punch-drunk love

Adam Sandler is a beloved figure, even when he pumps out kind-of-awful movies. But he balances those types of films out with the occasional turn in a genuinely good movie – like the recent Uncut Gems, or in Paul Thomas Anderson‘s fantastic Punch-Drunk Love. Anderson’s film is the gold standard for “good Adam Sandler performances,” but according to the Sandman himself, he was very nervous about taking the role. In a recent interview, Sandler revealed that after watching Anderson’s Magnolia, he grew worried that he was going to “ruin” Punch-Drunk Love.

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cooper hoffman

Here’s a story that might make you emotional: Cooper Hoffman, son of the late, great Philip Seymour Hoffman, is the lead in Paul Thomas Anderson‘s new movie. The elder Hoffman and Anderson made several films together, so there’s something bittersweet about him now working with Hoffman’s son. Also in the film: Alana Haim, of the band HAIM – for whom Anderson has directed several videos.

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paul thomas anderson next movie cast

Uncut Gems co-director Benny Safdie has tried his hand at acting before, notably playing Robert Pattinson’s brother in Good Time, which he directed with his brother Josh Safdie. But Benny Safdie is stepping in front of the camera without his brother backing him, joining the cast of Paul Thomas Anderson‘s new movie in a major role.

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new Paul Thomas Anderson movie cast

Paul Thomas Anderson‘s still-untitled next film may have just found its first official cast member: Bradley Cooper (The Midnight Meat Train). Cooper is in talks to join Anderson’s movie, a coming-of-age drama set in a high school in the San Fernando Valley in the 1970s. Plot details remain very hush-hush, but the project is said to involve multiple storylines like Anderson’s Boogie Nights and Magnolia. No word on who Cooper might play, but I’ll go out on a limb and guess he’s not one of the high school kids.

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New Paul Thomas Anderson Movie Heads to MGM

New Paul Thomas Anderson Movie MGM

Paul Thomas Anderson‘s latest film, an untitled coming-of-age pic set in a high school in the 1970s, is packing its bags and moving to a new location. The film was originally set to be released by Focus Features but will now hail from MGM. A “budgetary issue” is being cited as the reason for the move. Plot details are vague, but the movie apparently follows several different storylines, similar to Anderson’s Magnolia.

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Vintage Ghostbusters Featurette

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, watch a vintage 1984 featurette on the making of Ghostbusters, revealing funny behind the scenes footage, a look at the creating of sets and props, and more. Plus, Adam Savage shows off the frog props he has from the pivotal scene in Magnolia where they rain down from the sky, and some new stories from behind the scenes of Saturday Night Live are told by John Mulaney, Eddie Murphy, and more. Read More »

The 92nd Academy Awards are almost upon us, and if there’s one certainty going into Oscar night, it’s that some worthy talent in some category will be overlooked in favor of a lesser talent. No nominee or winner is undeserving of recognition, but snubs are also an essential part of Oscar history and directors are not immune to them. In fact, some of the greatest directors of all time have gone their whole career without receiving a proper Best Director Oscar.

Film is fundamentally a collaborative medium, and we’re only a little over a month removed from a decade where the movie industry shifted to a more producer-controlled landscape in which IP-friendly tentpoles seemed to occupy all the best real estate. Yet the best directors, the ones with the most singular voice or vision, do tend to bolster the case for auteur theory, whereby a director can be considered a film’s primary author. With that in mind, here’s a roughly chronological look at ten great film authors eluded by the golden statuette for Best Director. With each name on this list, we’ll be seeking to answer three questions: who did they lose to (if they were ever nominated), what film or films should they have won for, and why, oh, why didn’t they ever win?

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Over nearly 25 years, Paul Thomas Anderson has established himself as one of the great artists of modern American cinema. His earlier works were defined by the style of filmmakers who inspired him, from Martin Scorsese to Robert Altman. As he’s grown, though, it’s become clear that Anderson is also an incredibly skilled director of actors, not just content to populate his films with recognizable faces and sit back to let them do the work. His eight films encompass a deep and rich span of American history, and those films have boasted some powerhouse performances. Here, then, are the 20 best performances in PTA’s films, in ranked order. Read More »

The magnolia is a perennial flower: its recurring bloom signals spring’s arrival and the bark of the tree it grows from can be used to treat anxiety and cancer. Magnolia Boulevard is a street that runs through Burbank, California—the media capital of the world, just miles from Hollywood and downtown Los Angeles. Neither of these things is explained outright in Magnolia, writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson’s 1999 opus, but even without awareness of them, the viewer begins to form an intuitive understanding of how the beauty, complexity, and fragility of a flower may relate to the tapestry of lives on display in the movie.

Magnolia is a young man’s movie. It’s a crinkled, wet valentine to the Valley (San Fernando, where Burbank is located and where the film is set). Anderson was still in his twenties when he made it, and juxtaposed with the mature back half of his filmography to date, it pulses like a drop-kicked dog without a leash. Sometimes it barks off into the unknown with elliptical subplots. Sometimes it chases its own tail, looping back on itself with crescendoing crosscuts. Though it all, hangs a persistent storm cloud of emotion, the kind that enslaves hurt people until they’re liberated by a rain of frogs.

After the success of Boogie Nights, Anderson’s exuberant porn-family film, New Line Cinema gave the young filmmaker carte blanche to make an achingly personal, 3-hour drama with an ensemble cast and the biggest budget of his career. Blame the audience, blame the Internet, blame risk-averse studio executives, but Hollywood’s gatekeepers don’t allow many movies like that to enter the multiplex anymore. In Collateral, Tom Cruise’s steely hitman pegged L.A. as a place that was “too sprawled out, disconnected.” In Magnolia, he plays Frank T.J. Mackey, a misogynistic seduction seminar leader whose story intertwines with that of other characters to form the obverse narrative, whereby everything is interconnected despite the ungainly sprawl.

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New Paul Thomas Anderson Movie high school

Paul Thomas Anderson has decided to take a break from directing Haim videos and return to movies. Anderson has his first post-Phantom Thread feature already lined-up: a high school movie set in the 1970s. Anderson will write and direct the movie, which is set to begin production next year. This won’t be any ordinary coming-of-age high school flick, though. Instead, the premise will focus on a teen who is also a famous child actor.

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