Ape Meets Girl Gremlins Print

Just over a week ago, we featured a round-up of some fantastic new artwork from Hero Complex Gallery that debuted at New York Comic-Con 2017. One of our favorites was a new piece from Ape Meets Girl (aka Kevin M. Wilson) paying tribute to Joe Dante‘s horror comedy Gremlins, and now we can offer you a much closer look at the print to see how much detail went into it for all you movie and TV nerds out there.

The Gremlins print by Ape Meets Girl is called “The Old Curiosity Shop,” named for the hole-in-the-wall antique market where inventor Randall Peltzer comes into possession of a mysterious creature called a Mogwai. While the shop in the movie was full of random antique goods from around the world, the shop as depicted in the Ape Meets Girl Gremlins print is full of Easter eggs from your favorite movies and TV show. There are 84 altogether, and not only can we can help you spot every single one of them, but we have high-resolution images and an answer key that make them infinitely easier to spot. Read More »

Jackie Chan - Morning Watch

(The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.)

In this edition, a video essay explores why Jackie Chan should be considered a master of silent comedy on the big screen. Plus, watch a short film called Lemon Drink about a woman who realizes her boyfriend only speaks in movie quotes, and see Adam Scott and Ben Schwartz respond to some wild Parks and Recreation fan theories. Read More »

Avengers: No Surrender

Want to make candy apples shaped like Mjolnir? What is Avengers: No Surrender doing with all of the superhero team members in 2018? What are Iron Fist and Luke Cage doing on the set of the second season of the latter’s Netflix series? Which classic superhero almost had a cameo in Batman vs Two-Face? Is Baby Driver star Eiza Gonzalez going to play Catwoman in the DCEU? All that and more in this edition of Superhero Bits. Read More »

thor ragnarok

On the October 19, 2017 episode of /Film Daily, Peter Sciretta is joined by Ben Pearson and Chris Evangelista to talk about the latest news, including Venom movie rumors, a female Thor film, Morgan Spurlock’s Simpsons mockumentary, and the truth about The Snowman. And in the Mail Bag, we’ll answer a question about how studios screen movies for press and the trend of movie sites publishing spoilers earlier than ever before.

You can subscribe to /Film Daily on iTunes, Google Play, Overcast and all the popular podcast apps (here is the RSS URL if you need it).
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Thor Ragnarok review round-up

After 17 films in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, you’d think that superhero movies might start feeling a little stale. And while that might be applicable to some of the action beats in Thor: Ragnarok, the film as a whole is as fresh as it gets. This is a full-fledged comedy that also happens to be a vibrant, colorful, intergalactic eyeful that has a couple Avengers in it as lead characters.

But even though the film isn’t out yet, its comedy bona fides have been well-established in the trailers and marketing materials so far. So what do critics think about it? Check out our Thor Ragnarok review round-up to find out.
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hocus-pocus spell book

(Welcome to Nostalgia Bomb, a series where we take a look back on beloved childhood favorites and discern whether or not they’re actually any good. In this edition: Kenny Ortega’s beloved-by-a-generation Hocus Pocus.)

Hocus Pocus has existed since the dawn of time…or at least that is how I feel. I was only two years old when it came out in 1993 and I have been watching it since then. I cannot recall my first viewing of it, or my second, or my tenth. I was simply too young. Sure, I love plenty of movies that are much older than I am, but for most of those films I was a fully conscious child viewing them. There was a me before the movie. However, like Labyrinth and The Princess Bride, Hocus Pocus is a tale as old as time. There isn’t really a Vanessa BHP (Before Hocus Pocus) only a Hocus Pocus BV (Before Vanessa). I have been watching it since before I knew I was watching it. It was as much a constant in my life as my own parents.

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Geostorm trailer 2

Every week in /Answers, we attempt to answer a new pop culture-related question. With Geostorm invading theaters this weekend (and not being screened for critics), we’re asking “What unapologetically stupid movie do actually love with all of your heart?” Low-budget cult items like Plan 9 From Outer Space and The Room were disqualified – our choices had to be major movies that somehow got made by human adults. Read More »

John Carpenter album

Not only is John Carpenter an acclaimed filmmaker behind some of the best horror movies ever made – HalloweenThe ThingThey Live – he’s also the creator of some of the best horror movie music. Just as E.T. wouldn’t be nearly as effective without John Williams’ orchestral score, Halloween would be a lesser film without Carpenter’s eerie yet simple themes, made up of repeating piano melodies that alternate between sporadic and heart-attack fast. Horror movie music wouldn’t be the same without Carpenter’s contributions, which are just as exciting and influential as his films. While other horror soundtrack composers tend to encroach on an audience with loud, stunning musical cues, Carpenter’s scores hang back; waiting, biding their time, and building dread.

Carpenter is releasing a new album, Anthology: Movie Themes 1974-1998, a collection of 13 of his movie themes re-recorded with his touring band. And it’s pretty great. So join us: we’re going through the new John Carpenter album track by track.

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mr robot undo review
(We’re going to kickstart our weekly discussion of USA’s Mr. Robot season 3 by answering one simple question: who had the biggest mental breakdown in this week’s episode?)

I feel like Mr. Robot has become somewhat cheekier since the last season, eschewing some of its self-serious cinematic techniques for cute gimmicks — like the mute button from the last episode and the omnipresent emoji faces from today’s episode. Of course, I know that Mr. Robot did that for a full episode in season 2 with the sitcom subplot, but that felt more audacious than whimsical.

That’s not to say Mr. Robot has suddenly become a comedy. Things are still dire and darker than ever — the looming emotionless emoji staring Elliot down on the subway is a perfect indication of that — but it doesn’t always have to be a soul-crushing experience. Bobby Cannavale’s gleefully malicious character added to that tone in the season premiere and his absence is felt in the second episode, which once again delves into the nature of Elliot’s depression. To that end, “Undo” is both stagnant and busy story-wise, with the show and Elliot trying to rebuild what he broke. But the episode is thrown for a loop after a major character death that sent shock waves…absolutely nowhere. But it’s too early to tell how this shocking death, and this soft “reboot” episode that calls back to so many elements of season 1, will affect the rest of the story.

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David Fincher video essay

What makes David Fincher such an acclaimed filmmaker? What is it about his style and grasp of material that makes some cinephiles go nuts and sing his praises? A new video may have just discovered Fincher’s secret: he hijacks your eyes with the use of camera movement. Watch the David Fincher video essay below.

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