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Netflix is getting into the movie-making business. The streaming service announced this week that it would team with Weinstein Co. to give a day-and-date release to Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: The Green Legend, the sequel to Ang Lee‘s 2000 film. The movie will hit Netflix and IMAX simultaneously in summer 2015.

Fight choreographer Yuen Woo-Ping is directing this one, with Michelle Yeoh reprising her role as Yu Shu-Lien. Donnie Yen joins the cast as Silent Wolf. Hit the jump for all the details on the Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon sequel Netflix / IMAX release. Plus, get a look at the first Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon sequel photos.

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Keanu Reeves has been in a couple of big martial arts influenced movies (those Matrix films come to mind, and there’s the delayed 47 Ronin) and now he’s directing his own. The film is called Man of Tai Chi, and features Reeves as the villain, with Tiger Hu Chen (who worked in the Matrix stunt team) as the hero. The movie also features Karen Mok (So Close), Simon Yam (Ip Man 1 & 2) and Iko Uwais (The Raid), with the rather famous and very skilled Yuen Woo Ping (The MatrixCrouching Tiger Hidden Dragon) as the action director.

Man of Tai Chi will make its debut later this year, but in the meantime we’ve got the first images and a teaser poster.  Read More »

A dozen years after the release of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, The Weinstein Co. is getting ready to make a sequel. Though it’s been a while since we heard about any potential follow-up to Ang Lee‘s international hit, it looks like the Weinsteins have quietly been making preparations behind the scenes. Production is on track to begin in May, with a script by John Fusco (The Forbidden Kingdom). Ronny Yu (Fearless) is in talks to direct. More details after the jump.

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A new trailer has just been released for True Legend, an upcoming film by influential director and fight choreographer Yuen Woo-ping. Yuen made his name as a director back in the ’70s with movies like Drunken Master, but has recently focused more on action choreography, for films including The Matrix, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Kill Bill and Kung Fu Hustle. True Legend is his first directorial effort since 1996. As you might guess, it is a martial arts actioner.

Vincent Zhao (Once Upon a Time in China), Zhou Xun, Jay Chou (Kato from The Green Hornet), Michelle Yeoh and David Carradine all star. Watch the trailer after the jump.

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It’s a good day for great news. First Criterion makes an incredible deal with Hulu Plus. And now Megan Ellison, the heiress who recently came to the rescue of two Paul Thomas Anderson films (The Master and Inherent Vice) is making a deal to buy North American rights to Wong Kar Wai‘s new film, The Grandmasters. Read More »

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With US audiences at least, Yuen Woo Ping is probably the best known and most popular of Chinese martial arts movie choreographers. His work on American pictures like Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and The Matrix helped cement his cult status, though it’s probably fair to say much of his best work is found in his Chinese and Hong Kong productions like Fist of Legend and Iron Monkey.

After a break of fourteen years since his last big screen outing as a director, as opposed to just action director, stunt co-ordinator or choreographer, Yuen is now completing True Legend. As you’d see from the trailer – embedded after the break – it’s another telling of the story of Beggar Su, the legendary character described in the official synopsis thus:

A wealthy man living during the Qing Dynasty  loses his fortune and reputation as a result of a conspiracy against him. After being forced out onto the streets, Su dedicates his life to martial arts and reemerges as a patriotic hero known as the King of Beggars.

This is Yuen’s third Beggar Su film after Drunken Master, one of Jackie Chan’s masterpieces and a perennial favourite round at my place, and Heroes Among Heroes which saw Donnie Yen in the role.

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Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: I celebrate all levels of trailers and hopefully this column will satisfactorily give you a baseline of what beta wave I’m operating on, because what better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? Some of the best authors will tell you that writing a short story is a lot harder than writing a long one, that you have to weigh every sentence. What better medium to see how this theory plays itself out beyond that than with movie trailers?

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