america ferrera leaving superstore

In this edition of TV Bits:

  • The CW is developing a romantic mystery from executive producer Rachel Bloom.
  • Sling TV is getting in on that watch party action.
  • Liv Tyler has left 9-1-1: Lone Star.
  • Sex Education season 3 adds Jason Isaacs, Jemima Kirke, and Dua Saleh.
  • The premiere of Superstore season 6 has been (slightly) delayed.
  • The Witcher recasts a new character ahead of season 2.
  • Watch a trailer for new episodes of Quibi’s 50 States of Fright.

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Superstore Season 5 Finale

Back at the beginning of March, which feels like years ago, actress America Ferrera announced she was leaving the NBC comedy series Superstore after five seasons. However, it sounds like the planned departure of her character Amy might have to wait until later. That’s because, like all of the shows shooting on the Universal Studios backlot, production on Superstore has been suspended due to coronavirus concerns, meaning the season finale never got a chance to shoot. Read More »

america ferrera leaving superstore

Superstore‘s favorite employee is clocking out for the last time. Star and executive producer America Ferrera is leaving Superstore at the end of the NBC comedy’s currently airing fifth season. The series has already been renewed through 2021 will continue on without their most valuable employee.

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TV in Trump's America

(Welcome to The Soapbox, the space where we get loud, feisty, and opinionated about something that makes us very happy…or fills us with indescribable rage. In this edition: the rise of political television in the wake of Donald Trump’s presidency.)

It started with Nazi symbols strewn across public transportation and billboards across D.C. and New York. No, it wasn’t the alarming rise of anti-Semitic vandalism that had skyrocketed in the first three months of the Trump administration. It was advertising The Man in the High Castle, the dystopian Amazon series based off the 1962 Philip K. Dick novel set in an alternate 1960s where the Axis powers won World War II.

And it was just the beginning in a recent surge in “newly relevant” and timely TV shows that took on new meaning after the election of Donald Trump to the White House. The Man in the High Castle kicked off a spate of fictional TV shows such as The Handmaid’s Tale and American Gods, whose stories were conceived long before the White House was even a glimmer in Trump’s eye. But these science-fiction and fantasy stories, at first cautionary or highly theoretical tales, now take on an eerie prescience as fiction and reality collide on the small screen.

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