This morning, I traveled to the Paramount Pictures lot to view footage from James Cameron‘s 3D conversion of Titanic. Regular readers probably know that while I’m a 3D advocate, I absolutely hate post converted 3D. Disney has recently proven to me (and many others) that a well done post conversion can look great in the medium of animation. We’ve seen the post conversion process improve over the past two years, but the best post conversion live-action footage still looks like fake cardboard cutouts to my eyes. Even Cameron admitted in his introduction before the screening that post converted 3D is really only “2.99D — It’s not really 3D.”

We screened 18 minutes of footage, which was comprised of clips from throughout the whole movie. We saw slow dramatic scenes, and tense action sequences — a good mix. I cam out of the theater as a believer. This is the best post converted 3D footage I’ve ever seen. Even though the film is 15 years old, the 4K restoration looks incredible, almost like a new movie.

And the 3D looks almost as good as natively shot 3D — actually, if I had never seen the movie before, you would have been able to convince me of such with some of these clips. It may help that Cameron’s cinematography is usually slow and steady and wonderfully composed for depth. It also helps that Cameron spent one year and something close to $20 million to convert the film to 3D. While this is time and money that new releases will never have to post convert, it sets a bar for the 3D re-releases we’re likely to see in the future.

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We’ve known for some time that a 3D re-release of James Cameron‘s Titanic would be hitting theaters, and we had a very good idea that it would be sometime in April 20120. Now the film has a firm release date: April 6, 2012. That date nearly marks the centennial anniversary of the Titanic’s maiden voyage (she actually left Southampton for New York on April 10, 1912) and what better way to honor the passengers who died days later than by turning the sinking of the ship into a 3D moneymaking event? Expect to see some release date shuffling taking place for other films that were already set to hit on that weekend (The Cold Light of Day, American Reunion), and perhaps even for other 3D films that were holding nearby dates, like the Clash of the Titans sequel.

Read some of Paramount and Fox’s very proud press release after the break. (It doesn’t really have any specific new information, however.) Read More »

What’s the best use for post-converted 3D? If you’re James Cameron, the answer is obvious: it should be applied to bring established classic films into the 21st century. The director is planning a 3D conversion of his mega-hit Titanic to be released in 2012, on the centennial anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic. Asked about the conversion he has a few things to say, and suggested that another one of his films could get the 3D treatment. Read More »

Titanic 3D in April 2012

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James Cameron has been talking about rereleasing Titanic in a post converted 3D for years now, and it looks like it might finally happen in 2012 (that is, if the world doesn’t end before then).

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/Film Reader Matt B dropped me an e-mail giving a nice rundown of director James Cameron‘s appearance at Ohio State. He talked about Avatar 2, post 3D conversion, Clash of the Titans, his Titanic suicide letter, the science of Avatar, and Jamie Lee Curtis‘ unexpected contribution to the pole dancing scene in True Lies. Read the full report after the jump.
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USA Today got a chance to chat with filmmaker James Cameron who filmed the unannounced Black Eyed Peas concert with 3D cameras in New York’s Times Square on Wednesday night. Cameron dropped a few interesting news tidbits, including information on the 3D release of Titanic, a possible extended cut rerelease of Avatar this Fall, more critical comments on how Hollywood is doing 3D wrong, and his thoughts on authorship of older catelog titles.

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Avatar Overtakes Titanic’s Domestic Box Office Haul

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A quick note, and hopefully one of the last stories we’ll have to run about Avatar breaking yet another box office record. This week, James Cameron‘s current film overtook his last one in the domestic box office tally. In its full theatrical run, Titanic grossed $600.8 million while Avatar has now taken $601.2 million in only 47 days. Go ahead and cite inflation and the 3D surcharge on ticket prices as factors in Avatar‘s gross; reportedly, more than 80% of Avatar‘s domestic business is from 3D screenings.

For a film that was pegged as a sure-fire failure by some, beating Titanic in less than two months is a hell of a thing, even with inflation and the 3D price bump.

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Tonight, James Cameron‘s Avatar will become the #2 highest grossing movie of all time, and in just 20 days of release. The sci-fi 3d film will have overtaken The Lord Of The Rings: Return Of The King, which has a worldwide total of $1,119,110,941. Of course, Cameron has a ways to go, about $725 million, if he wants to sink the Titanic, the number one highest grossing film of all time and his last narrative feature film.

via: Finke

Avatar

Remember a month ago when we were having conversations questioning if Avatar was going to earn its money back? If they film could cross $600 million worldwide? Would the movie be a success? Would audiences really go see this movie with ten foot tall blue cat people?

James Cameron‘s Avatar has crossed the $1 billion mark at the worldwide box office in just 17 days, surpassing Christopher Nolan‘s The Dark Knight to become #4 of all time. By the end of the week, the film is expected to surpass Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King to become the #2 worldwide release of all time. Of course, for now, Cameron’s Titanic remains seated at #1. James Cameron has become the first director to have two films earn $1 Billion. And by the end of the week, it should be up to $3 billion total between the two movies.

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