westworld season 2 review

Joanna and David are back to recap a new season of Westworld! In this episode, special guest Paul Scheer joins us to discuss our thoughts on season 1, what we’re looking forward to most in season 2, our thoughts on Jonathan Nolan’s rickroll, and Paul’s recent panel with the showrunners and actors of Westworld. Be sure to check out Paul’s podcast, How Did This Get Made.

Thanks for listening to this season of Decoding Westworld. You can back this season of the show on Kickstarter. Want to sponsor an episode? Get in touch with us at decodingwestworld(at)gmail(dot)com. Thanks!  Read More »

Was Avengers: Infinity War or Avengers 4 harder to make for the Russo brothers? Why didn’t Comcast win the bid to pick up 20th Century Fox? Want to see some LEGO The Incredibles gameplay footage? Did you hear Avengers: Infinity War is now the second most expensive movie ever made? Did you know Adam Sandler was considered for the voice of Rocket Raccoon? All that and more in this edition of Superhero Bits. Read More »

Daily Podcast: The Movies That Define Us

On the April 20, 2018 episode of /Film Daily, /Film editor-in-chief Peter Sciretta is joined by /Film managing editor Jacob Hall, weekend editor Brad Oman, senior writer Ben Pearson and writers Hoai-Tran Bui and Chris Evangelista to talk about the movies that define us.

You can subscribe to /Film Daily on iTunes, Google Play, Overcast, Spotify and all the popular podcast apps (here is the RSS URL if you need it).

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Deadpool 2 Peter Twitter

The biggest breakout star of the new Deadpool 2 trailer wasn’t Deadpool or Cable. Instead, it was Peter, the average-seeming individual played by Catastrophe star Rob Delaney. If you . need more Peter action, you’re in luck: the character has his own (verified) Twitter account.

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/Answers: Our Favorite Stoners in the Movies

best movie stoners

Every week in /Answers, we answer a new pop culture-related question. In this edition, tying in with the date on the calendar, we’re asking “Who is your favorite movie stoner?”

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Cool Posts From Around the Web:

Cargo Review

Netflix’s “zom-dram” Cargo – what’s essentially an Australian The Walking Dead spinoff – boasts far more inspiration from survival instincts over typical rotter squashing. No tactical military platoons, just a father and child fighting against outbreak paranoia. Supplies are scarce, native tribes echo ritualistic thinking and do I detect a hint of anti-fracking commentary? Man’s mutilation of Mother Nature pits industrial complexes against respect for cavernous and magnificent brushlands in this greed-poisoned flatlands march. An environmentally sound subgenre take that’s powered by 2018’s strongest horror theme: parental fears and intergenerational unrest.

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mary shelley review

There’s an imaginative, hugely entertaining movie to be made out of that fated rainy summer day in Geneva that spawned some of the most pivotal horror novels in history. Mary Shelley is not that movie.

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I feel pretty interview

The latest vehicle starring Amy Schumer may appear on the surface to be a romantic comedy about an insecure woman who gets a blow to the head and suddenly sees herself as the most beautiful woman she’s ever seen. However, the heart and soul of I Feel Pretty is the bond Schumer’s Renee has with her long-time best friends Jan (Busy Phillips of Cougar Town and Vice Principals) and Vivian (SNL’s Aidy Bryant, in her follow-up to last year’s The Big Sick).

Marking the directing debut from popular writing team Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein (co-writers on Never Been Kissed, He’s Just Not That Into You, and How to Be Single), I Feel Pretty speaks a sometimes brutal truth about how women’s self-esteems are chipped away systematically on a daily basis by the world at large. But using humor, it also delivers a message about empowering oneself and not giving a toss what the world thinks about you. On top of that, it’s also a sweet love story and a tale of a woman who infiltrates a high-end makeup company and gets them to more effectively market their products to all women.

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Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Revisited

(Welcome to Road to Infinity War, a new series where we revisit the first 18 movies of the Marvel Cinematic Universe and ask “How did we get here?” In this edition: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 beautifully blends sci-fi craziness with an examination of anger, pain, and cycles of abuse.)

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 is oodles of fun, but it spends its first few scenes articulating a thoughtful mission statement. Its prologue, set 34 years in the past, features a budding romance later revealed to have twisted implications, but the love on display is still real. Following this comes the Guardians’ raucous reintroduction in present day, a battle against an inter-dimensional beast in a scene bursting with visual slepndour. Its out-of-this-world action however, is backgrounded and out of focus. The spotlight instead falls on a joyous Baby Groot, dancing his way through the scene as the other Guardians – Star Lord, Drax, Gamora and Rocket – take turns caring for him as if he were their child. When the Guardians collect their reward for this battle, they stand in contrast to the gilded Sovereign, a homogenous people genetically engineered to be perfect, but a people to whom slights and insults are unforgivable. The Guardians, on the other hand, are a group of broken characters from wildly different origins, but in their case, redemption isn’t off the table.

In short, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 is about the complicated relationships we rarely confront. It’s told against a backdrop of action and space-opera, but its focus is on a family of imperfect beings, searching for catharsis while helping one another other find some form of redemption. It may very well be Marvel’s most mature film, zeroing in on the emotional complexities of abuse carried forward into adulthood. But it also solidifies the Studio’s new political direction, acting as the first in a trilogy of films (along with Thor: Ragnarok and Black Panther) whose narrative is adjacent to colonial history.

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If you follow filmmakers and film critics on social media, you’ve probably already encountered the #FilmStruck4. Initiated by Filmstruck, the streaming service dedicated to classic and arthouse films, the hashtag challenges you to pick the four films that “define” you. And now everyone is chiming in.

So the /Film staff decided to participate as well, but do so on a slightly larger scale. We have all come together to share the four movies that “define” us. Specifically, we’re sharing the four movies that define our taste and love of cinema, not necessarily our favorite movies of all time (we’ve got that covered elsewhere).

What four films define you? Definitely chime in with a comment after you check out our selections!

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