J.A. was telling us that there’s a heavy focus on suspense in this film. There was a little bit of that in the first Jurassic World, but it was more focused on the spectacle of the new park and the disaster movie aspect of things going wrong. Hearing that this one was going rely more on suspense did that make you more excited to do this? I can imagine the worst thing for you to do is read the script and think “We just did this.”

Chris Pratt: It was really exciting to understand we were doing something really different. I was thrilled when I got the script. I think people have high expectations for sequels. I think with this one those expectations will be met, if not surpassed. It does something different. It opens up a new chapter. It’s called Fallen Kingdom. The Kingdom of this movie is people stuck on an island with dinosaurs freaking out and killing everyone. That is falling and we’re moving onto something else.

The first one was a disaster film. Shifting the tone over to suspense is really nice because I think with suspense you can do a lot with very little. You don’t see Jaws for a good two thirds of the movie. You know he’s there, there’s music, you see the evidence of it… Not to say we’re doing exactly that. I don’t think that necessarily works as much anymore. I was just watching Jaws the other day with my son and he’s like “Where’s the shark?”

And you’re like “Disowned!”

Chris Pratt: Yeah, disowned! Get the fuck outta here! He’s four and during the third act battle I was like “I’ll show you the shark, get in here!” He was like “Aaaaaaaaahhh” and I was like [sternly] “You’ll sit and watch! You earn this!”

What’s it like working opposite Jeff Goldblum?

Chris Pratt: Man, he’s amazing. A huge part of the success of Jurassic World was the success of Jurassic Park. It all started in ’93 with them and with him. I know that we had the blessing of Steven Spielberg and Universal and fans, but it’s nice that he signs up to do this movie because in a way it’s giving it his blessing. That was really cool. He’s a terrific actor and maybe the kindest actor out there. He’s really cool and smart and funny and interesting. It’s really awesome to have him in this movie.

He has such a unique rhythm in how he plays things. He’s different from everybody else. I feel like if I was in a scene with him I’d just become the kid that saw Jurassic Park and I’d be watching him instead of being in the scene.

Chris Pratt: I feel like if I answer that I’ll be giving away too much, but you do have to get it out of the way when you work with someone like Jeff Goldblum or I just did Guardians with Kurt Russell… You work with these people who are icons… It’s a two step process. First, you have to be authentic and let them know just how crazy about them that you are. You make that really short and brief. You get that out of the way so you’re not a liar or the guy that doesn’t acknowledge them. You pay your respects.

After that you immediately move to step B which is you become a peer and a collaborator or else you lose their respect. If every time you see them you go “Dude, this is so crazy!” you might not be the right guy for this job. Even when you’re feeling that the third, fourth, fifth, sixth day you work together you kind of have to bury that and get right to the work.

It’s a strange thing being famous. I’m certainly not an icon like a Kurt Russell or a Jeff Goldblum. They are icons and maybe one day I will be, but if their journey is similar at all to mine you don’t really feel that way about yourself, so if people feel that way about you it’s kind of an uncomfortable situation that you politely and patiently wait for to be over so you can get back to being normal again. So you get through that stuff. You go “Oh my God, I love you! I can’t believe we’re working together!” and then you get to work.

All the great Michael Crichton stories had a little something on their mind. They weren’t just adventure plots. They always had some kind of commentary. What do you think is on this movie’s mind?

Chris Pratt: [Pauses] It feels relevant to now and I think part of that has to do with technology, which is not necessarily something that doesn’t serve the greater good, but is valuable. Maybe we put aside moral dilemmas because you can make money. It has a little to do with greed. That’s a theme that resonated in the first movie as well and continues to resonate in this series. It’s a cautionary tale against greed and over-ambition and a lack of respect for the natural order and confidence in our ability to control that which we can’t control.

Which is Dr. Malcolm’s stance in that first movie, so it makes sense that he’s back in play here.

Chris Pratt: Yeah, that’s right.

Who are the real monsters: the humans or the dinosaurs?

Chris Pratt: That’s a good question! [laughs]

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