2001 A Space Odyssey Exhibit

Calling all Kubrick fans: the Museum of the Moving Image will open its pod bay doors next year for a 2001: A Space Odyssey exhibit. The exhibit will contain the most comprehensive look at the film ever put together in a museum. Costumes, concept art, test footage and more from Stanley Kubrick’s iconic sci-fi epic will be on display starting January 2020.

IndieWire has the exclusive on the 2001: A Space Odyssey exhibit. The exhibition will feature “original artifacts from international collections and from the Stanley Kubrick Archive at the University of the Arts London, as well as from the Museum’s own collection. In addition to exploring Kubrick’s influences, his obsessive research, and his innovative production process, the exhibition looks at the film’s widespread influence on cinema, design, painting, architecture, and advertising.”

Kubrick’s 2001 needs no introduction. This monumental achievement in filmmaking baffled audiences upon its initial release, but quickly earned a reputation for being the groundbreaking masterwork it truly is. Now, half a century later, A Space Odyssey is heralded as one of the greatest films of all time, even as much of it remains impenetrable for many viewers.

In the 1968 movie, “An imposing black structure provides a connection between the past and the future in this enigmatic adaptation of a short story by revered sci-fi author Arthur C. Clarke. When Dr. Dave Bowman (Keir Dullea) and other astronauts are sent on a mysterious mission, their ship’s computer system, HAL, begins to display increasingly strange behavior, leading up to a tense showdown between man and machine that results in a mind-bending trek through space and time.”

The Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey exhibit assembled at Deutsches Filminstitut & Filmmuseum in Frankfurt to mark last year’s 50th anniversary of the film’s release. It will launch at the Museum of the Moving Image on January 18, and run through July 19, 2020, with tickets on sale this September. The exhibition will also include a series of 70mm screenings of the film.

This is assuredly going to be a huge deal for cinephiles dying to get an up-close-and-personal look at the elements that went into crafting Kubrick’s movie. If you’re impatient and want more behind-the-scenes details, I highly recommend you check out Michael Benson’s invaluable book Space Odyssey: Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece, which covers nearly every single facet of the film’s creation from beginning to end.

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