Despite his huge commercial success, massive fan base and seemingly super-heroic ability to take criticism, Damon Lindelof is only human. The co-creator of Lost and co-writer of Prometheus hears a lot of negative comments about his work and, in a new interview, admits that it gets to him. He also admits that high-concept, sometimes ambiguous projects are the kind of stuff he loves and he wants the fans to engage with. So it goes with the territory.

Lindelof spoke to the Wall Street Journal about these things and more in specific relation to the semi-chilly online reaction to Prometheus. He reveals that he was one of the leading voices behind the viral marketing component of the film and believes the online reception of a film is extremely important, even if the studios haven’t yet taken that into consideration. He also comments on some “errors” in the film and more. Read excerpts after the jump. Read More »


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Putting on a wig and fake boobs to portray Madea has brought Tyler Perry more fame and fortune than most of us could ever dream of, but even so it seems the filmmaker/actor is eager to explore new horizons. Earlier this week, we got to see him play cat and mouse with a crazed Jack Shephard in the Alex Cross trailer, and now Perry’s talking about moving on to a sci-fi project. Because, it turns out, he’s a huge fan of the genre — though like many other sci-fi aficionados, he was somewhat less than enthralled with Ridley Scott’s Prometheus. Read his comments after the jump.

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Whether or not you liked Ridley Scott‘s Prometheus, you have to admit, the scientists in it were pretty crappy. They touch potentially hazardous foreign substances, interact with alien species, and poorly communicate with their crew. All in all, very dangerous stuff. A comedy troupe called Barely Political noticed that too and created what they’re calling a “Prometheus Pre-Prequel” featuring Weyland Industries scientists training for their trip. It’s very funny stuff. Check it out below. Read More »

On the grand list of Big Questions left by Ridley Scott‘s Prometheus, one item that probably falls somewhere down in the lower third is “what the hell did David say to the Engineer?”

Well, we can’t tell you specifically what the black goo is, or what it has to do with the green goo, or what the sea monkey in Holloway’s eye was all about, but we can answer that burning lower third mystery. (And a burning lower third mystery sounds like something you should really get checked out.)

Here’s how this works: the ancient language being studied by David (Michael Fassbender) is actually Proto-Indo-European (PIE), and the man giving him a hologram lesson is played by Dr. Anil Biltoo of the SOAS Language Centre in London. Dr. Biltoo is also the language consultant for the film, and he has provided a translation of David’s dialogue from his meeting with the Engineer. Read More »

The Daily were given a glimpse at how some of the computer-animated visual effects were created for Ridley Scott‘s Prometheus. Find out how WETA created the opening sequence featuring the “incredible disintegration of the Engineer as his DNA unwinds and he falls into the waterfall of primordial Earth.” Also take a look at how MPC created “the movie’s incredible ships and planetary environments, including the fateful crash of The Prometheus and the fleeing Engineer’s Juggernaut.” Watch both of these visual effects breakdowns now, embedded after the jump.

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Whether you love Prometheus, hate it, or just find the whole thing frustrating, it’s a week later and Ridley Scott‘s film is still one of the hottest topics in the movie world. We learned this week that the film is going to be augmented by 20 to 30 minutes of deleted scenes when it hits DVD and Blu-ray later this year, with some of those scenes available only as standalone deleted options, and others viewable through a branching extended cut.

While we’ll have to wait a while to see much of that footage, we do now have a bunch of great photos taken on set of the prosthetics, makeup and costume worn by Daniel James and Ian Whyte, as two of the film’s Engineers, and of Matthew Rook as the Elder Engineer. That last character didn’t make the final cut, however, and in fact these photos suggest that there’s more to the ‘sacrifice’ opening of the film than ended up in the release version. Check out the pics below. Read More »

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Watch ‘The Sound of Prometheus’

I think everyone who sees Prometheus will agree that the film is beautifully made, from the perspective of how Ridley Scott and his crew created the film’s environments and settings. Visually, Prometheus is often stunning, and that design is complemented by an expertly-crafted sonic palette.

The latest episode of the SoundWorks Collection’s “The Sound of…” series focuses on Prometheus. Through clips and interviews with the sound crew, we gain some insight into how the sounds of the film were generated. Check out the featurette below. Read More »

Red Letter Media, best known for their brilliant and funny dissections of George Lucas’ Star Wars prequels, has just posted a hilarious video talking about Ridley Scott‘s Prometheus. Since they don’t have the movie itself to draw clips from, the video is just one guy frying his friends brain with four straight minutes of unanswered questions and plot holes from the film. Some are easily answered, others are not, but they’re all really humorous. Check out the video below. Read More »

The 15 Big Ideas in Prometheus

Prometheus is going to be a controversial film. As a prequel to Alien, and a “summer” movie, it has a certain suspense / horror / sci-fi pedigree that generally belies serious conversation. There’s no particular reason Prometheus should have “big” themes running through it, any more than Battleship or MIB 3 would, except for the salient fact that we believe director Ridley Scott has embedded some interesting nuggets throughout, much as he did with Blade Runner.

So what are these “big” ideas? What are the questions and themes Prometheus tackles throughout its two-hour running time? We’ll start with the easy ones, and then progress toward the more philosophical questions.

Note: Massive thematic SPOILERS follow, naturally. Read More »