What is Page 2? Page 2 is a compilation of stories and news tidbits, which for whatever reason, didn’t make the front page of /Film. After the jump we’ve included 30 different items, fun images, videos, casting tidbits, articles of interest and more. It’s like a mystery grab bag of movie web related goodness. If you have any interesting items that we might’ve missed that you think should go in /Film’s Page 2 – email us!

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green-zoneIn this week’s episode of the /Filmcast, David Chen, Devindra Hardawar, and Adam Quigley reflect on the winners and the pageantry of this year’s Oscars, and discuss the future of the Superman, Captain America, and Batman franchises. Special guest Jeff Goldsmith joins us from Creative Screenwriting Magazine.

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Actor Corey Haim Dies at 38

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KTLA and TMZ are reporting that actor Corey Haim has died at the age of 38 of an apparent accidental overdose. Haim was found unresponsive in an Oakwood apartment last night. According to TMZ, Haim had been in and out of rehab over a dozen times, but had recently cleaned up.

Haim achieved fame during the 1980s for appearing in several well-known films, including Firstborn, Watchers, and The Lost Boys. More recently, Haim could be seen on screen in The Lost Boys sequel and in Crank: High Voltage. Haim also appeared in the A&E reality show The Two Coreys, with his Lost Boys co-star Corey Feldman.

You can visit Haim’s filmography here. /Film’s Hunter Stephenson has also written about Haim extensively; here’s an interview and an essay by him. Feel free to leave remembrances in the comments below.

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Let’s throw a wrench into this Lost Boys assembly line, shall we? Filming on the second sequel, Lost Boys: The Thirst, is set to begin in early November (in Capetown, South Africa, no less) with Corey Feldman reprising his role as the moody vampire slayer, Edgar Frog. If you managed to fall into a sewer over the last year, the Crack Fox no doubt introduced you to Lost Boys: The Tribe, the worst vampire film to feature “extreme” skateboard stunts and tribal tatts in history. Death by direct-to-DVD. But wait! Based on the plot of Lost Boys 3, which contains a sparkly nod to Twilight, the next installment sounds even worse…

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The clock is ticking. In minutes, I am scheduled to interview Corey Haim. But I need more time to: find my good sunglasses, make a margarita, and hook up my interview shit poolside at a friend’s house. The publicist agrees to push the interview back half-an-hour. The power of /Film. By-and-by, it all works out and the publicist fulfills a dream. I’m not into doing interviews. Much too often, there is A) a bitchy studio hawk circling, B) a wait-time worthy of a disappointing rap concert/Comcast, or C) the celeb is so glazed-over from blurting the same answers to ‘net middle men on every continent that you feel like hugging them, and then slapping them. And likewise for them, sans the personal contact.

But Corey Haim is Z) reached levels of non-ironic cool that even Steve McQueen (not the Hunger one) and Lee Marvin (the Prime Cut one) could never touch. Like brightly-dyed shorts with displaced geometric patterns, Haim burst onto the scene as the American teenager in the 1980s. For an actor—and for our younger readers—that requires more natural pep than LeBron James has hops. And in my opinion, Haim was the first real, believable and awesome geek on screen (dude, your comic store’s Dewey Decimal System blows) who could get laid. And thus, maybe get you laid. Paul Rudd would come much later. Paul Rudd is also a geek narc. Haim can be seen in theaters this weekend wearing a mullet in Crank: High Voltage.

Excluding the initial actions above, I didn’t prepare for the interview; I know I’ll be interviewing Corey again soon when he gets a major theatrical role. It needs to happen, Hollywood. Our chat was fun, casual, whatever. Haim has the laid back charm over the tele that many of us know so well. Just add a cigarette.

/Film: Hello Corey Haim.

Corey Haim: What’s up Hunter. How you doin’?

Ha. I’m doing fine, sittin’ by the pool. So you have a role in Crank 2. How did you first meet [writer/directors Mark] Neveldine and [Brian] Taylor?

Corey Haim: Actually, a while ago man. I believe. See, I was supposed to be in the first movie. Was it the same character? A character. I just know that in this movie they wanted me to play this character. Randy.

Right.

Corey Haim: Let me give you a description of my character.

Sure.

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BloodyDisgusting has learned that Fearless scribe Evan Charnov is writing the screenplay for Warner Direct’s direct-to-dvd threequel, The Lost Boys 3. Corey Feldman has signed on to return to reprise his role as Edgar Frog, vampire hunter. Moviehole is reporting that Jamison Newlander has signed on to reprise his role as Alan Frog from the original 1987 film. Newlander filmed a sequence for the 2008 direct-to-dvd sequel, but his scene ended up on the cutting room floor. Lost Boys 2: The Tribe ended with a set-up teasing a possible battle between Edgar Frog and Sam Emerson (Corey Haim), but as of fight now, Haim isn’t expected to return for the third film.

Movie Review: Lost Boys 2: The Tribe

If Warner Bros asked us for a pull quote for the DVD to Lost Boys: The Tribe, it would say, “Corey Feldman can’t be felled, man. -/Film.” The most prominent Corey, in this sequel and IRL, manages to endearingly synopsize and upstage this laughable production in a single scene. Feldman cracks open a raw egg into a glass, a la Rocky Balboa, filled with garlic and holy water and swallows it. Then he wipes his mouth and the camera lingers on his face, this still youthful lake of resilience, resourcefulness and 1980s radicalness. Feldman’s character, Edgar Frog, labels his novelty cocktail “Frog Juice,” but in my sore eyes, Feldman just took one for the team. This sequel is an all-out war for Corey’s soul, and the souls of all Eighties Babies.

Not only is Feldman stuffed far in the background on the DVD’s terrible box art—he’s trapped under the bodies of OC star Autumn Reeser, Kiefer Sutherland’s half-brother and Stifler’s lil’ bro—but if you move the box ever so slightly, he’s wiped out by a fucking hologram! The film itself is a similar travesty. Feldman is barely in it. Replace the plebe-luring hologram with the most atrocious half-vampire-on-skateboard climax imaginable. This “highly complex” action centerpiece plays as if one of the Lost Boys from Steven Spielberg’s Hook gave a slo-mo pill to Gleaming the Cube‘s Christian Slater and together they made a subpar contribution for YouTube. On the special features, the producers (going to hell, for sure)  boast that the film gets at the core of “real extreme sports” in 2008. One of them excitedly says, “these vampires ride bikes, they skate, they skateboard!” But none of the countless vampbrahs here rollerskate. The producer is a fucking liar. And then there’s director P.J. Pesce. This visionary/hack chomps on a cigar with an elated, nutty look on his face. Watch your back, Patton.

And how about the hilarious scene in which a Dianne Wiest-knockoff holds up a DVD of The Goonies and makes a “hip fuss” about it to the kids for a few minutes? Okay. So, rather than allot more time to a stoked Corey Feldman stabbing bloodsuckers (ones that resemble rejects from Sega Genesis’s Altered Beast, but whatevs), I’m watching a Jason Patric-knockoff (a first?) named Tad Hilgenbrinck eyeball an old Feldman flick as I stopwatch his face for a nervous twitch to register as poor acting ability? Later, as Hilgenbrinck and Feldman drive to an underground lair and Feldman explains the workings of a garlic bola, Hilgenbrinck looks higher than Saul Silver’s kite. Feldman finally gives up on the guy and stares down in defeat at his wooden, carbon and metal stakes. Something tells me this was improvised.

After more than 20 years, it’s really cool that the filmmakers called up Jamison Newlander to reprise his role as Alan Frog. Too bad he was cut from the film. LoL. I suspect he was called (his involvement was well  publicized) just to get fans interested. But it makes complete sense that Corey Haim wouldn’t show up until after the end credits, after we’ve observed Feldman endure this softcore Cinemax/X-Games raping of their horror comedy classic. I imagine Haim utilized his patented Corey Haim Logic to voluntarily choose this post-credits shortcut—as an allegory, it’s the VH1 equivalent of the tortoise and the hare. Not only is the lone scene between the Coreys—which feels like a one-take deal at that—the best scene in the movie, it’s more satisfying than Freddy vs Jason (which was pretty good). Maybe this is due to Corey Feldman and Corey Haim surviving horrors together in real life (and reality TV). Maybe it’s because, in their lone scene, Feldman sounds like Christian Bale’s Dark Knight and Haim, Heath Ledger’s Joker. Maybe it’s because the DVD contains two more amazing alternate “they’re back!” endings. Maybe it’s because Coreys never say die.

3/10 (yes, the 3 is for the Coreys’ Lost Boys 3 aka Lost Boys 2: No Skateboards)

Discuss: What did you think of Lost Boys: The Tribe. Should a third film be made focusing on the original crew?

Interview: Corey Feldman on Lost Boys 2

At Comic Con, /Film’s Adam Quigley got the chance to sit down one on one with Corey Feldman and talk about the release of The Lost Boys 2: The Tribe.

/Film:
So, what was it like for you to go back to this world a few years later?

Corey Feldman: Well, it was fun and scary at the same time. Obviously when you’re doing something like this, you don’t want to disregard the fan’s perception of what the original was supposed to be, and it’s very important that you kind of work it up from the highest level of authenticity when you’re creating a character like this, so it was challenging at the same time. I like to do something that’s a challenge for me as an actor. Being in business as long as I have, you want to make sure that you’re constantly challenging yourself and setting obstacles and I think this certainly was one of those going back to the character and making his evolve but yet not evolve was the trick, and I think that you’ll see that in the film. I mean there are certain things that have grown in his character but for the most part he’s exactly as we left him 21 years ago.
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