From TV star to movie star and now moving into the producer role, Adam Scott is continuing his plan for world domination. He and his wife, Naomi Scott, have started a new production company called Gettin’ Rad Productions. For their first foray into feature films, they’ve purchased the rights to Chuck Klosterman‘s book Downtown OwlOren Uziel (Mortal Kombat: Rebirth) has been hired to adapt the story about several different characters who live in a fictional North Dakota town where pop culture doesn’t exist.

Read more about the film after the jump and watch Gettin’ Rad’s first TV project, The Greatest Event in Television History, starring Scott and Jon Hamm. Read More »

.

Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

chuckint-1

In his new book of essays, Eating the Dinosaur, pop culture critic Chuck Klosterman posits that “as a species we have never been less human than we are right now.” Part of the reason why this has happened, he says, is that our growing consumption of media, movies, and entertainment has made it so that “we can’t really differentiate between real and unreal images.” He concludes that we thus, “no longer have freedom to think whatever we want.” For instance, the words, “basketball game,” instantly trigger a mental image of the NBA before (rather than?) a memory of a real experience. The Klosterman twist is that while “reading about Animal Collective on the Internet has replaced being alive,” he’s generally okay with this cultural and social development. I should add that he admits that the Unabomber’s Manifesto and its author had several really good and scarily prescient points.

In his second interview with /Film, many of Eating the Dinosaur‘s ideas are discussed within the context of modern television series like Mad Men and 30 Rock. We also discuss the significance of the odd documentary-style used on The Office and now Modern Family, and why he believes pop-culture writing/blogging on the internet unfortunately has become “an institutional voice” that rivals academia. Is this where I type, “Hopefully the next trailer is better?” For our first interview round with Chuck Klosterman, click here.  For Klosterman’s updates on film adaptations of his books Fargo Rock City and Killing Yourself to Live, click here.

Hunter Stephenson: What’s your biggest problem with 30 Rock?

Chuck Klosterman: [pause] Does it seem like I have one?

Read More »

chuck klosterman interview

Any pop culture writer today worth a scan online has a unique opinion on Chuck Klosterman. The renown American author and journalist made a name for himself in the aughts with witty, hyper-informed contributions as a former senior writer and columnist at SPIN. In 2003, he released a bestselling book of essays about “low culture” under the title, Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs, that dissected, exploded, and—in the case of Saved By the Bell—meta-ized topics ranging from internet porn to why there’s only “one important question a culturally significant film can still ask: What is reality?” To readers with an eye on the future, Klosterman signaled not only the arrival of an adored critic amongst hipsters, TV junkies, and geeks; he was the aware embodiment of the modern intellectual turned as voracious consumer of entertainment. And ever since many a beer has been consumed by writers arguing over or coveting this appointment.

Post-Cocoa Puffs, Klosterman’s bibliography has grown to include several works of non-fiction as well as last year’s Downtown Owl, a well-received debut novel benefiting from word-of-mouth, not unlike how Puffs did (but with Tweets on top). His latest book, Eating the Dinosaur, is a characteristic essay collection that can be burned through in a night but also raises several troubling philosophical questions. In the first part of Klosterman’s interview with /Film, he elaborates on the role feted director Errol Morris played in a few of Dinosaur’s themes. We also discuss his opinion of movie junkets, the accelerated culture of movie blogs, and the film most comparable to Guns N’ RosesChinese Democracy. For the second round of the interview, click here.

Hunter Stephenson: Hi Chuck. So, are you in California to speak about the book?

Chuck Klosterman: I’m doing The Jim Rome Show on ESPN, and it’s in Huntington Beach, California. And I gotta say, it’s creepy as fuck out here man.

Read More »

fargo-rock-city-450x344

Recently, I had the pleasure of interviewing author and renown pop culture critic, Chuck Klosterman, for /Film on subjects ranging from whether or not Avatar will be the cinematic equivalent of Chinese Democracy to the abstract theory that our society is unconsciously working for Don Draper. I’ll be posting the results shortly, but for the time being, here is what Klosterman had to say regarding the film adaptations in development of his books Killing Yourself to Live and Fargo Rock City, the latter of which we reported on back in October. Interview excerpt after the jump…

Read More »

finn_fargo_ruprecht

If there’s a writer who is perfect to make more out of a music and Midwest memoir than the original text offers, it might be Craig Finn, singer and lyricist for The Hold Steady. Finn and longtime The Late Show with David Letterman writer Tom Ruprecht have picked up the rights to Fargo Rock City, the coming of age chronicle by music-geek author Chuck Klosterman. Read More »

I would like to think that many of the people that frequent /Film know who Chuck Klosterman is. But truth is, I only found out about him four or five years ago through his pop culture-infused book Sex, Drugs and Cocoa Puffs. Yet I’m guessing most people probably know him as a rock journalist (which probably explains why I hadn’t discovered him sooner). Klosterman’s 2005 novel Killing Yourself to Live: 85% of a True Story has been optioned by Half Shell Entertainment.

The book is actually a very strange choice for a movie adaptation as it focuses of Klosterman’s journey to the death locations of famous rock musicians (Sarah Vowell did the NPR-ish version of this with Assassination Vacation). What started as a feature for SPIN Magazine, grew into a memoir. Its as much about the musicians and the deaths as it is about what Chuck leans about himself and his relationships along the way. I’m sure the movie adaptation will be loosely based on the concept. Chuck tells Variety, “The idea is to do a comedic road movie heavily based in rock ‘n’ roll.” No screenwriter has yet been hired. Klosterman will executive produce. I’ve included the official book description below:

“For 6,557 miles, Chuck Klosterman thought about dying. He drove a rental car from New York to Rhode Island to Georgia to Mississippi to Iowa to Minneapolis to Fargo to Seattle, and he chased death and rock ‘n’ roll all the way. Within the span of twenty-one days, Chuck had three relationships end — one by choice, one by chance, and one by exhaustion. He snorted cocaine in a graveyard. He walked a half-mile through a bean field. A man in Dickinson, North Dakota, explained to him why we have fewer windmills than we used to. He listened to the KISS solo albums and the Rod Stewart box set. At one point, poisonous snakes became involved. The road is hard. From the Chelsea Hotel to the swampland where Lynyrd Skynyrd’s plane went down to the site where Kurt Cobain blew his head off, Chuck explored every brand of rock star demise. He wanted to know why the greatest career move any musician can make is to stop breathing…and what this means for the rest of us.”

You can purchase Killing Yourself to Live: 85% of a True Story in Paperback on Amazon for $11.20.

Cool Posts From Around the Web: