sundance 2019 awards

Another Sundance Film Festival has come to an end, bringing with it a whole new slate of films that will either be obsessed over for the following year, or consigned to the badlands of VOD. The festival ended with awards going to films such as One Child NationThe Souvenir, the documentary Knock Down the House, and more. See the full list of Sundance 2019 awards below.

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Troop Zero review

From its opening shot that travels from the Big Dipper all the way down to the small town of Wiggly, Georgia in 1977, Troop Zero, a Southern-fried comedy from female co-directors Bert & Bertie, seems to constantly walk the line of being too precocious and cute for its own good. But even though its jokes don’t always land, the film is still a pleasant, largely charming diversion and further proof that Viola Davis can elevate any movie she’s in. Read More »

Native Son review

Native Son is an adaptation of Richard Wright’s 1940 novel, and while I haven’t read that book, first-time director Rashid Johnson arrives on the scene with a smart, impressive debut full of strong work from a young cast.

Ashton Sanders, who played the teenaged version of Chiron in the Oscar-winning Moonlight, transforms into Bigger “Big” Thomas, a young man from Chicago with a love of punk music and a look to match, wearing a shock of green hair and a long black leather jacket with writing scribbled all over it. Big is a rarity for movie characters: someone who completely defies conventional stereotypes (and acknowledges that fact several times in the film) while also feeling like a well-rounded, genuine human with a life that continues when he’s off-camera. Read More »

sundance michael jackson documentary

The Sundance Michael Jackson documentary Leaving Neverland is facing backlash before anyone has even had a chance to see it. A new report reveals fans of the late singer are threatening to protest the screening of the documentary, leading local police to increase staff. The doc is a nearly 4-hour exposé investigating the allegations of sexual abuse levied against the King of Pop during his lifetime.

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most anticipated Sundance movies

This week, three members of the /Film crew are heading to Park City, Utah for the 2019 Sundance Film Festival. We’ll have reviews and reactions galore from the year’s first major film festival, a place where major movies debut, hidden gems are discovered, and the basic shape of the entire year in film begins to take form. If this Sundance is like every other Sundance, we will see some of the best movies of 2019 and discover some incredible new talent over the next week. It’s our job to put them on your radar.

The festival officially kicks off on Thursday. Before it gets underway, we’re writing about our 12 most anticipated 2019 Sundance movies, the films that we have high hopes for and are going out of our way to make sure we see, no matter what. Here they are, in no particular order. Read More »

2019 Sundance Film Festival lineup

As we recover from Thanksgiving and prepare to head into the holiday season, the 2019 Sundance Film Festival is just a few weeks away. /Film will be on the ground in Park City, Utah in January to bring you coverage of all of the biggest and best in the world of independent film, including movies from filmmakers like Dan Gilroy, Mindy Kaling, Scott Z. Burns, and many more. The festival runs from January 24– February 3, 2019.

Below, read about the 10 notable movies we’re looking forward to, and see the full list of what’ll be playing at the festival. Read More »

American Animals review

(This review originally ran during our coverage of the Sundance Film Festival. American Animals is in select theaters today.)

Heist movies are all about setting up the illusion of clockwork precision, but every good heist film features at least one scene where the job goes horribly wrong – and the great ones often dive into the bitter consequences of crossing the line.

In that tradition comes American Animals, a compelling new heist drama from writer/director Bart Layton, the filmmaker behind the impressive 2012 documentary The Imposter. Here he conducts an interesting harmony between fiction and non-fiction, intercutting dramatic scenes featuring his primary cast (Barry Keoghan, Evan Peters, Jared Abrahamson, Blake Jenner) with actual interviews of the real-life thieves they’re playing. The result is a mesmerizing blend of narrative and documentary storytelling that would seem too far-fetched to believe if it was just another run-of-the-mill thriller. Read More »

The Best of the 2018 Sundance Film Festival

Best of Sundance 2018

The 2018 Sundance Film Festival has come to a close, and while the awards have already been handed out from the festival itself, we have our own accolades that we’d like to pass out to some of the best movies from the year’s first major film fest.

Ethan AndertonBen Pearson and Steve Prokopy all chimed in with their picks for their favorite comedy, favorite drama, favorite performances, most pleasant surprise, biggest disappointment and much more. Keep reading to find out our picks for the Best of Sundance 2018. Read More »

I Think We're Alone Now review

Is there anyone better at playing soulfully sad than Peter Dinklage? The Game of Thrones star is front and center in I Think We’re Alone Now, a post-apocalyptic drama in which he plays the last man on Earth who discovers he’s not as alone as he thinks when a young woman (Elle Fanning) enters his life. Characters in similar stories might celebrate this miraculous opportunity for human connection, but Del (Dinklage) resents it – he actually prefers being by himself, even in such extreme circumstances. Like an episode of The Twilight Zone extended to feature length, I Think We’re Alone Now wraps emotional exploration in a high concept premise. And like Rod Serling’s seminal sci-fi anthology series, this movie features a third-act twist – but this one almost torpedoes the entire story. Read More »

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Tyrel review

As a flurry of white snowflakes fall on a pitch-black sky, the word TYREL is superimposed over them in bold black font. It’s writer/director Sebastian Silva’s first attempt of many to underline the differences between this film’s black protagonist, played by Jason Mitchell (Mudbound, Straight Outta Compton), and the group of all-white bros he’s staying with during a weekend trip to the Catskills to celebrate one of their birthdays. The thing is, Mitchell’s character’s name isn’t even Tyrel, it’s Tyler – the title comes from a misunderstanding from one of the white guys, just one of the endless micro-aggressions (and physical aggressions) Tyler endures during this trip. But while Silva’s exploration of cultural isolation sounds like it could be the heir apparent to last year’s Get Out, Silva doesn’t do enough with the premise to give this movie the same lasting impact. Read More »