomatoes scores.

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/Filmcast Ep. 487 – Minding the Gap

David, Devindra, Jeff and Kristy discuss highlights from Fantastic Fest, Jeremy Saulnier’s latest, and the irreversible decision of listening to podcasts too quickly.

This will be Kristy’s last episode with the Slashfilmcast as a regular contributor, but do expect her in the future as an occasional guest. Check out more of her work at Decadent Criminals and follow her on Twitter. Thanks Kristy!

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Also, follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook.
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When filmmaker Bing Liu was a younger man shooting skateboarding videos of himself and two best friends Zack and Keire in their hometown of Rockford, Illinois, he likely didn’t realize that years later he would use that footage, as well as more deeply personal interviews with the two and many of their closest friends and family to compile a portrait of broken homes, domestic abuse, and undeniable impact of role models — both good and bad. While skateboarding begins as the central focus of the resulting documentary, Minding the Gap, it eventually becomes the much-needed escape from the real world for this kids — a real world that includes alcoholism and getting his girlfriend pregnant for Zack, and losing his father and coming to grips with being the only African-American kid among his group of friends for Keire.

Minding the Gap, which won a Special Jury Prize for Breakthrough Documentary Filmmaking and has additionally won countless Best Documentary and Audience awards along the 2018 festival circuit, explores the grueling transformation from adolescence to adulthood, made all the more painful since these three are exceptional on their boards and must give up their time a skate parks in order to get jobs to support themselves and their loved ones. There’s a confessional tone to the project that Liu himself takes part in when he interviews his mother about her abusive second husband, who mercilessly disciplined him as a child.

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Green Band Trailer

Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: What better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising?

This week we find ourselves starving in Ireland, watching some remarkable teenage nerds, killing the planet some more, documenting our teen years for posterity and reflection, and catching a different kind of western. Read More »