the irishman cgi

The Irishman is Martin Scorsese‘s reunion with Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci and Harvey Keitel. It’s also his return to the crime movie genre. But despite all these familiar elements, the upcoming Netflix film is going to be unlike anything Scorsese has ever made before. Because unlike the filmmaker’s previous films, The Irishman is employing extensive CGI in order to de-age the cast. The story spans decades, and rather than cast younger actors for earlier scenes, Scorsese is using special effects to give De Niro and company a youthful appearance. We’ve yet to see any footage of The Irishman, and it sounds like there’s a good reason for that: Scorsese is obsessing over getting it right.

Read More »

The Souvenir trailer

A relationship is pushed to the limits in Joanna Hogg‘s fascinating drama The SouvenirHonor Swinton Byrne (daughter of Tilda Swinton) turns in a revelatory performance as a film student dealing with her unreliable boyfriend (Tom Burke) in the 1980s. This was one of the best films I saw at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, but it’s also a film that’s not going to be for everyone. Watch The Souvenir trailer below.

Read More »

The Souvenir review

Almost all narrative films follow the same structure. A clear beginning, middle and end. A main storyline involving main characters. A problem or situation that must be worked out or resolved. There are very few deviations of this format, for two distinct reasons. One is that we’re accustomed to it – it’s all we’ve ever known. The other is that it works – if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

So when a movie comes along that bucks the trend, shrugs off the norm, and unfolds in a different way, it can be quite jarring. Such is the case with Joanna Hogg’s transcendent The Souvenir. Hogg ignores a traditional narrative approach for a series of vignettes that make up a bigger picture. It works wonderfully – if you stick with it. But you need to prepare yourself for the long-haul.

Read More »

 

Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: What better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? This week we try and grow a beard, get weirded out in a strange house, consider whether something was afoot when Kurt Cobain “allegedly” shot himself, get all modern up in here, take in the freaks in the NYC, and get our twerk on.
Read More »

Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: I celebrate all levels of trailers and hopefully this column will satisfactorily give you a baseline of what beta wave I’m operating on, because what better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? Some of the best authors will tell you that writing a short story is a lot harder than writing a long one, that you have to weigh every sentence. What better medium to see how this theory plays itself out beyond that than with movie trailers?

Read More »