Netflix’s The King is a reverse Hobbit: instead of adapting one book into three movies, it adapts three plays into one film. Shorn of Shakespearean dialogue, this loose retelling of Henry IV, Parts 1 & 2 and Henry V gets by on character and plot. Timothée Chalamet brings a brooding intensity to the Henry V role, which sees him following in the footsteps of classically trained luminaries like Sir Laurence Olivier and Sir Kenneth Branagh. That he can hold his own as a screen presence, even in comparison to thespians such as those, bodes well for his starring role in next year’s Dune.

The King also reunites director David Michôd with Joel Edgerton and Ben Mendolsohn, two actors who broke out internationally after appearing in Michôd’s 2010 Australian crime drama, Animal Kingdom. Edgerton serves as Michôd’s co-writer here, just as he did for the 2014 dystopian outback Western, The Rover, starring Guy Pearce. Michôd brings back Robert Pattinson from that movie; like Chalamet, Pattinson is no stranger to heartthrob status, and he’s set to headline a future tentpole (just a little movie called The Batman).

The King arrives in a post-Game of Thrones landscape where at-home audiences have become inured to watching court intrigue play out in medieval settings. Yet its source material predates Game of Thrones by centuries. Writer George R.R. Martin drew from the same period of history as Shakespeare’s Henriad, the cycle of plays that this movie partially adapts. Among other things, The King depicts the muddy hell of the Battle of Agincourt, the original inspiration for the Battle of the Bastards. This may not be Westeros, but war is still bloody and mud underfoot is an apt symbol for the innocence-to-experience arc that Chalamet’s conflicted prince undergoes as he dons his father’s crown and enters the moral quagmire of adulthood.

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joel edgerton star wars

Ewan McGregor may not be the only familiar face returning for Disney+’s upcoming Obi-Wan Kenobi TV series. Another actor that could make a potential return to the Star Wars franchise is Joel Edgerton, who played young Uncle Owen in the prequel films. While nothing has been confirmed, a recent interview suggests that we could see him return in the Obi-Wan series.

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Boy Erased Trailer

Even though it’s 2018, there are still religious zealots out there who believe it is their duty to help so-called sinful homosexuals pray their gay away. In fact, according to a new trailer for the harrowing drama Boy Erased, there are currently 77,000 people being held in conversion therapy centers by religious figures forcing people to question their identity and bury who they really are. And as you can see from this new trailer, these places are not welcoming or helpful in the least. Read More »

boy erased trailer

Writer/director Joel Edgerton’s Boy Erased starts off resembling a prison drama. Lucas Hedges’ Jared Eamons shows up to Love in Action, a conversion therapy program designed to “cure” gay people, and must surrender his possessions. An orderly tells him they will call random numbers in his cell phone during the day. In addition, the original stories in his notebook might be subject to confiscation if they reflect any of the desires that the center attempts to purge.

Even as imposing as Love in Action is, the real prison in Boy Erased is Jared’s own thoughts. In a remarkably subdued performance, Hedges shows that his character’s mind, racked with guilt and shame his community has told him to feel, will be the site of the most important reckoning in the film. Jared is uncertain in how to navigate the cruelness of conversion therapy, either by giving in or resisting full stop. The hesitancy in responding externally plunges him deeper into his own mind and memory.

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boy erased trailer

After trying his hand at the psychological horror genre with his directorial debut The GiftJoel Edgerton pivots to dramatically different fare for his next film, Boy Erased. Based on the memoir by Garrard ConleyBoy Erased follows a gay teen (Lucas Hedges) who is outed and forced to attend gay conversion therapy — or else be shunned by his entire community.

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The King cast

Netflix’s upcoming movie The King has found its subjects.

Director David Michod (Animal Kingdom, War Machine) begins production tomorrow on his William Shakespeare-inspired epic movie, and he’s pulled together a pretty stellar cast to join previously-announced stars Timothee Chalamet (Call Me By Your Name) and Joel Edgerton (Warrior). Read on to learn about the rest of The King cast and who they’ll play in this story of war, legacy, and nobility.
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bright sequel

Netflix is still moving forward with their Bright sequel, and they’ve just hired a writer to pen the latest orc cop adventure. Evan Spiliotopoulos, who co-wrote Disney’s live-action Beauty and the Beast, will write the script for director David Ayer.

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Bright Honest Trailer

Netflix’s first blockbuster took the gritty cop drama of movies like Training Day and End of Watch and mixed them with the magic and fantasy of Hellboy and Lord of the Rings. If that premise sounds like it would make for an awesome movie, you’d be right. But unfortunately we don’t live in the universe where that movie exists. Instead we got David Ayer‘s misfire Bright.

Bright follows the unlikely partnership of Will Smith, a human police officer, paired with Joel Edgerton, an orc police officer. Instead of the tension that exists between various races on the streets, we get the tension that exists between different species. And for some reason, as Honest Trailers points out, the world the story exists in isn’t much different from today’s world despite having magic be part of it for over 200 years. In fact, it’s almost exactly the same, and that’s just stupid. Read More »

Red Sparrow Francis Lawrence Interview

With Red Sparrow, the gloves are coming off for director Francis Lawrence. The filmmaker behind ConstantineThe Hunger Games sequels, and the “Bad Romance” music video has made an often unsettling thriller. Mary-Louise Parker, in a “no such thing as small parts” sort of small part, brings great levity to the movie, but light popcorn fare this adaptation of author Jason Matthews‘ novel is not.

After the success of the three Hunger Games sequels, Lawrence has served up a pitch dark film about the brutal, unforgiving, and cold world of Russian Intelligence. The story begins with the immersive and eye-catching visuals expected from Lawrence. In an eight-minute sequence cutting between Jennifer Lawrence and Joel Edgerton‘s characters, the director tells a lot of story with such precision. It’s a strong hook that we recently discussed with Lawrence along with the film’s style, lessons from his music video work, collaborating with Jennifer Lawrence, and more.

Check out our Red Sparrow Francis Lawrence interview to get insight from the director on his latest film.

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bright reviews

“It’s made for the fans, not the critics,” is an increasingly common defense that filmmakers and actors are falling back on these days. Now, it’s apparently a shield for every middling blockbuster that critics savaged, from superhero movies that do have a built-in audience, to an original Netflix film that…doesn’t.

And it’s what Bright star Joel Edgerton is sticking by. Bright was David Ayer‘s sci-fi crime movie for Netflix that broke the streaming service’s records for its original films, garnering it a sequel and apparent immunity to negative critical reaction.

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