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For all the hate, garbage and stupidity the Internet brings us on a daily basis, every once in a while it provides a global platform for something awesome. In this case, Jon Negroni‘s Pixar Theory. Negroni wrote a post that has been circulating since last week which goes through every single Pixar movie since Toy Story and surmises they’re all set in the same universe.

So, for example, the theory states Brave sets a precedent for why animals can interact with humans, which explains a lot of Ratatouille, which maybe inspired the characters in Up to invent tech to communicate with their animals, which possibly inspired the beginnings of Buy-N-Large from Wall-E, and so on and so on. It’s obviously much more detailed than that and I totally don’t believe it’s “real,” from Pixar’s perspective, but it’s a fun read that does make some sense.

Below, we’ll link to the original post and even show you a video that details it. Read More »

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Craig Drake - Akira

Every great hero needs a signature mode of transportation. A huge muscle car, a distinctive motorcycle, or maybe a spaceship that looks like a hamburger. Whatever their pleasure, the latest art exhibit by the Hero Complex Gallery has got it covered. The show is called Righteous Rides…And the Dudes Who Drive Them and it will open May 3 in Los Angeles, CA.

Artists have made posters and paintings based on the “righteous rides” in films such as Flight of the Navigator, Akira, Star Wars, My Neighbor Totoro, Skyfall, Bullitt, Up, Spaceballs, District 9, Easy Rider, the Dukes of Hazzard and so much more. Check out a small sample of the show below. Read More »

Jonathan Trappe has a simple goal: fly across the Atlantic. Something that happens dozens of times per day by multiple airlines might not seem like a big deal, but Trappe wants to do it alone and in a boat lifted only by balloons. He’s a professional Cluster Balloonist, similar to Carl Fredricksen in Pixar’s Up. Recently, just for fun, Trappe duplicated Carl’s feat by taking a small house up in the air tethered only by balloons. That might sound impressive, but his previous trips across the English Channel and the Alps are slightly better.

After the jump, read more about his feats, see videos and photos of his Up inspired trip. Read More »

Ranking the Best & Worst Pixar Movies

How is it that a movie studio that produces kid’s films can be responsible for so many of the best films in cinema?

Twenty years ago, that question would be directed at Disney. Now it’s more likely to refer to Pixar, Studio Ghibli, or even Dreamworks of late. What is it about children’s entertainment that has, time and time again, managed to capture the hearts and minds of adults as much as it has their offspring?

Perhaps it’s a result of these films rekindling our lost sense of childlike wonder and naively adventurous spirit. Perhaps it’s their universally accessible narrative simplicity, always ready to charm away our worries with the awe-inspiring visual splendor through which these tales are so often told.

Whatever the case may be, with thirteen films under their belt, the Pixar formula is one that’s proven itself to leave a lasting impression, transporting us to spectacular, gorgeously rendered and thoughtfully defined worlds — second only to the passionately heartfelt and funny stories of family and friendship embedded within.

What’s more, Pixar is able to achieve this mixture while emboldening children to think for themselves; to challenge the status quo; to recognize their true potential, as well as their limitations. As fun and charming and pretty as Pixar’s films are, it’s the complex ideas and emotions they explore that makes them truly special, affording youths the opportunity to confront the realities of the world around them in a way they can understand and cope with. While everyone else is content to pander to kids, Pixar knows that the best way to communicate with children is to treat them as equals.

But equality is not a trait shared by the current roster of Pixar films. Despite the technical virtuosity on full display with every production, it takes a lot more than stunning animation to make a film great, and that’s not a balance that Pixar always strikes — at least not recently. At one point it may have seemed like the studio could do no wrong, but that was a short-lived romantic notion, and hardly one that merits much deliberation. No, far more instructive would be to scrutinize their missteps in conjunction with their successes, and try to determine what exactly it is that makes any one of their works richer than the other. After all, what better way to understand what makes a story great than to study the best? Read More »

Even as we dive into the heart of the summer movie season, some of the most promising imminent releases could be titles that aren’t new at all. Pixar is re-releasing four of its recent hits — Toy Story 3, Ratatouille, Up, and Wall-E — into AMC theaters for four days over Memorial Day weekend, from May 25 through May 28. The films will be be up against the horror Chernobyl Diaries and the sci-fi sequel Men in Black 3. Yeah, given those options, I may just opt to revisit one of the Pixar classics too.

Especially since tickets will be going for as low as $6 each. Considering that regular screenings generally cost twice that in my area, that’s quite the bargain. Further sweetening the deal, each screening will also include a classic Pixar short and a behind-the-scenes sneak peek at Pixar’s next project, Brave. Head to the AMC website for more info on locations, pricing, and showtimes.

And speaking of Brave, hit the jump for details on its world premiere, which will coincide with the debut of Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre.

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Going to big conventions is a lot of fun until a few days later and you hear what you missed. Recently, this happened at Comic Con when I heard what happened at the Lost panel. Speaking of Lost, that show’s composer, Michael Giacchino, apparently had an amazing panel at the D23 Expo. Which we missed. Giacchino’s panel, The Music of Pixar, unfortunately ran up against Disney’s epic movie panel but, thanks to the magic of YouTube, we can now all watch the Oscar-winning composer talk about his inspiration, and music for, the Pixar films The Incredibles, Ratatouille, Up and Cars 2. We’ve got the full panel embedded after the jump. Read More »

Reading this, you know you’re a film fan. You wouldn’t be on this site if you weren’t. Visiting movie themed websites is just one of many outlets film fans have to feed their passion. Going to the movies is another, writing about them fits too and then there are the select few who go above and beyond and make their own art based on their favorite films.

That’s what /Film reader Mahdi Chowdhury has done and his work is worthy of your time. He’s currently in the process of making some beautiful and thoughtful posters for some of his favorite films like Reservoir Dogs, Apocalypse Now, Leon, Lost in Translation, Taxi Driver and we’ve got a look after the jump. Read More »

VOTD: ‘[the films of] Pixar Animation Studios’

For the past seven months, Kees van Dijkhuizen‘s been releasing tribute videos for his yearlong “[the films of]” project, each showcasing the work of a different director via a montage, and we at /Film have been with him since the beginning. For his newest installment, however, van Dijkhuizen chose to go a slightly different route: Rather than select one auteur to focus on, he’s chosen an entire company. Watch “[the films of] Pixar Animation Studios” after the jump.

Read More »

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