If the doling out of awards by the New York Film Critics Circle, and the release of the Annie Awards nominations hadn’t made it clear, as we’ve passed into December the movie business award season is officially open.

The latest stage in the game is the release of a shortlist of documentaries that will be considered by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for nomination for the Best Documentary Oscar early next year. (This is not the nomination list — that will be released in January.) There are a few nice inclusions (such as our Sundance fave Searching for Sugar Man), some expected inclusions (The Invisible War, The Imposter, How to Survive a Plague) along with a batch of other possible nominations that we can all argue over. Read More »

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/Filmcast Ep. 193 – The Imposter

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This week, Dave, Devindra, and Adam respond to your feedback about The Amazing Spider-Man, join Team Margaret, and review one of the most thrilling documentaries of the year.

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. We’ll be reviewing The Dark Knight Rises next week.

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If one of your family members disappeared for almost four years and then came back into your life, would you recognize them? How could you be sure this person, who you once thought you knew so well, was actually who they said they were? You’re probably thinking that you’d just know the person, no questions asked. Bart Layton‘s fascinating documentary The Imposter, however, suggests that might not always be the case.

Nicholas Barclay disappeared at the age of 13. Years later, his family got a call saying that he’d been found in Spain. His sister flew out to see him, and brought him home. All was right with the world. Except for one thing: the person they thought was Nicholas wasn’t Nicholas. It was a Frenchman named Frédéric Bourdin.

The Imposter, which received rave reviews at Sundance and South by Southwest, opens in New York July 13 before expanding to other cities throughout August. We’re lucky enough to have an exclusive clip. In it, you’ll see one of the dozens of incredible feats Bourdin had to overcome to convince the Barclay family he was, in fact, Nicholas. Read More »

Year after year, documentaries prove that as the old saying goes, the truth really is wilder than fiction. This year’s Sundance hit The Imposter tells the tale of a Texas family whose 13-year-old child disappeared in 1994. Three years later, their son was found in Spain, telling tales of kidnapping and torture. The family rejoiced at having their son back, but the happiness lasted only a few months before the truth came out: the boy who’d come home wasn’t actually missing child Nicholas Barclay, but a 23-year-old Frenchman and serial imposter named Frédéric Bourdin. Directed by Bart Layton, the documentary uses recreations, home movie footage, and interviews with Bourdin, the family, and others involved to piece together the crazy story. Watch the trailer after the jump.

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Attendees of South by Southwest 2012 are in for a treat. 130 feature films will screen at the Austin, Texas festival taking place March 9-17. Among them are 65 World Premieres, 17 North American Premieres and 10 U.S. Premieres. The organization already announced Drew Goddard and Joss Whedon’s The Cabin in the Woods would open the festival (the movie is phenomenal) and today the majority of the remaining line up has been revealed. One of the highlights is the unbelievably smart and hilarious 21 Jump Street, directed by Phil Lord & Christopher Miller. Both of those are World Premieres.

Other highlights include The Hunter, Killer Joe, The Babymakers, frankie goes boom, God Bless America, The Imposter, The Raid, Bernie and Casa de mi Padre just to name a few.

After the jump, read descriptions of all the films that have been announced so far. Read More »

Bart Layton‘s The Imposter might technically be a documentary, but it feels like a narrative feature. The film tells the story of a Texas family whose 13-year-old son goes missing, only to show up three and a half years later in Spain with a story about kidnap and torture. He is returned home to his family where he lived for a few months before it was revealed that he was an imposter — a frenchman named Frédéric Bourdin.

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