This Week in DVD & Blu-ray is a column that compiles all the latest info regarding new DVD and Blu-ray releases, sales, and exclusive deals from stores including Target, Best Buy and Fry’s.

Rent It

GREENBERG
With Noah Baumbach’s directorial breakthrough, The Squid and the Whale, he managed to capture a sense of harsh honesty that permeated all of the aggressive dysfunctionality. That honesty was something he lost with his next effort, Margot at the Wedding, which felt more like a coldly calculated, emotionally false hate-filled diatribe. With Greenberg, Baumbach falls somewhere in the middle of his two past efforts. The film’s titular character (played by Ben Stiller) is as believable a creation as anyone Baumbach has concocted—though decidedly more unpleasant. Where the film falters is its depiction of the relationship that spawns between Greenberg and his brother’s assistant, Florence (played by Greta Gerwig). Gerwig is delightful in the role—charming, cute, a little odd—but the film presents no plausible justification for why Florence would be so drawn to Greenberg, especially after he’s been such a repugnant asshole. There’s also the problem of Greenberg himself. Unless viewers share or can relate to his social anxieties and misanthropic worldview, he may be too unlikable for many to handle. The character is a compelling peculiarity, portrayed with a suitably fretful energy by Stiller, but the only way to appreciate the film’s examination of this figure is if you actually care about him, and I suspect that many won’t.
Available on Blu-ray? Yes.
Notable Extras: DVD & Blu-ray – 3 featurettes (“A Behind-the-Scenes Look at Greenberg”, “Greenberg Loves Los Angeles”, “Noah Baumbach Takes a Novel Approach”).

BEST DVD PRICE
Target Best Buy Fry’s
$22.59 $19.99 $24.00
Amazon – $18.49

BEST BLU-RAY PRICE
Target Best Buy Fry’s
$30.39 $26.99 $29.00
Amazon – $29.99

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