facebook spoilers

Soon, you’ll be able to mute more than just your uncle’s bad political opinions. Facebook has begun testing out an algorithm that will allow the social media giant to protect you from spoilers.

The website is rolling out a new feature for a small percentage of test users that would allow them to curate their News Feeds based on keywords. Which means you can stop yelling at us about the Avengers: Infinity War ending.

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Facebook spoilers

Update: Turns out Facebook is not actually launching a feature that filters out spoilers…yet. io9 points out that there was a key quote that wasn’t included in Deadline’s original report. Here’s the full paragraph:

“There’s so much you can do when you have content and conversation happening at scale on the same platform…If we did something where there was a twist every episode, we can make it – this isn’t a feature – spoiler prevention – if you haven’t seen episode 5 yet, you’re not going to see your friend’s comment about episode 5. Those are really easy things to do that no one has really done yet. And I think the reason for that is because it’s hard when you have conversation and viewing happening in two separate places. Hopefully we can work to make some of those things that are true value adds for the Facebook viewer and community at large.”

That makes it clear that the company isn’t preparing to give users this ability right now, but it also indicates that the technology is possible for them, and I would not be surprised if they were quietly developing this tech behind closed doors. Our original story can be read below.

You’re working late, and you can’t watch the latest episode of your favorite show as it’s airing. But it’s being recorded on your DVR or TiVo, and you’ll get to it as soon as you get home. You finally clock out after a hard shift, and quickly scroll through your social media feeds to make sure the world didn’t end while you were on the job. All of a sudden –BAM. Right there in the middle of your Facebook news feed, somebody has ruined the episode you haven’t had a chance to see yet by posting a huge spoiler. Great. Just great.

If you’ve ever longed for a solution to this problem (that didn’t involve adopting a strict “no social media until I watch the episode” policy), you may be in luck: Facebook has announced a new feature that will filter spoilers from your news feed. Find out more about the new Facebook spoilers filter below.
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John Boyega Star Wars spoiler

There’s an unspoken rule when TV personalities interview movie stars on live television: it’s bad form for a TV host to drop a spoiler into the middle of a conversation. But that’s exactly what happened when Star Wars: The Last Jedi star John Boyega appeared on This Morning and co-host Holly Willoughby blurted out a pretty significant surprise live on camera and caught the young actor totally off guard. Watch the John Boyega Star Wars spoiler reaction below. (And this should go without saying, but if you haven’t seen the movie yet, don’t keep reading this.)
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Harrison Ford Punched Ryan Gosling - Blade Runner 2049

In the age of Game of Thrones and Reddit, spoiler culture has become a dominating force in the film and TV communities, unleashing hordes of fans who chide outlets for “spoiling” a twist or pushing studios to mandate what their stars can and can’t say to the press.

Warner Bros. has been keeping a particularly tight lid on Blade Runner 2049 spoilers, with one PR firm handing out strict guidelines to critics with a summary of five potential-spoiler talking points to avoid in their reviews. Critics bristled at the studio’s misguided attempt to dictate the specifics of their reviews, and this has launched a heated discussion: What is spoiler culture, and is it dangerous to film?

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guardians of the galaxy 2 spoilers

Welcome to Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, where the anticipation is high and the spoilers don’t matter. That is, according to director James Gunn.

The film is still a week out from its U.S. release, but fans are becoming especially defensive against spoilers, which abound thanks to advance screenings and an early premiere in Europe. But Gunn reassures fans that those plot details — which are unavoidable nowadays thanks to the immediacy of social media — won’t ruin their enjoyment of the movie.

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Google Patents Social Media Spoiler Software

google spoilers software

There are few things more frustrating than the speed with which the Internet posts spoilers. The second a character dies on TV, there are hundreds of online articles about it, and thousands of tweets. If there’s a surprise in a movie? Good luck holding that for the opening. The second something is seen, avoiding the spoiler is like navigating a mine field. Your Twitter, Facebook, and daily conversations all become potential places to be spoiled.

Now, in their continuing bid for world domination, Google has created a software to protect you from that. It learns what shows, books and movies you watch and then will blur out social media spoilers until you are ready to read them. Find out more about the Google spoiler software below. Read More »

People love Kevin Smith because he’s an unabashed movie nerd and we all feel like we could sit down and have an awesome conversation with him. It’s that relatable nature that Smith brings to his new Internet movie review show, Spoilers, which premiered Monday on Hulu. For the rest of the summer, Smith will take fifty people to see a brand new movie on opening weekend and then all have a discussion about it. Mix that with some exclusive interviews and other segments and we have, what Smith hopes, is a weekly ritual for movie fans everywhere.

So how’s the first episode? Check it out below. Read More »

Kevin Smith and film criticism haven’t always had the most friendly relationship. A few years back he lashed out at critics due to the reaction to Cop Out. The battle continued when Red State was released, as the director refused to show it to critics. On the flip side, great reviews certainly assisted in making films like Clerks and Chasing Amy such long lasting hits.

Smith has now found a way to blend his two ideologies with an internet TV show called Spoilers, which premieres June 4 on Hulu. He calls it an “anti-movie review show” where the filmmaker will take a bunch of fans to see ten summer blockbusters on opening day, forgoing the early critic screenings he abhors so much, and then have an in-depth discussion about its merits. “We don’t review movies, we revere movies,” he says.

After the jump, read more about the show and watch a few teaser clips. Read More »

Spoilers Are Good For You, Says Study

In the world of film blogging, spoilers are an everyday battle. When you’re reading, or writing, about movies that won’t be released for months, sometimes years, there’s a thin line between feeding your frenzy but also preserving the final experience. The general consensus is that spoilers are bad and most of us do everything we can to avoid them. We believe that if you know who Kaiser Soze is, The Usual Suspects won’t be as good. If you know Tyler Durden’s identity, Fight Club is ruined. Or if you know Batman fights Bane on the steps of City Hall in The Dark Knight Rises, somehow, that knowledge will take away from your enjoyment of the movie when you finally see it.

Not so, says a new study. In fact, UC San Diego psychology researchers say that spoilers actually make audiences enjoy a story more. Spoilers are good for you. We’ll explain after the jump. Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

How Should Critics Handle TV Spoilers?

A few days ago, Brian Moylan over at Gawker wrote up a manifesto for spoiler alerts. I’d tell you to go read it, except Moylan straight up spoils plot elements from Treme, Game of Thrones, and Lost with no warning whatsoever. To quote my colleague Matt Singer, if you spoil things in your article about the rules of spoilers, maybe you’re not really an authority on spoilers.
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