the lost boys

(Welcome to The Best Movies You’ve Never Seen, a series that takes a look at slightly more obscure, under-the-radar, or simply under-appreciated movies. In this edition: the best vampire movies you’ve probably never seen!)

Vampires are one of the horror genre’s more bland and uninspired character types, but even as I believe that to be true, I also find myself to be a big fan of dozens of vampire films. I promise this is less about me being a hypocrite than it is a response to the abundance of lazy filmmakers out there, as the movies that stand apart from the pack for one reason or another entertain by being different (or simply better) than the norm. Some deliver the goods with a smart script and loads of personality while others simply find fresh ways to tell a vampire story… even if that means chucking the fangs, bats, and magic eyes right out the window.

This month sees the anniversary of two such standouts – it’s the 25th anniversary of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and the 30th for The Lost Boys – so I wanted to take a look at some other good to great vampire movies that deserve a bit more attention. Great titles like The Lair of the White Worm, A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, Lifeforce, Vampire’s Kiss, Near Dark, and Cronos have been covered enough by this point, all well-deserved, but here are seven more that you probably haven’t seen that are still worth the effort of seeking out.

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Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: I celebrate all levels of trailers and hopefully this column will satisfactorily give you a baseline of what beta wave I’m operating on, because what better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? Some of the best authors will tell you that writing a short story is a lot harder than writing a long one, that you have to weigh every sentence. What better medium to see how this theory plays itself out beyond that than with movie trailers?

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