Cafe Society header image

Rumors had been swirling for awhile that Woody Allen‘s next film, titled Cafe Society, would open the 2016 Cannes Film Festival. Today an official announcement confirmed those rumors, making this the third time Allen has opened the French film festival. Hollywood Ending and Midnight in Paris had the honor in 2002 and 2011 respectively.

Cafe Society, starring Kristen Stewart and Jesse Eisenberg, will premiere at the festival on May 11th, and along with this news, we finally have an official logline. In traditional Woody Allen fashion, it doesn’t tell us a whole lot about what we can expect from the romance, but some details were recently revealed by cinemtographer Vittorio Storaro. In addition, a new photo from the movie was revealed that you can see below.

See the Cafe Society photo after the jump along with some new details on the movie. Read More »

woody allen digital

Woody Allen has directed around 50 movies. ManhattanAnnie HallCrimes and Misdemeanors, and even his most recent efforts have all been shot on film. For the first time in his career, the writer/director isn’t shooting on celluloid. Read more about the first Woody Allen digital movie after the jump.

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cinematographer-style-1

Here’s a feature-length documentary on the art of cinematography — one of many such films, but this particular one does feature the participation of dozens of cinematographers. Actually, more than “dozens” — Jon Fauer‘s Cinematographer Style features interviews with over one hundred shooters. They include, but are hardly limited to Roger Deakins, László Kovács, Vittorio Storaro, Gordon Willis, Matthew Libatique, Bill Pope, Newton Thomas Sigel, Dante Spinotti, and John Toll.

A week ago I watched the beginning of the film and was put off — ironically, this film devoted to cinematography is hampered at the beginning by a too-literal and sometimes haphazard edit. But scan forward a bit to where the detailed talk of technique begins, and you’ll find a rich trove of material learned by years of experience on some of the most significant films. For anyone interested in how films are made — and not just how, but why — this is a great feature. Read More »