violation trailer

One of the most jarring, intense films to play at TIFF 2020 and Sundance 2021 was the revenge thriller Violation. Sure to divide audiences, the same ambivalence was shared by one of /Film’s staff critic. In his mixed review, Chris Evangelista called Madeleine Sims-Fewer and Dusty Mancinelli’s work “unflinchingly brutal” yet “muddled,” while the “pervasive feeling of dread and horror is pitch-perfect” and that “there’s much here worth fixating on.”

Whether or not you feel the film sticks its landing, it’s clear that Sims-Fewer and Mancinelli are attempting something quite ambitious with their debut feature, anchored in part by Madeleine’s intense, violent portrayal of the central character Miriam on screen. In conversation with the two directors prior to the film’s Midnight Madness premiere, we asked them about the story’s complexity, how they navigated its bleak themes with a supportive cast, and how key questions about how audience expectations and desire for empathy collide with on-screen behaviour may unsettle even the most jaded of genre fans with this unflinching work. 

Violation hits theaters on March 19 and the Shudder streaming service on March 25.

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violation trailer

Shudder has released the first official trailer for Violation ahead of the revenge thriller’s March premiere on the horror streaming service. The feature filmmaking debut of Madeleine Sims-Fewer and Dusty MancinelliViolation is a brutal feminist revenge fable that stars Sims-Fewer as a woman on a country retreat with her sister and their partners, who slowly unravels through the weekend. Watch the Violation trailer below.

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violation review

Rage, betrayal, confusion, and bloodshed are the driving factors of Violation, an unflinchingly brutal, often quite gruesome story of a woman who goes to extreme lengths following a terrible incident. Writer-directors Madeleine Sims-Fewer and Dusty Mancinelli do not shy away from the violence, employing meticulously crafted practical effects to portray a jaw-dropping series of events. But while there’s genuine dreamy-nightmarish artistry on display here, there’s also a scattershot approach that, while intentional, does more harm than good.

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