Long Shot

Update: On Twitter, Rogen has explained the reason for the title change. Our original article follows, and you can read his explanation below.

For a long time, director Jonathan Levine‘s new movie was going by its original title: Flarsky. And then someone at Lionsgate realized that calling a film Flarsky is an invitation to make no money at the box office because it sounds like an off-brand medicinal soda only available in three states, so they’ve changed it. Flarsky is dead. Meet Long Shot.

This film has a lot going for it. The always-funny and increasingly daring Seth Rogen. The always wonderful and increasingly-aware-of-her-comedy-chops Charlize Theron. Jonathan Levine, a skilled filmmaker whose filmography contains horror movies (All the Boys Love Mandy Lane), coming-of-age tales (The Wackness), zombie rom-coms (Warm Bodies), sensitive cancer dramas (50/50), and silly holiday comedies (The Night Before). It even made /Film’s list of most anticipated movies of 2019.

But it also had that title, which is the last name of the main character. A name that doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue. A name that feels like it should only be spoken by an angry authority figure while shaking his fist at the sky. It’s not a good title!

Anyway, it was announced a few weeks ago that Flarsky was going to premiere at this year’s SXSW Film Festival, but it no longer had a title. And now, Lionsgate has given it a new one: Long Shot. It’s a little dull and feels like it could get lost in a crowd, but hey, it’s not worse than Flarsky. Here’s how Deadline describes the film:

Rogen plays an unemployed journalist battered by his own misfortune, who decides to pursue Charlotte Field, his childhood crush and babysitter who now happens to be one of the most powerful and unattainable women on the planet.

Honestly, the most important part of this news is that it brings /Film writer Chris Evangelista’s ongoing battle with this movie over its title to its natural climax. Congrats, Chris. You won. Flarsky is no more.

Long Shot will premiere at the SXSW Film Festival in March. We’ll be in attendance and will let you know if Flarsky would’ve been a better title.

Update: Reporter Alisha Grauso asked Rogen about the title change on Twitter, and he responded:

It sounds like they’re really putting some thought into this instead of just slapping a name on it and calling it a day, so you’ve gotta give them credit there.

Cool Posts From Around the Web: