This Week in DVD & Blu-ray is a column that compiles all the latest info regarding new DVD and Blu-ray releases, sales, and exclusive deals from stores including Target, Best Buy and Fry’s.

Rent It

NINE
Beyond the beautifully orchestrated symbolism, and beyond the fanciful narrative, lies the inherent vitality of a struggling artist’s uncompromised vision. I speak not of Nine, but of Fellini’s 8½, the classic film that inspired the musical upon which Nine is based. 8½ is a masterpiece for many reasons, but it’s only capable of achieving what it does because Fellini allowed it to be so achingly personal. With Nine, that introspective quality is missing, leaving us a central protagonist that has plenty of self-perpetuating problems, but no sense of connection to the viewer. Why are we supposed to care about Guido and his narcissistic, womanizing ways? Because he’s played by Daniel Day-Lewis, apparently. Given the nature of the story at hand—a character-driven piece about one man and his relationships with the women around him—this single misstep costs the film the one element it requires most, and no amount of attractive A-list stars, gorgeous cinematography and sumptuous production design can make up for that. It would be bad enough if that were all that were wrong with Nine, but it even fumbles many of the musical numbers—its primary means of distinguishing itself from Fellini’s work. With the exception of a passionate segment featuring Marion Cotillard, the musical sequences (enjoyable though they may be) feel strangely disengaged from the rest of the film, and do little to drive the narrative forward, emotionally or otherwise. As irreparable as these flaws are though, Nine remains watchable; the cast is too good and the technical merits too strong for it not to be. It’s arguably worth renting for the aesthetic appeal alone.
Available on Blu-ray? Yes.
Notable Extras: DVD – A commentary with director Rob Marshall and producer John DeLuca, 8 Featurettes, and 3 music videos. Blu-ray – Includes everything on the DVD, as well as a Sophia Loren Remembers Cinecitta Studios featurette, and a Screen Actors Guild Q&A.

BEST DVD PRICE
Target Best Buy Fry’s
$17.99 $17.99 $15.97
Amazon – $17.99

BEST BLU-RAY PRICE
Target Best Buy Fry’s
$22.99 $25.99 $19.97
Amazon – $22.99

Read More »

.

Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

Tetro

Francis Ford Coppola‘s Tetro has premiered at the Cannes Film Festival to a mixed to lukewarm response. It seems like most critics aren’t too impressed with Coppola’s first original screenplay since 1974′s The Conversation. Here is a quick round-up of the early festival buzz:

Variety: “Tetro is still a work of modest ambition and appeal.” … “Coppola’s gradual lifting of the dramatic lid over the course of more than two hours frankly feels old-fashioned and labored.” … “Coppola lacks the writerly flair to make the big scenes soar or resonate with multiple meanings and dimensions; rather, they more often than not seem abruptly curtailed and somewhat unsatisfying.”

More after the jump.

Read More »

Francis Ford Coppola’s Tetro Movie Trailer

Tetro
The movie trailer for Francis Ford Coppola‘s Tetro is now online. Coppola’s second film in the last 12 years, his first original screenplay since The Conversation, and is the movie is being billed as his most personal film yet. Based from memories and emotions from his early life, though totally fictional, Tetro is the “bittersweet story of two brothers, of family lost and found and the conflicts and secrets within a highly creative Argentine-Italian family.”

Judging from the trailer, Tetro looks and feels like a film from 60 years ago. The black and white cinematography is absolutely gorgeous. Could Tetro be a return to form for Coppola? I really hope so. Watch the trailer after the jump, and leave your thoughts in the comments below.
Read More »

still4

No, it’s not a tidbit about Terminator 4, it’s one regarding a real director and one of the best ever. Over on the official site for Tetro, his latest film set for release this year, Francis Ford Coppola has posted a brief video update on the $15 million drama (shooting has completed in Argentina), the actors involved, including lead actor Vincent Gallo (Buffalo 66, Tumblr), and so forth. We also get a handheld panorama of his nic-nac-friendly work station out in Napa Valley. Personally, I get overly-occupied with looking at creative spaces online. Todd Selby should get out there stat.

Coppola looks and sounds pleased with how the process is going, calling Gallo “brilliant,” and remarking that Tetro is the first “original screenplay” he’s written since The Conversation (not too shabby, that one). He then points the camera over to a new, unrelated  script he’s writing. As we reported last year, Tetro follows two brothers, the titular eldest played by Gallo, the other by newbie Alden Ehrenreich, who endure “rivalries born out of creative differences passed down through generations of an artistic Italian immigrant family.” Also co-starring are Maribel Verdu (Pan’s Labryinth) as a love interest, and Carmen Maura (Volver) in a role originally intended for Javier Bardem, who not uncharacteristically dropped out. This is subject matter that Coppola knows like a glass of wine—referring to it as semi-autobiographical—and I get a damn good feeling about it. If only Michael V. Gazzo were alive to shout at Gallo about the good ol’ days.

via Motion/Captured

Oh Boy. It’s the Slashfilm Clean-Up!

kingpin_20.jpg

There’s a lot of minor news breaking today and falling in between the cushions of Slashfilm’s buttery soft couch. I’ve decided to reach in and present the tasty morsels for your enjoyment. Don’t like some of ‘em? Well, your dog doesn’t discriminate and if it does, surprise, it’s a kitty.

max-payne-1.jpg

October’s Max Payne video adaptation continues to build a curious borderline-honor roll of a cast, with Chris O’Donnell (Robin) climbing out of the Where Are They Now File to star alongside Mark Wahlberg (title role), the foxy Mila Kunis (uh, assassin love interest), Beau friggin’ Bridges (mentor) and Donal Logue (not playing Jimmy the Cab Driver). O’Donnell will play nipple-free “executive Jason Colvin.” Exciting, innit? Now, if only the film was rated R. (EW)

javier_bardem.jpgJavier Bardem, the biggest star in born again director Francis Ford Coppola‘s follow-up to Youth Without Youth, Tetro, has either dropped out or been replaced on a huge creative whim. Coppola will recast the role of Bardem’s mentor to Vincent Gallo’s title character with Carmen Maura, whom you may have caught in Volver. Hmmm, Coppola could have certainly used the awareness of the Oscar winner. Too bad. (HR) As we all do when a job falls through, Bardem is said to be considering a role as a respected wine critic in a film entitled The First Emperor starring naughty monkeys Helen Mirren and Hugh Grant. (DH)

righetti_amanda1.jpg

The horror! Another fresh face from The O.C. has washed ashore on Crystal Lake. Amanda Rhigetti, an 8, is close to signing on as the female lead in Platinum Dunes’ Friday the 13th. How about a cameo by Adam Brody’s head? (Variety)

Latino Review sum up Sam Raimi‘s script to his upcoming Drag Me to Hell with three words: Predictable as hell. Slashfilm previously summed up the entire movie even more succinctly with: Justin Long. Obviously we’re too smart to add “as hell” to that. However, that was before we caught Long’s performance in The Sasquatch Gang (now on DVD), which was maddeningly chuckle-inducing. “Predictable as hell” it is, then.

Billy Crudup is that guy you call when your film is looking good. He’ll play J. Edgar Hoover (kinky) in Michael Mann‘s Public Enemies, which stars Johnny Depp, Christian Bale and the Dorf and has as much chance as sucking as UNC losing the Final Four. Jinx? Hardly. [Variety]

fletch1.jpg

Where’s my sickly neighbor from 1988′s inhaler? Joshua Jackson says he will not be playing Fletch in the remake. Chevy Chase’s is one of my favorite Chevy Chase films. I say cast Michael Cera and let Jason Lee choke on a furball. [MTV]

The new film from Heathers writer/legend Daniel Waters opens tomorrow in select theaters. It’s called Sex and Death 101. Here’s an interview with Waters that’s so chockfull of amazingly pretentious, pseudo-intellectual name dropping it makes us realize how rarely we come across screenwriter interviews like this anymore. More Waters, please.

fall-of-hyperion.gif

Hard hitter producer Graham King (The Departed, Blood Diamond) and Warner Bros. hope to bring the Hugo Award-winning sci-fi series Hyperion Cantos to life on screen via a script by relative newcomer Trevor Sands. I’m not familiar with author Dan Simmons‘s works, but the plot is said to be set on a planet called Hyperion that has lucid blue skies, “electricity-spewing trees,” and a mysterious region called the Time Tombs, where time travel evidently goes down amongst artifacts. And a very pissed off monster guards them. Ooh la la. Sands will combine the first two novels, Hyperion and The Fall of Hyperion in his script. An original, brainy sci-fi film? All for it. Any fans, please sounds off in the comments below. (HR)

supreme2.jpg

Having apparently dropped out of Dario Argento’s giallo Giallo because he was disgusted that the director cast his daughter in the film and there after announced his retirement, actor and socialite Vincent Gallo is now set to star as the title character in Francis Ford Coppola‘s Tetro. Maybe cockiness gets you somewhere in life after all. Also set to star in the film are Oscar winner Javier Bardem (No Country for Old Men) as a literary critic and Maribel Verdu (Pan’s Labyrinth) as Gallo/Tetro’s love interest. Intriguing cast to say the least.

The film is reportedly a familial epic set in Buenos Aires, Argentina and will follow actor Alden Ehrenreich, who’s done TV work on CSI, as a younger brother searching for his older brother, Tetro. The brothers belong to a long family history filled with back-stabbing and egos runs amok. At one time, Gallo’s role was rumored to be played by actor Matt Dillon, who worked with Coppola on 1983′s rather cool gang movie Rumble Fish. This is quite an interesting replacement, one that will definitely change the feel of the movie, such is Gallo’s crazy-eyed intensity.

Coppola’s film is set for release in 2009, and it’s another relatively low budget affair, set at $15 million, after his last outing, Youth Without Youth, which received rather savage reviews and toxic word of mouth. I didn’t see it, but it’s on the list. And maybe it’s just me, but there seems to be a little post-release upswing buzz for the film now.

Okay, can’t resist. Here’s the quote Gallo gave announcing that he wanted to leave Argento’s film (it’s worth noting that he was engaged to Asia Argento in 1998)…

“After they cast Asia Argento, I’ve been trying to get out of it. I’d rather not be in a movie with her. I’m not a fan. I was a fan of her father’s. I’m retiring.”

Discuss: Vincent Gallo working with Francis Ford Coppola. Do you care? And is the end near?

Source Link: HR/AICN

Cool Posts From Around the Web: