Hollywood Reporter actress

The Golden Globes were last night, but the Awards season is far from over, as the Oscars and more events are still to come. Generally one of the few joys of all this awards coverage are The Hollywood Reporter roundtables, which puts some of the most talked about actors, writers, directors, and more artists in a room together for an hour. This year’s actress roundtable features Carey Mulligan (Suffragette), Jennifer Lawrence (Joy), Cate Blanchett (Carol), Jane Fonda (Youth), Brie Larson (Room), Helen Mirren (Woman in Gold), Charlotte Rampling (45 Years), and Kate Winslet (Steve Jobs).

Watch The Hollywood Reporter actress roundtable after the jump.

I’m finishing up watching this roundtable now, and I think it’s fair to say Golden Globe winner Kate Winslet is the MVP of the conversation, discussing acting with honesty and self-awareness. On the subject of being paid less than male co-stars, Winslet had this to say:

The British thing in me, on a red carpet when a journalist is there with a mic in your face, is you just go, ‘I don’t want to talk about money!’ It’s money. It’s absolutely the money thing [for why I don’t want to talk about it]. It literally is that question, truly. It’s really hard. At a roundtable like this a few weeks ago, a journalist full on said to me: ‘do you know if you got paid less than Michael Fassbender?’ I never want to be asked that question, and I never want to have to answer it. That side of it I do find vulgar, because it lifts the lid, and suddenly journalists are asking questions that are really uncomfortable answering. It is a British thing, you know, because we are taught to not talk about money with your friends, let alone publicly.

Winslet also, being the badass that she is, doesn’t agree on using the word “brave,” regarding an earlier performance of hers. Here’s the full video roundtable:

This roundtable raises one pivotal question: who dares interrupt Dame Hellen Mirren? Host Stephen Galloway often interrupts The Hollywood Reporter’s guests in these roundtables, so it’s always expected, but there are far too many instances of him breaking up an engaging conversation to get to the next question — which you should never do in an interview, even if time is short. Plus, when you have actors of this caliber in a room together, why not let them carry the conversation sometimes? You know they’re going to go in an interesting direction, so why not let them? Nonetheless, it’s an entertaining, informative conversation.

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