For about a year now, Let Me In and Cloverfield director Matt Reeves has been attached to a new theatrical film based on The Twilight Zone. It was just one of several projects on the director’s plate and certainly the most high profile. In that time, multiple writers had been tasked with writing a screenplay but, with nare a greenlight in sight after a year, it seems Reeves has decided to move on. He will no longer direct Warner Bros. new Twilight Zone movie.

Instead, he’s now become the frontrunner to replace Rupert Wyatt as the director of Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. Also on the short list behind Reeves: J Blakeson (The Disappearance of Alice Creed)Juan Carlos Fresnadillo (28 Weeks Later), Jeff Nichols (Take Shelter), Guillermo del Toro (Hellboy), Juan Antonio Bayona (The Impossible) and Rian Johnson (Looper). Read more after the jump.

Read More »

.

Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

Briefly: Warner Bros. is still poking at a new take on The Twilight Zone, and has set a new writer to tackle the script. Joby Harold, who did work on the Tom Cruise project All You Need is Kill (which may end up with a different title) is the latest writer on the new thriller/sci-fi picture. Jason Rothenberg wrote the draft that got things going, and Anthony Peckham (Sherlock Holmes) rewrote last year.

Now Variety says Warner Bros. wanted someone with sci-fi chops to take a pass before Matt Reeves (Cloverfield, Let Me In) directs the feature. We don’t know much about what shape this particular take on the show will have, but the trade says “this pic will have one story that features elements from the “Twilight Zone” universe made popular by Rod Serling’s classic TV series.”

Two projects based on world-famous properties you probably loved growing up are inching just a little bit closer to the big screen. MGM has tapped Todd Berger to adapt Martin Handford‘s children’s book series Where’s Waldo? into a feature, while over at Warner Bros., Invictus and Sherlock Holmes writer Anthony Peckham has entered talks to do a rewrite of Matt ReevesThe Twilight Zone. More details after the jump.

Read More »

Warner Bros. has settled on a director to helm the studio’s new feature based on Rod Serling’s ground-breaking TV series The Twilight Zone. Matt Reeves, director of Cloverfield and Let Me In, will make the movie for the studio based on a script by Jason Rothenberg. What happened to those talks with directors like Christopher Nolan, Michael Bay, Alfonso Cuaron (Children of Men), Rupert Wyatt (Rise of the Planet of the Apes) and David Yates (Harry Potter films)? I bet Matt Reeves is a lot cheaper, and might have promised a cheaper movie overall. And he might be a better choice than most, too. Read More »

slashfilmcast550

This week, Dave Chen, Devindra Hardawar, and Adam Quigley muster some enthusiasm for the new Arrested Development series/movie, try to make some sense of Terra Nova, run down some anime films, and reflect on the prospects of a new Mortal Kombat film. Special guest Katey Rich joins us from Cinemablend.

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Tune in on Sunday night (10/9) at Slashfilm’s live page at 10 PM EST / 7 PM PST as we review Real Steel.

Download or Play Now in your Browser:

Subscribe to the /Filmcast:


Read More »

twilight_zone

Now, the time has finally arrived that you might actually be excited about a Twilight movie…

Warner Bros is in talks with Christopher Nolan, Michael Bay, Alfonso Cuaron (Children of Men), Rupert Wyatt (Rise of the Planet of the Apes) and David Yates (Harry Potter films) for a new movie adaptation of The Twilight Zone. The 1983 Twilight Zone movie was presented as an anthology, each of the four stories helmed by A-list directors: Steven Spielberg, John Landis, Joe Dante and George Miller. Hollywood no longer likes the idea of an anthology film (note Warner Bros’ handling of the highly praised 2007 horror anthology film Trick ‘r Treat), so the new movie is one storyline, and will require a single director.

Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

This had to happen: a company has picked up the life rights to The Twilight Zone creator Rod Serling, and is seeking to make a biopic about the pioneering television writer/producer who defined the popular approach to science fiction and unusual short stories when The Twilight Zone hit the airwaves in 1959. Read More »

Netflix is getting a lot of competition of late, whether from Hulu‘s huge deal with Criterion or Amazon‘s new streaming service through Amazon Prime and a planned streaming offering from Redbox. At the same time, some content owners are getting more prickly when it comes to negotiating deals to stream content online. In short, the digital age of distribution is taking a couple steps forward and everyone wants their share.

So every new content deal is a good thing for any given company on the playing field. That said, here’s a new Netflix deal that might not do huge numbers, but could be a boon for fans: the company has signed a new two-year non-exclusive deal with CBS to stream the company’s library content, including The Twilight Zone, Twin Peaks and the various incarnations of Star Trek. Read More »

Briefly: This is an incremental update to basically check in on the new Twilight Zone film that Warner Bros. and Leonardo DiCaprio’s company Appian Way have been developing. Screenwriter Jason Rothenberg has been hired to write a new draft of the film. Last time we heard anything about this one, WB had tapped The Astronaut’s Wife writer/director Rand Ravich to pen a script.

That’s all we’ve got. There’s no word on whether this might be a page one rewrite (which is vaguely implied by the fact that Deadline doesn’t say this will be a rewrite of the Ravich draft) or what shape this script might take. Because prior revivals of The Twilight Zone have all relied in part upon remakes of original episodes, Deadline’s article supposes that we’re in for more new takes on classic tales originally penned by series creator Rod Serling and writers such as Richard Matheson.

Jason Rothenberg’s only produced credit, so far as I can tell, is the TV movie Body Politic, which I haven’t seen. (And is not an adaptation of the Clive Barker story of the same name.)