Simpsons Take The Bowl

Even the creators of The Simpsons know we love the old stuff. Specifically, the first 10 to 12 seasons. That’s the period in which Matt Groening‘s iconic yellow family took the world by storm and became a television institution. Since then many fans have fallen off the show, citing a decline in quality, and maybe that decline is a fact. But The Simpsons endures. This year is the 25th anniversary of the show, making it the longest-running sitcom in U.S. history.

To celebrate the anniversary, The Simpsons took over legendary Los Angeles concert venue The Hollywood Bowl for a three night concert event called The Simpsons Take the Bowl. Hosted by Hank Azaria (the voice of Moe, Ape, Chief Wiggum and many others), the event featured a slew of guest stars performing songs and score from The Simpsons, with a strong focus on the early years. Mainly, songs from the 1997 album Songs in the Key of Springfield, including The Monorail Song, Who Needs the Kwik-E-Mart, The Stonecutters Song, Happy Birthday Lisa and others. This being Hollywood, there were some references to The Simpsons Movie, too, and Hans Zimmer live-conducting the score to the Oscar-nominated short, The Longest Daycare.

Basically, if you loved The Simpsons as a child or adult, it was a simply fantastic evening of entertainment. And, if you couldn’t be there, several of the numbers from the evening have been uploaded online. Check them out below. Read More »

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Cool Stuff: Rich Kelley’s UHF Poster

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Earlier this month, the Alamo Drafthouse held two sold out screenings of UHF at the huge Paramount Theater with Director Jay Levey and Weird Al Yankovic in attendance. To commemorate the event, MondoTees worked with Jay and Al and come up with a special limited edition poster.

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