Ken Taylor Mondo Show

Few artists in the poster world are as in demand as Ken Taylor. The Australian artist is not only one of the most popular names on the Mondo roster, he does posters for many of the biggest bands touring today. Taylor’s gorgeous, realistic, striking style has made instant collectibles of posters for Halloween, Alice in Wonderland, Man of Steel, Jurassic Park, and Breaking BadNow he’s tackling even more.

Though Taylor had a paired show at Mondo last year, and triple at Phone Booth the year before that, on May 30, he’s soon having his first solo show at the Mondo Gallery in Austin, Texas. The show, simply called The Art of Ken Taylor, will feature posters for lots of recognizable films, many of which Mondo has never tackled before.

To whet your whistle, we’re excited to exclusively debut Taylor’s poster for Alfonso Cuaron‘s Children of Men and also a take on Frank Oz‘s musical, Little Shop of Horrors. Read more about the solo Ken Taylor Mondo show below. Read More »

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Alfonso Cuaron shooting Children of Men

Most people think Comic-Con is nothing more than a house of madness where people sleep for hours to see 30 seconds of brand new exclusive footage. Granted, that aspect of the Con is a big thing. But there are also moments of quiet genius stuffed in between the big events. One such moment took place during Entertainment Weekly‘s Visionaries panel, which featured directors Alfonso Cuaron, Marc Webb and Edgar Wright talking about their films, new and old.

At one point, Wright asked Cuaron about the infamous moment in his 2006 film Children of Men when blood splattered on the lens during an incredibly complex long take. Cuaron told the story of how it happened, how he tried to stop it, and why it stayed in there. Now you can watch the director explain this piece of modern film history. Read More »

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This week, Dave, Devindra, and Adam discuss the promising film career of Seth MacFarlane, wonder at the messed up nature of Elfen Lied, mourn the loss of a talented director, and lament the state of 3D Blu-Rays. Special guest Joanna Robinson joins us from Pajiba.

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. We’ll be reviewing The Amazing Spider-Man next week.

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What is Page 2? Page 2 is a compilation of stories and news tidbits, which for whatever reason, didn’t make the front page of /Film. After the jump we’ve included 40 different items, fun images, videos, casting tidbits, articles of interest and more. It’s like a mystery grab bag of movie web related goodness. If you have any interesting items that we might’ve missed that you think should go in /Film’s Page 2 – email us!

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children_of_menThe /Filmcast: After Dark is a recording of what happens right after The /Filmcast is over, when the kids have gone to bed and the guys feel free to speak whatever is on their minds. In other words, it’s the leftover and disorganized ramblings, mindfarts, and brain diarrhea from The /Filmcast, all in one convenient audio file. In this episode, Dave Chen, Devindra Hardawar, and Adam Quigley talk about the role of imagined worlds in some of their favorite films. Also, film critic Mike D’Angelo joins us to discuss his article decrying the use of long continuous shots in Children of Men, and to assess Anne Thompson’s claim that film criticism is a dying art.

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Join us next Monday at 9 PM EST / 6 PM PST at Slashfilm’s live page as we review Wes Anderson’s Fantastic Mr. Fox.

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where the wild things are posterIn this week’s /Filmcast, Dave Chen, Devindra Hardawar and Adam Quigley praise The Inside Man, wonder why America can’t handle miniseries, celebrate the joys of Glee, and explain the similarities between Where the Wild Things Are and Children of Men. Special guest Stephen Tobolowsky joins us for this episode. You can currently see Stephen on Glee, which airs on FOX, Wednesdays at 9 PM EST.

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Join us next Monday at 9 PM EST / 6 PM PST at Slashfilm’s live page as we review Lars von Trier’s Antichrist.

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Cool Stuff: Futuristic Movie Timeline

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Dan Meth has created a movie timeline for futuristic movies, proving that the future presented in sci-fi classics are rooted in alternatie parrellel universes. Check out the full timeline after the jump.

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Editor’s Note: After Turner Classic Movies released their list of the 15 Most Influential Classic Movies, some people were complaining that no films were included from the last 32 years. I joked on Twitter that I would like to see a list of the ten most influential films of the last ten years, and Brendon jumped at the opportunity to create such a list. The idea is to predict what ten films from this decade would be looked at as influential in 20 years. The task is ridiculous, because its hard to predict the long term effects of the films that were released in the last decade (especially ones released in the last couple years), but Brendon did a pretty good job. It should be noted that Brendon’s list is more skewed towards advances in filmmaking and storytelling which influenced and changed the future of cinema, rather than movies that influenced the culture.

influential

Are these the ten most influential films of the last ten years? I think they might just be. Disappointingly, I really don’t like four of them. I’ve also cheated and only included English language films.

The full list will come after the break, and then after that will come the comments section for your contributions.

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