Possible First Look: Yogi Bear

removed at request from WB

/Film reader Dave BC sent over a link to some photos which claim to be from the hybrid live-action/computer animated feature adaptation Yogi Bear. I’m unable to verify if these are real or not, but they sure look like it. If you know anything, shoot me an email or comment below. They also look very faithful to the originally Hanna-Barbera creations.

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Two weeks of reshoots and/or additional shooting will take place for Jonah Hex at the beginning of the year, and a set of casting call notes has gone out describing the characters involved. There are a few significant ones: Jeb Turnbull, son of John Malkovich‘s primary villain, and Cassie, Hex’s wife. Casting these characters implies that a couple of sequences will be shot that are flashbacks to Hex’s past.

Cassie is mentioned but not seen in earlier drafts of the script. One draft I read had an extensive flashback featuring Jeb Turnbull, with a couple of big scenes, so the quick either/or supposition is that either that sequence wasn’t shot, or was extensively changed at the time and is now being reworked again. The former seems more likely. President Andrew Johnson is also being cast. That flashback was set in 1862, too early for him to be President (he took office in 1865) so there could be more than just the flashback to shoot. Also, I’m not sure how many drafts of Hex exist after the one I read, so don’t think any of this is set in stone. [SpoilerTV]

After the break, news on Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston’s romcom, Social Network, and some extra Yogi Bear news. Read More »

Yogi Bear Finds His Ranger Smith: Tom Carvanagh

yogi bear cast

Last month when I posted the last casting update for the hybrid live-action/computer animated feature based on the Hanna-Barbera cartoon Yogi Bear, I wondered if Park Ranger Smith would be included in the film, as he had yet to be mentioned. Variety now has word that Tom Carvanagh (Ed) has joined the cast, and will be playing Ranger Smith.

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Most of you probably know T.J. Miller as Hud, the frazzled cameraman/comic relief in Matt Reeves’ Cloverfield. Turns out that since that performance, Miller has been angling for a role in the forthcoming adaptation of Yogi Bear. While cartoon-to-screen adaptations have typically ended up being abominations, this one at least looks like it has a pretty good cast going for it, with Anna Faris, Justin Timberlake, and Dan Aykroyd signing on a few weeks ago.

According to The Apiary, Miller had already been called in to audition twice for the role. Afterwards, as a joke, Miller worked with filmmaker Jordan Vogt-Roberts to create the below audition tape, in which Miller interacts with a real-life bear. The video somehow made its way to Barry Meyer, the chairman of Warner Brothers, resulting in an offer for the part of Ranger Jones. Presumably, Ranger Jones will be a live-action role, while Yogi and Boo-Boo will be computer animated. Hit the jump to see the video.
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yogi bear casting

Entertainment Weekly has learned that Anna Faris, Dan Aykroyd, and Justin Timberlake are in talks to star in the hybrid live-action/computer animated feature based on the Hanna-Barbera cartoon Yogi Bear. The big screen 3D movie is being directed by Eric Brevig (Journey to the Center of the Earth), from a screenplay by Brad Copeland (Wild Hogs).  What characters will Faris, Aykroyd and Timberlake play? Details after the jump.

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Giving heightened meaning to the name Boo Boo, the previously announced Yogi Bear movie—another CG/live-action why-brid—has landed a director, a 3D director at that. Eric Brevig, who was responsible for Brendan Fraser’s Journey to the Center of the Earth 3D and specializes in visual effects, has replaced Ash Brannon, the co-director of Toy Story 2 and HDIC on Surf’s Up. The “modern update” of the Hanna-Barbera character/thief will be scribed by writing team Jeffrey Ventimilia and Joshua Sternin (That ’70s Show, Duckman). The project is being compared—favorably—to Alvin and the Chipmunks, the widely-successful family movie better known as an inevitable highlight in David Cross’s suicide note.

Much of the charm in watching Yogi Bear was due to his antics being as predictable and witty as Jason Voorhees’s. With a smaller facsimile, Boo Boo, at his waist, Yogi stole countless picnic baskets from human campers in the fictional Jellystone Park, to the frustration of the anal-retentive, overworked-father-like Ranger Smith. Set within the stoney confines of Hanna-Barbera’s econo-animation, a viewer could investigate the marshmellows in a bowl of cereal for a few minutes, look back up, and still be on the same page. Something about being forced to pay attention to Yogi Bear running from real humans, and probably having to endure a 3D break dance/farting sesh, is torturous to me. You?

via Vulture

Yogi Bear Hybrid Movie

When we look back at history, Scooby Doo and Alvin and the Chipmunks will be blamed for creating a whole new genre of horrible family films. Warner Bros is developing a live-action/animated hybrid big screen adaptation of the classic Hanna-Barbera cartoon Yogi Bear. Surf’s Up co-writer/director Ash Brannon has signed on to direct the project, which will be scripted by Tooth Fairy/Surviving Christmas scribes Joshua Sternin and Jeffrey Ventimilia. Like Chipmunks, the entire film will be shot live-action, with exception of Yogi, Boo-boo and the other creature characters will be computer animated.

The character made his debut in 1958 as a supporting character on The Huckleberry Hound Show. In 1961, he was given his own television show, The Yogi Bear Show, which followed the adventures of Yogi in Jellystone Park. Yogi used a catch phrase “I’m smarter than the average bear!”, and would often steal picnic baskets from campers, which would anger Park Ranger Smith. The character also wears a hat, and sports a collar and tie. Interesting bit of trivia: According to the BBC, this was a common trick that Hanna-Barbera use to use that would allow them to to redraw just the head and keep the body static, which reduced the number of drawings needed for a seven-minute cartoon from 14,000 to around 2,000.

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